Jump to content


Photo

Applying For Handicapped Parking Placard Idea?


  • Please log in to reply
3 replies to this topic

#1 CheeryBunny

CheeryBunny

    Member

  • Members
  • 39 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Los Angeles
  • Interests:N with C

Posted 04 January 2014 - 01:01 PM

I'm a very aware and careful PWN driver. I'm fortunate that I have enough warning before an attack to be able to pull off the road and take a short nap before resuming my journey.

But closing my eyes when I'm alone in my car, especially at night, makes me feel vulnerable. And sometimes the only well-lit, safe spot to nap is in one of the disabled parking spots up close to a business, in a green curb zone, or on a residential street with zoned parking permits.

So I'm considering applying for a handicapped parking placard. But I don't want to tip off the DMV and concern anyone over about my N (because there truly isn't a reason to worry.

So what do you think of specifying my disability on the application as "autoimmune Gelineau syndrome"?

#2 Hank

Hank

    Member

  • Members
  • 1,009 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 04 January 2014 - 03:04 PM

http://treds.ucsd.ed...equirements.pdf

 

From what I have read, California requires physicians to report certain illnesses to the DMV, including Narcolepsy.

 

Also, your physician would need to fill out a form for a parking permit. It is unlikely a physician would use a term other than Narcolepsy. Plus, a California physician would then be required to report you to the DMV.

 

Unless I am incorrect, it sounds like you would be opening a can of worms. Since you are concerned about the DMV, you must have managed to remain unreported to the DMV.

 

I don't live in a state where my physicians are required to report me- and I am not required to report myself.

 

If this is significant enough that a parking permit would make your life better, then going through the official route might be a good decision.

 

When I stop to rest while driving, I usually prefer to park a little out of the way. I have gotten the friendly tap on the window from concerned people just checking to make sure I was alive. I completely understand people's concern- I would do the same thing.

 

I hope you find a good solution.



#3 CheeryBunny

CheeryBunny

    Member

  • Members
  • 39 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Los Angeles
  • Interests:N with C

Posted 04 January 2014 - 03:48 PM

Thanks for your reply. My understanding of the CA DMV reporting requirement is that physicians must report "conditions such as sleep apnea and narcolepsy where they interfere with driving." Since I've had narcolepsy for 20 years without a single traffic incident, due to treatment and awareness of my limitations, I don't meet the reporting criterion. But, while I wouldn't use it very often, there are certainly times when I would feel safer having that parking permit in my arsenal of tools.

 

Since this is just a less popular name for narcolepsy, I just figured suggesting this to my physician it might be a good way to draw less attention to myself so that I don't end up wasting a lot of time I don't have tied up in unnecessary red tape.  :)

 

(I usually park out of the way, too. But I live in a very big city and travel alone to other very big cities a fair bit. More than a handful of times I've found myself driving around and around trying to find a parking space, looking longingly at a dozen empty handicapped spots. Even though I wouldn't be more than 10 minutes, and would usually not even leave the car to tinkle, I just can't bring myself to pull into a handicapped spot without an actual permit.) 



#4 80920

80920

    Member

  • Members
  • 1 posts

Posted 13 January 2014 - 01:40 PM

I've had a handicapped parking permit for 20 years. The main thing to keep in mind- not all disabilities will qualify for the parking. Remember, your doctor is putting his career and license on the line by certifying you have a disability which makes it difficult for you to walk more than 100 feet comfortably. Most states require the handicapped person to be seen getting in or out of the vehicle, while parked in the designated spot. Thus, that rule prevents people from "sitting" in the handicapped park, and not using for the access it was designed for- access to a public/private place.