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Natural Treatment That Works (For Me)


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#21 AMxreborn

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Posted 27 August 2014 - 02:12 PM

Hank, it's very obvious you know absolutely nothing and are trying to compensate by antagonizing Jay. I'm guessing you have little man syndrome and an inferiority complex. Too bad for you but you'll be alright when the sirens knock on your door right?



#22 Ferret

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Posted 27 August 2014 - 09:51 PM

Hank, it's very obvious you know absolutely nothing and are trying to compensate by antagonizing Jay. I'm guessing you have little man syndrome and an inferiority complex. Too bad for you but you'll be alright when the sirens knock on your door right?

 

Are you hallucinating? Hank has not made a single post in this thread so to whom are you directing your antagonist comments?



#23 Midoriliem

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Posted Yesterday, 07:30 AM

I have a question that perhaps Chemist can answer (sorry, Chemist, if this seems like a busman's holiday)...I think you outlined why Gingko has a weak effect.  I had read/heard mixed reviews about it, as well as about Asian ginseng, melatonin, valerian, lemon balm, and chamomile. I tried rhodiola rosea but all it did was make me dissociate (I have PTSD and am prone to dissociation). The more I read, the more the "evidence" seems to contradict itself.  I was wondering if you had any clarity on the efficiacy of these supplements, or why rhodiola rosea could cause dissociation.  Thanks!



#24 Chemist

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Posted Yesterday, 12:43 PM

I have a question that perhaps Chemist can answer (sorry, Chemist, if this seems like a busman's holiday)...I think you outlined why Gingko has a weak effect.  I had read/heard mixed reviews about it, as well as about Asian ginseng, melatonin, valerian, lemon balm, and chamomile. I tried rhodiola rosea but all it did was make me dissociate (I have PTSD and am prone to dissociation). The more I read, the more the "evidence" seems to contradict itself.  I was wondering if you had any clarity on the efficiacy of these supplements, or why rhodiola rosea could cause dissociation.  Thanks!

 

Melatonin can probably be excluded from that group as we know a great deal about its properties, effects, and efficacy due to the large numbers of studies involving it. There's still more to be learned but there's no question that endogenous melatonin is involved in regulation of the circadian rhythm and immune system, and that exogenous melatonin is able to activate the same pathways as endogenous melatonin.

 

Herbal supplements are problematic in terms of research. They may contain hundreds of potentially active compounds and samples may vary widely in the proportion of compounds. It's not a simple task to determine which of the compounds are active and which do nothing at all. Once an active compound is identified, you then have to figure out how it works in the body. Before starting down that road, it's therefore important to determine if the herbal supplement actually has any significant effects at all. You'll see a large number of these studies done and it's not uncommon for conflicting results to be present.

 

As far as postulating on why a particular supplement is or isn't efficacious, that would require having at least a general idea of the mechanism of action, should one exist. Often that kind of information simply is not known. That's the case for rhodiola rosea, where a handful of potentially active compounds have been identified but it's uncertain how these might exert effects in the body.

 

If you would like me to take a complete stab in the dark, then assuming PTSD involves dysregulation of the HPA axis and assuming spikes in norepinephrine/epinephrine can serve as triggers for your dissociative symptoms, then perhaps rhodiola rosea directly or indirectly alters levels of catecholamines. It's not an unreasonable guess, but completely unsubstantiated and therefore worthless except as a possible research topic.



#25 NetiNeti

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Posted Yesterday, 04:48 PM

I have a question that perhaps Chemist can answer (sorry, Chemist, if this seems like a busman's holiday)...I think you outlined why Gingko has a weak effect.  I had read/heard mixed reviews about it, as well as about Asian ginseng, melatonin, valerian, lemon balm, and chamomile. I tried rhodiola rosea but all it did was make me dissociate (I have PTSD and am prone to dissociation). The more I read, the more the "evidence" seems to contradict itself.  I was wondering if you had any clarity on the efficiacy of these supplements, or why rhodiola rosea could cause dissociation.  Thanks!

Rhodiola rosea works for me. It helps with my chronic fatigue and helps me sleep better. I think it also acts as a mild SSRI, which would explain that. 



#26 Midoriliem

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Posted Yesterday, 05:09 PM

I'm not sure if it worked for me or not. I do know that it seemed to reverse the effects of the catapres and zoloft I take for the PTSD, which is usually well managed. Trying to stay grounded and focused effectively wore me out. It was disappointing because I've heard good things about RR.