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Easily Startled- Symptom Of N?

jumpy startled blushing catatonic daze glaze

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#1 ruthie s.

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Posted 09 December 2013 - 07:08 AM

Just diagnosed w/ N after 20 years of excessive sleepiness; just wondering about the cataplexy, if it can take various forms.

I've always been the jumpiest person I know- sometimes when ppl came around the corner unexpectedly or said something from out of the silence. This has been before, and since adderall.

Also before adderall - ( which I've taken for 10 yrs, after "ADD" diagnosis.. a life saver, btw, in terms of being to carry out a very functional fatigue free life while on it) - remember going through phases of months of random BLUSHING.

Bruises - ppl have always asked me about bruises (I guess there are many?) - and they seem familiar when asked but can never put my finger on the exact event that caused this, that, ot those bruises.

And lastly, catatonic glaze - get this on my adderrall sometimes - where I'm in a tired-like trance not dozing, awake, but can barely move. COULD get up and walk if made myself I suppose but just don't. Usually happens when painting- get in a fatigued daze andall my actions are extremely slow motion and eyes are glazed over what im doing.

.......are any of these things considered "cataplexic" in nature? Otherwise, just have EDS no cataplexy. Just curious/ wondering.

#2 ruthie s.

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Posted 09 December 2013 - 07:46 AM

- oh and one more thing -- messiness/inability to clean or do responsibilities - started getting like this 5 yrs ago and has gotten worse over the last 2-3 yrs, somewhere between the increased stress & binge sleeping. Even when on adderral (note: Have never been treated for SLEEP until just now star ting Xyrem) - I have an unexplained aversion or inability to clean up the wrecks I accumulated around the house. I will repeatedly set out to do it, time and time again, but defying all logic I immediately feel tired + this other unexplained sensation of simply just NOT BEING ABLE TO DO IT. And it's very distressing. I must sit on the couch, or get glazed over in an activity like painting. Very mystifying to my own self. Just wondering if anything here, too, can be explained in terms of N complications.

#3 pinklady72191

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Posted 09 December 2013 - 06:31 PM

I hope someone responds with information about the easily startled part of your original post. I find that I am really jumpy as well. I am not diagnosed with anything...I'm just now starting to pursue why I have always been sleepy.



#4 Hank

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Posted 09 December 2013 - 08:26 PM

Regarding "jumpiness". Are you jumping up or dropping down. I ask this because I thought I was over reacting to being startled- to the point that I HATED being startled because it took me time to recover. I do not jump up when startled, my knees give out, go to my knees, with my head down.

 

So, I am interested to know is exactly what you mean by jumpy and what happens to you.

 

If you are feeling sleepy or dozy or foggy, a startle may be extra off-putting aside from any possible muscle weakness.



#5 ruthie s.

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Posted 10 December 2013 - 12:29 PM

no, just scream

#6 Hank

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Posted 10 December 2013 - 01:01 PM

If you just scream, that does not seem N related.

#7 ruthie s.

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Posted 10 December 2013 - 02:50 PM

k.. did not think so. Just wondering why most ppl come out w/ cataplexy symptoms but some don't.

#8 ABitColtish

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Posted 14 December 2013 - 11:15 PM

My best for the glaze is ADD/ADHD, but I don't know enough about the disorders or about adderall to back up that statement. I am not officially diagnosed, but I have done plenty of research that suggests that I have ADHD, and from what I've read, people with the disorder sometimes feel like they actions are really slow. Apparently that translates into "regular time," as well, because my mom always complains that I'm slow as molasses. I also tend to space out in a daze, especially when I'm really tired. It's like all my mind leaves my body for a couple minutes and so I'm not looking at anything or doing anything, I'm just not really...there, anymore. Kind of scary when I come back to reality. I've had embarrassing moments where I'm listening to professors in a seminar, and they see me staring at them and listening intently, but then I ask them to repeat an instruction because I've completely left the building for a  few seconds. It probably confuses them.

 

As for the bruises, being sleep deprived (I've talked to college student friends about this, too, it's not just a N thing) often results in minor injuries that you don't notice at first. Sleep deprivation makes you kind of uncoordinated and less focused on some things, so you might bump into objects/furniture and not realize it. (Unless you're like me, walking into walls and missing the doorway altogether.) With bruises specifically, maybe it also comes from lack of restorative sleep, in that your body isn't able to heal as quickly as it should? (shrug) Not sure --I'm a humanities major, not pre-med.

 

As for the jumpiness/inability to clean or cope with responsibilities/increased stress, I would suggest looking into anxiety. It's not uncommon for narcoleptics to experience symptoms of anxiety, especially when they're put under enough pressure --i.e. I didn't think I had anxiety until about a couple weeks ago, right before finals week. I'd already been under a lot of academic stress for a month, which included sleeping about 4hrs/night and working nonstop with no mental breaks like partying or even watching TV, and I finally mapped out on a calendar all of the assignments I had to get done for finals. We have several "reading days" after the end of classes, which allow us to have free time to study and catch up on sleep before taking exams. I realized that all of my professors expected my finals to be due before readings days even begun (ergo before finals week which is ridiculous), meaning I had to skip class just to work on my finals: write 20 pages for English, a test in Russian, write up a presentation in Russian, give that presentation, finish editing a video project, and do readings and watch video lectures for an exam. All while going to classes and turning in "regular homework" assignments for half of them. I lost it.

I'd already experienced non-temperature-induced shivering and being on the verge of a meltdown for a week, but my breathing became erratic and I literally had to go through breathing techniques and then sleep my attack away. To me, these were the key indicators that I had legitimate anxiety, but I was going through other things before my attack. 

 

Because I am new to researching anxiety, I still don't know much about it, but I encourage you to at least check it out. You might be experiencing some of the non-attack symptoms as well.



#9 Hank

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Posted 15 December 2013 - 10:27 AM

ABitColtish-  while you are going through this diagnostic time, I want to offer a few suggestion from my own experience

 

Regarding ADHD- hold that diagnosis loosely. There is symptom overlap between N and ADHD and both respond to stimulants. They are, however, completely unrelated. It is not uncommon for N to be missed because ADHD seems, at first glass, to be the easiest explanation.

 

Have you gone through cognitive testing to support your ADHD diagnosis. I ask this because, at one point, I suspected I may have ADHD. My family doc started me on Adderall which made a big difference. I was then sent for cognitive testing which did not support a dx of ADHD. But just based upon clinical symptoms, ADHD seemed like an easy explanation.

 

It is not uncommon for people with N to receive multiple diagnoses before receiving the correct diagnosis of N. For example, some of us have been suspected of having: Depression; Anxiety; ADHD. For those suspected diagnoses, we have then often been prescribed Antidepressants and Stimulants. When we get relief from those medications, that relief becomes proof that the diagnosis was correct because the treatment worked.  

 

I hope for you, during this time, that you can focus on the symptoms that you experience, rather than attributing those symptoms to an illness you may or may not have.