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More Than One Autoimmune Disease?


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#1 Countrygirl9311

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Posted 28 August 2013 - 02:49 AM

I'm starting to see a common thread here with people having more than one autoimmune disease. My husband has fibromyalgia and narcolepsy with cataplexy I thought he was just the one in a billion but now I'm thinking otherwise. Once you have one does it make it easier to get the other. His mom also has two which are lupus and fibro. And his grandmother had a form of Lou Geri's. So are these genetic? Do they work hand in hand? It seems like if you have one you have a better chance for having another. While his are not life threatening they are messing with his quality of life. And trying to coordinate medication for the both of them forget it. We just got the fibro medication down so now I have to talk him into returning to the sleep doctor. So I was just wondering how many others out there have more than one and if you have fibro and n please tell me any trick you know I've been looking for someone like him for forever so he can have someone to relate to. I try but I'll never truly know what he goes through.

#2 sk8aplexy

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Posted 28 August 2013 - 03:41 PM

Am sure there are others on this forum who have both.  I've read that Fibro is a common co-morbid condition, along to/with Narcolepsy.

 

As for it being genetic.  It's said to 'not' be, yet there is a stronger possibility of developing it, through environmental factors, if you do have the predisposed genes (the HLA marker common in the disease).  The environmental factors/influences/triggers seem to be the bigger side of it though; for example 'strep throat' is considered a possible trigger often, in developing the disease after having the virus.  (something along them lines)



#3 Hank

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Posted 28 August 2013 - 04:43 PM

Narcolepsy was is genetic but rare. My children are at a 50 times greater risk because of me, but still they only have a 1% chance.

My second cousin also has N with C- we have a common great grandmother. My diagnosis solved the genetic riddle for her.

However, in Identical Twins, it is less than half the time that both develop N.

So, from what I have read, it seems to be a combination of genetic predisposition and an environmental trigger.

People with birthdays in March have the highest incidence. Males and females about equal. Passive tobacco smoke in household as a child is associated with a higher likelihood.

#4 Countrygirl9311

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Posted 31 August 2013 - 01:25 AM

It's good to hear that just because he has N and Fibro that our kids won't necessarily get it. I think he got Fibro after a head trauma when he was 12 that honestly should have killed him. On a side note, I've also heard that it makes conceiving more difficult. Is there any truth to this or is it myth?

#5 Hank

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Posted 31 August 2013 - 09:03 AM

You are the one who conceives. His N and F should not impact your ability to conceive. N does not affect male fertility and I have heard no information that F does either. None of the N medications impact male fertility either.



#6 sk8aplexy

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Posted 31 August 2013 - 10:02 AM

Narcolepsy, can also be triggered by head trauma...



#7 Benjaplexy

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Posted 31 August 2013 - 11:21 AM

I was diagnosed with post-viral fatigue 5 years ago, which is part of the reason why I've been reluctant to accept my doctor's insistence on narcolepsy. I've been very confused as to what it means for me if I get diagnosed with narcolepsy, as I never did really recover from the PVFS… would it mean I have both? Would I have to discount the PVFS diagnosis in favour of this? How do I know which symptoms go with which condition?



#8 Potato

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Posted 07 September 2013 - 12:44 AM

I was diagnosed with post-viral fatigue 5 years ago, which is part of the reason why I've been reluctant to accept my doctor's insistence on narcolepsy. I've been very confused as to what it means for me if I get diagnosed with narcolepsy, as I never did really recover from the PVFS… would it mean I have both? Would I have to discount the PVFS diagnosis in favour of this? How do I know which symptoms go with which condition?

 

PVFS is a syndrome, not a disease. It's important to know the difference. In PVFS, we know that there was onset of fatigue after a viral infection, but the exact cause of the fatigue is unknown. If the virus that led to PVFS was something like influenza, then it very well could have led to narcolepsy if you were predisposed to it. They're not necessarily separate unrelated issues.

 

So how do you tell the difference? There is not an association between PVFS and sleep-onset REM episodes (SOREMPs), while there is an association between SOREMPs and narcolepsy. You can have a multiple sleep latency test (MSLT) done to confirm diagnosis of narcolepsy.

 

Is it possible to have comorbidity of narcolepsy and PVFS? Yes. But the treatment for the narcolepsy would also treat the symptoms of PVFS.