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Loss For Words Or Unable To Name Objects

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#21 Ferret

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Posted 26 November 2013 - 08:49 AM

IMHO, it happens to everyone. If it starts happening a LOT, then I  would be concerned.

I HATE losing my glasses...'cuz I need my glasses to find my glasses. But, I can assure you that, one day, if I find them in the refrigerator...THEN it will be time to be worried.



#22 drago

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Posted 09 December 2013 - 04:14 AM

Dysnomia (also referred to as anomic aphasia) is a very annoying problem, especially when you're collaborating on projects. Luckily, many people that know me think I'm "idiosyncratic" and usually aren't put off when I say something like, "I got stuck in traffic because the Oh-no-the-lights-are-out-people were fixing the wires because of a fallen branch." (No joke, that's something I've actually said out loud to other people.)

That being said, I've formulated a few methods that've helped me deal with this issue (besides everyone around me thinking I just say things weird!). I think these things work for me because the cause of this word-fumbling annoyance is transitory / intermittent in nature. (Dysnomia can also be cause by brain damage.)

1. Dysnomia (transient) comes in many forms. Exploiting this knowledge can help you 'jog' your brain.

2. Most of us are highly visual -- for example, the original poster mentioned that when they'd see a clock, they'd know what it is, but they couldn't name it. Next time you experience this problem, close your eyes and listen to the clock, or touch the clock and look away. The different sensory input (i.e. tactile from touch, or audio from sound) can jog your brain when it comes to words.

3. Multilingual tactics. This is really helpful for 'everyday' words (like clock, desk, sponge, etc.) that are really embarrassing to forget (at least for me) because I use them so much. Sometimes you can't think of the word in your 'native' language, but if you try for it in another language (for me, it's French), you mind find the word. This can help you get back to the word you really want to say. I picked French because if I wind up saying that word instead of its English counterpart, people think I'm just being fancy. (i.e. "I like your chien!" People will be like, "Why didn't you just say 'dog'?")

 

4. Sneaky tactics can help your brain. Sometimes I'll take a piece of my hair and rub it between my fingers. I have no idea why, but this act can actually help me with stuff like this. Similarly, using aromatherapy helps me, too -- unforutnately, I've yet to discover a method of using this in public, as most people consider see anyone sniffing a vial suspicious, no matter how casually you try to do it. Even if you dab the scent on a hankerchief, people will still think you're 'huffing' -- but when I'm home I can use aromatherapy ot help.

 

5. Simiarly, getting 'something to chew' can help. No, seriously! gum, mint, whatever -- taste, just like touch and sound, can push your brain back into the 'on position' when it's flickering.

 

But, yes, I can comiserate. I hate this.

drago



#23 lakewolfwhitecrow

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Posted 20 December 2013 - 06:38 PM

Oh, thank God I got back to this site [numerous med probs besides N]!

 

All of you--thank you so very much! I've been wondering what this is. Even had an IQ test in 2006 to see if I needed an MRI (I know--it doesn't make sense to me either),but IQ was too high :P

 

I told my Dr I was suffering from bouts of aphasia, but she said I wasn't. This is why I don't like drs...I live in this body & know what's going on. Was even asked once by another dr (sarcastically) who told me that  I had N.

 

When I told them it was the Army, they never said another word. Idiots.



#24 browndog319

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Posted 02 January 2014 - 10:00 PM

I have this problem, too! I had no idea it was related to narcolepsy - I haven't mentioned it to anyone because I was really afraid I had freakishly early onset Alzheimer's disease or some sort of blockage in my brain. I will mention it when I go back to my doctor on the 17th. This site has been so helpful in learning about my condition.



#25 DeathRabbit

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Posted 03 January 2014 - 12:01 PM

I get really derpy a lot of the time when I'm tired or have N related headaches. Sometimes, I just expect my brain to turn to goo and dribble out my nose.



#26 Valerie508

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Posted 09 January 2014 - 06:22 PM

omg, that happens to me all of the time! I forget things a lot.. especially when im super tired... but its not only objects that i forget, and its not really forgetting like you said, you know what it is but the word is lost...  you know how it functions and what its for you just for the love of god remember the name for it.

 

It's very frustrating, and i've been laughed at several occasions for it.



#27 Fisherman

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Posted 19 January 2014 - 07:55 AM

Word search...great term. Happens to me all the time! I will go through the alphabet in my head until I get a trigger. Sometimes works. Sometimes not. Can be embarrassing during a conversation while I go through my mental Rolodex.

#28 gfromtn

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Posted 02 February 2014 - 09:43 AM

I agree, great term because that's exactly what many of us do.

For the past 8 months, I've had this.

The conversations between my father (in his mid 70's) and I sound like a badly edited movie.

We'll pause to find a word, right in the middle of a story, then utter things like "well I had it" or even worse using words that are close but don't quite mean what we say. Once the word is found, the conversation continues. We both have ADD (wonder how I got it LOL), so a word searching issue doesn't help.

Thanks for that information Drago, I'm going to write those down. :D



#29 rebgrace

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Posted 07 February 2014 - 07:29 PM

I never realized that this was linked with being so tired! Seems obvious now lol.
I do this ALL the time. I call everything 'thingy' and everybody 'what's his face'. I have a pretty good vocabulary, but you'd never know it by actually listening to me talk.



#30 Asksuzan

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Posted 15 February 2014 - 05:05 PM

Has anyone found any techniques that pull you out of the mumble jumble phase? :wacko:

 

 



#31 Hank

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Posted 16 February 2014 - 08:01 AM

When I loose my words, I just take a pause. I just wait moment. It is almost like waiting for a gas pain to pass- pardon the analogy.

 

Depending on the situation, I may put a tissue to my nose or gesture like I am going to sneeze. That is socially acceptable and takes about the same time for it to pass.

 

I hope that helps.

 

I do think finding ordinary "covers" that allow our symptoms to occur in a socially acceptable way is helpful. Once Cataplexy occurred in public and an annoyingly helpful stranger would not back off. I sat down and said "bad gas" to explain myself and the stranger asked no more questions and quickly left me alone.

 

I do not want to give out my medical history randomly. I do not want to raise suspicion. I do not want to be rude. I do not want to train the world how to manage my symptoms with me. I just want not to be judged for what people "think" I have- or what it is "just like" to them.



#32 gfromtn

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Posted 16 February 2014 - 12:31 PM

I'd like to say my issue happens towards the end of the day, as I grow more tired.

Unfortunately, as many on here have said, this issue can happen any time.

I think of a webpage loading, to explain how my loss of words can vary.

Sometimes they are right there in my mind and come out when I need them (fast loading page).

Sometimes they lag a bit, then the word comes up (like a slow connection speed).

And sometimes they don't come out at all, so I substitute words. (like the webpage is down, so I find another one to go to.). :D

The level of mental fatigue does play a part in this, but then again I can be fully rested and can't think of the term for a specific object.

Usually happens in conversations, and not by myself.

BTW Ferret, my wife says she found the salt shaker in the cabinet with the drinking glasses and plates.

That explains why I couldn't find it.



#33 Asksuzan

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Posted 16 February 2014 - 02:44 PM

For me I hear the word in my head it seems to be the transfer of the object to speech that seems to be messed up. If your a geek it is like ICMP packet loss.

My mind says fork internally but it can't relay the information to my language centers. A bad switch or a packet storm is how I explain it sometimes.

I normally tell people I have N so I don't have to have them stare at me with that confused yet concerned look.

#34 ljmish21

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Posted 22 February 2014 - 10:53 PM

My two cents:  Ya...I thought "it" was early onset Alzheimers!  Because of the loss of REM for so many years, like a few of you explained, I tend to forget things, both long and short term. I also lose the names of obejcts on occasion.  I guess we won't know for sure if I ever develop dementia or Alzheimers!  My neuro said sooner or later he hears that question from all of his N patients.



#35 BrainCloud

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Posted 17 March 2014 - 10:48 PM

I'm glad I'm not the only one who does this.  I always felt like an idiot for not remembering simple words...or, I knew them, they just slipped my mind at the time.  I agree about the movie buff thing, I have that occassionally where an actor's name slips my mind.  Like I couldn't remember Jeff Goldblum's name once.  WHY?!  I'm constantly forgetting things too, and then I turn to my husband, hold out my hand and say "Hi!  I'm Dory!"  (the fish from "Finding Nemo" who couldn't remember things for more than 3 seconds).  >_<



#36 PikaMika

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Posted 18 March 2014 - 06:43 AM

That happens to me all time. I forget words, names, lose things, and say incomplete thoughts. I always thought I just wasn't the smartest person in the world and that why it happened.





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