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How Does A Common Cold/flu Mess With You?


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#1 ironhands

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Posted 04 October 2013 - 10:34 AM

Rough sleep last night, can't swallow today. 

 

So how often do you get sick?  More often, or more intense than others? 

 

Do OTC meds make you worse or instantly put you out?

 

For me, I often don't get sick, but when I do, it's either much faster than everyone else to clear up, or, it's far far worse. 

 

Always found that some 'tussin or neo-citran knocks me out almost instantly.



#2 Potato

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Posted 05 October 2013 - 12:23 AM

If DXM knocks you out almost instantly, you may have some serotonin dysregulation going on there. DXM is a serotonin reuptake inhibitor.



#3 ironhands

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Posted 05 October 2013 - 09:56 AM

makes sense to me.  when I was on Paxil it'd put me out pretty fast.  It's when I first started to "know" something was wrong with my sleep, really bad sleep intertia, sleepwalking, waking dreams, false awakenings, HH, etc

Wasn't as bad on escitalopram, but I had to take ritalin during the day to stop me from being a zombie, and even then, I was still passing out at my desk around 2-3 every day.

 

Could this suggest a surplus of serotonin already?  That wouldn't make sense with the existing depression, but then again, Paxil made me really euphoric (lawd knows I miss that feeling!).

 

 I'd love to find a doc I could sit with for an hour and really get into symptoms and theories, but my GP interrupts me and talks over me.  The other day it was "doc, i need official testing for celiac", "they'll likely come back negative and it won't change anything", "ok, but, it may assist with my N diagnosis, and right now, my fingers are peeling, having gut swelling, gas/diarrhea..and th...." "you aren't showing enough symptoms"

Doc...if you hadn't cut me off, you might have heard the rest!



#4 Potato

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Posted 05 October 2013 - 01:33 PM

It's difficult to draw general conclusions like saying it could suggest an excessive amount of serotonin or a deficiency of serotonin due to the fact that serotonin is expressed in different areas of the brain in different amounts and it's possible to have hyperactivity in one area and hypoactivity in another at the same time. It's also possible to have an overexpression or underexpression of one subtype of 5-HT receptor relative to the rest of the 5-HT receptor family, which can lead to some receptor subtypes being understimulated, or others being overstimulated. To make a long story short, it quickly becomes a more complicated picture than you might imagine. The general idea is perhaps best demonstrated by the treatment course of SSRIs, where in the first two weeks there can actually be an increase in anxiety and minimal improvement in depressed mood, then as certain 5-HT receptors are downregulated, the therapeutic benefits begin taking effect. If depression were simply an overall deficit in serotonin, we would expect SSRIs to have an immediate and profound effect, rather than this two week lag time. Similarly, we would expect 5-HT receptor antagonists to worsen the problem, but instead they are just as effective if not more effective than the SSRIs.

 

So, at least with our current levels of diagnostic abilities, it often comes down to trying different drugs and seeing which works best, and then working backwards to try to reason out what might be going on in the brain, since we generally know more about how the drug works than the brain that it's treating.

 

In general, though, remember that serotonin suppresses REM sleep so you would expect if you naturally had a surplus of it, that you would have much better sleep architecture at night than you do. Plus, the fact that you seem to be hypersensitive to drugs which exhibit serotonin reuptake properties would generally indicate a low baseline of serotonin levels prior to administration rather than high baseline levels. If you were already being stimulated by large amounts of serotonin, you wouldn't be so sensitive to a modest increase. But again, that would be something of an oversimplification.



#5 Kriqit

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Posted 03 August 2014 - 06:28 AM

Rough sleep last night, can't swallow today.

So how often do you get sick? More often, or more intense than others?

Do OTC meds make you worse or instantly put you out?

For me, I often don't get sick, but when I do, it's either much faster than everyone else to clear up, or, it's far far worse.

Always found that some 'tussin or neo-citran knocks me out almost instantly.


I really hate raising the dead post, but I relate to this. I'm freakishly immune to a lot of seasonal flu. I even tried to get the flu at job corps so they'd send me home lmao (I was young and dumb).

Other then some annoying allergies when the temperature changes, I rarely ever get sick. But when I do, it hits really fast, and really hard. For 24 hours, I can't get off the bed almost at all, and I hibernate. And then within 2 or 3 days, its like nothing happened.

#6 wildagreenbough

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Posted 03 August 2014 - 07:31 AM

I have ME/CFS as well as N so the 'flu really messes me up, which is why I get a 'flu jab every year.  When I was still working in a medical environment being exposed to anybody with the 'flu would  have an effect on me for around 12 hrs even when I'd had my 'flu jab.  Since ME/CFS symptoms feel a lot like coming down with the 'flu anyway Winter was not a fun time for me at the clinic, - more so when fellow workmates would try to be martyrs and solider on despite being ill which would lead to me being constantly exposed to the virus and taking hits on my weakened immune system. It was really annoying actually because every year the same staff would refuse to have a 'flu jab saying they didn't believe it did any good, - and they would be the ones to get knocked out by the virus every darn time.  (Grrrrrr,......).

 

As for meds I just take Prozac which I've done for some years now and it works for me.  I won't take stimulants as even a cup of black coffee can mess me up for the day and problems with un-refreshing sleep is just something I've just learned to live with.  Generally I've taken a holistic approach with careful attention to eating a quality mostly vegetarian diet and maintaining a level of exercise by walking, bicycle riding and Tai Chi.  Too many years working as a mental health professional has left me with a mostly jaundiced view of many medications I'm afraid.