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Can You Please Tell Me Your Childs First Symptoms?


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#1 squirrel!

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Posted 23 August 2013 - 09:17 PM

Hi,

  I'm sure this has been posted before.

I'm concerned about my 6 year old son. There is something "off" and I haven't put my finger on it yet. He's very bright, and funny and imaginative. But he struggles in school. He is daydreaming, lack of energy etc. I am a special ed teacher and although it looks like ADD on paper, I have this feeling it's not. At home he often says he is tired and yawns frequently but never naps. His sleep is HARD but fitful. He often has all of his blankets kicked off. the most concerning issue though, is I am worried he is getting the Hypnognic Hallucinations and possibly paralysis.. he is terrified every single night while falling asleep. There is one particular "skull shadow" that he "hears, smells and feels" while falling asleep. He comes running to me shaking and crying. It's terrifying. I heard somewhere that recurring dreams in children are cause for concern? is that true? he fears the same figure every night.

 

Also, it's worth noting he had his tonsils and adenoids out at age 2.5, no change in sleeping patterns.

 

I maybe wouldn't be looking at all of this so closely had it not been for my own personal struggle. I am in the process of getting diagnosed with Narcolepsy as well. Should hear final results Monday, but it's  pretty obvious. It's been years of many misdiagnosis and I am so ready to get started with treatment.

 

I have an apt with a pediatric sleep Dr, but it's a few weeks away. Does anyone have anything to add?

 

Thank you so much!!



#2 Hank

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Posted 23 August 2013 - 10:22 PM

Childhood sleep is different in many ways from adult sleep. Some parasomnias, like talking in sleep, are much more common in kids. You are on the right track. I would suggest putting aside the idea of trying to diagnose. just observe him for the purpose of providing a very accurate history to his doctor. As a parent I am also always watchful, but remind myself that our children only have a 1% chance.

#3 squirrel!

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Posted 24 August 2013 - 08:34 AM

Good advice.

  it's a tough balance between over reacting and not doing enough, ya know? I don't want him to suffer.

 

Thanks Hank!



#4 Hopeful10

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Posted 24 August 2013 - 04:36 PM

My son displayed a lot of those symptoms. He was a kicker in the bed, rotating like a clock when he slept, talked, giggled, had nightmares, and would get up at night and come into my room. I would get calls from school because he was complaining to teachers school that he wasn't getting enough sleep at home, despite a reasonable bedtime, and would yawn and put his head down. :(  I tried all the sleep hygiene things for him to help him, including ambient noise in the room, blackout curtains, consistent bedtime, no screen time for 1/2 hour before bed, etc. and at the time, it didn't work.

 

I was concerned about him having Narcolepsy or another sleep disorder since that's what I have along with Cataplexy, OSA and PLM. (My Dad has OSA, sister has PLM, Grandma had mild N, so we have some fun genes in the family. Also, my son's father has OSA.) I took him for a sleep study with my doctor and it turned out okay = no sleep disorders, which surprised me.

 

After that, I was referred to get him checked out for ADD since the problems persisted and he began to have more challenges at school. After extensive neuropsychological testing, it turned out 99% that he had ADHD along with a few other issues. I opted for the neuropsychological testing to get an accurate diagnosis of what was going on. They can detect if there are wiring issues not limited to ADD/ADHD. It has been a journey, which we still are on, but he is doing much better now with treatment, accommodations at school, and things to help him like activities to drain off energy.

 

His onset was around age 7. It was a hard pill for me to swallow that he may have ADD/ADHD because I believe that kids are over diagnosed and didn't want to put him on meds, etc. That's why I opted for all of the testing (sleep, then neuro) instead of just having his pediatrician prescribe a low dose of medication to trial (which was offered before any sleep study.) 

 

Bravo to you for being on top of what is going on with your son and seeking out help for him! I understand the concern. I had the same thing going on and was feeling guilty prior to his sleep study, thinking, goodness, did I pass something along to him? It seems like what alleviated worry for me was information. That included test results and answers to my questions. Any diagnosis isn't easy, especially for your child, but you are doing the right thing at the right time! If by any chance he does have ADD, early intervention is a great thing! :)



#5 squirrel!

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Posted 24 August 2013 - 06:56 PM

Thank you so so much hopeful! Your son sure is lucky to have you!

#6 Hopeful10

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Posted 24 August 2013 - 07:14 PM

Yours too! Good luck to you and him! 



#7 ironhands

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Posted 26 August 2013 - 02:04 PM

night terrors?



#8 Hank

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Posted 26 August 2013 - 02:32 PM

I just spoke with our pediatrician today during our sons annual well visit. She is also a work friend of mine and knows my Dx.

He often talks in his sleep and sometimes yells something- most recently about his new shoes (loves them).

Night terrors are a normal range parasomnia common in children. They are not a symptom of N, are not a predictor of N, and they do not occur during REM.

I have also spoken with my sleep doc about red flags to watch so I don't drive myself (or them) bonkers over normal stuff. He emphasized the importance of not discussing my symptoms in detail with them so that they don't focus on it. Basically, keep watchful with a cool head and avoid the panic button.