Jump to content


Photo

Exercise...good Or Bad?


  • Please log in to reply
7 replies to this topic

#1 Ferret

Ferret

    Member

  • Members
  • 794 posts
  • Gender:Female

Posted 14 July 2013 - 03:46 AM

I'm asking because I'm wondering whether people are doing aerobic exercise or non-aerobic exercise...benefits of either...or none.

I used to be an avid skiier in my early thirties and enjoyed skiing Whistler Mountain every weekend when we lived in Vancouver. I could never understand why I skiied so well in the morning, then literally "fell" my way down the mountain in the early afternoon in an exhausted awkward way. I was 34...by the time I was 36, I was having powerful cataplectic seizures which led to diagnosis.

I cannot do any kind of aerobic exercise because it puts me into a tailspin of tiredness. I do benefit from Hatha yoga  with quiet stretching and core strength moves...I'm talking about the exercise part of yoga since I'm not into meditation.

What happens when you exercise (or not) and are you doing aerobic or non-aerobic exercise? Just curious.

 

P.S. I did not post this at 3:48 a.m.....my computer says 8:48 a.m. (central time)...been noticing something wonky about the times of posts for a couple of days now. Admin????



#2 drago

drago

    Member

  • Members
  • 227 posts

Posted 14 July 2013 - 02:06 PM

I do karate four nights a week (2 hours high-intensity). It alleviates sleep paralysis, hypnogogic hallucinations, and EDS-related things like issues with memory/focus.

 

Initially, it dropped me like a rock. But after doing it consistantly, the tiredness after a workout was more tired muscle than EDS. However, I don't have cataplexy. That might be a factor.

 

drago



#3 Hank

Hank

    Member

  • Members
  • 1,310 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 14 July 2013 - 03:01 PM

My vote is that exercise is GOOD. For me, it helps with everything. Aerobic (run, swim, bike) and strength training are what I stay with- I like the balance. I have, however, taken a break for a while because I had gotten waaay too thin while going through medication changes.

 

My Cataplexy is rarely a problem with exercise. I now avoid things like in-line skating, ice skating and open water swimming. Sudden bursts of exercise are a trigger for my cataplexy. So, fast paced jump rope, sprinting or high-intensity interval  training can make my legs buckle.

 

Anything active is a huge help for me.



#4 DeathRabbit

DeathRabbit

    Member

  • Members
  • 1,290 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Rocket City, USA
  • Interests:Music, video games, exercise, hookah, not feeling like crap

Posted 15 July 2013 - 06:04 AM

Exercise, definitely a plus for sure. For one thing, it keeps you fit which is always good. Secondly, expending that energy helps me fight off the insomnia I sometimes get at night. Healthy eating is also helpful. In fact, I think that's why some have had improvement with gluten-free/paleo diets. Those diets are just healthier by default because it eliminates eating cheap and unhealthy fast food, frozen foods, pastries, etc.



#5 sk8aplexy

sk8aplexy

    Member

  • Members
  • 331 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:IN
  • Interests:Balance & Proportion of Tacos. Care & Respecting. Pools & Concrete Skateboarding. Observing & Contemplating. Future & Traveling. Technology & Evolving. Philosophy & Words...

Posted 15 July 2013 - 01:20 PM

Good.  Just, for me at least, has to be in moderation and at the right time/s.  It does seem to help me sleep a bit better, when I've expended some energy in the day but it can also, if too close to when I try to fall asleep, keep me up and alert for longer...

 

Definitely, to even just get a few miles each day of walking, can make a dramatic effect, versus not hardly walking or doing anything day after day; getting a bit of daily sun, goes a long way with that, too.  Also, I think that doing minor/basic stretching of the limbs with slow breathing (sort of meditating doing such, just focusing on body and counting), can make a dramatic long-term and broad effect.

The two things above, I believe, combined with diet (gluten/dairy free and moderate meat consumption, all organic/local only) have made the biggest impact on bettering everything, and especially my Cataplexy.  One thing though is I can't necessarily say that it has eliminated EDS, as I actually may have more of such, than prior; but I do have less headaches/fatigue/weakness and HH, yet I dream near the entire time I sleep it seems.

 

Running is something that is hard for me, I'd do it more often because it is super good for the body if one can manage it, but it for me results in headaches, just as riding a bike for long does as well.

 

Through my childhood, teens and a lot of my 20's, I did a lot of physical/sport activities, near every single day and for many hours most of those days.

Now, I definitely can not manage more than perhaps a few hours here and there, maybe a few days a week if lucky.  Most weeks, I may get a total of three or four hours, of actual more intense exercise.

Skateboarding (all year) and/or playing ice hockey (during winters) are what I enjoy doing the most (which is a huge part of being motivated to do any of it) but it is too easy for me to go overboard, get carried away and then, or later, find myself with a bad headache or days of such with aching; that's with or without injury from said activity, I don't always fall skateboarding and I don't play hitting hockey, although there are the occasional collisions.

 

The Cataplexy doesn't tend to impact these much, these days thankfully (fingers crossed), but when it is there I have to be extra extra careful, avoid it and/or stop. 

Skateboarding triggered,or triggers, Cataplexy from landing the tricks that I really want, or from others reactions/hollers/smiles (all emotion combined with adrenaline). 

Ice Hockey triggered/triggers are more to do with being so exhausted and/or weak, the Cataplexy can interfere on a break away for instance, or receiving/sending a quick pass. 
For me, Cataplexy doesn't just happen though, without some triggering; unless I am somehow at times not actually picking up on some effect of it (which I must say is very common for me [did that for years and years, adjusting naturally/willingly, attempting to 'not ignore' it, but adjust with or to it, to just let it be and dissipate quickly] I may not actually note something which I should be able to note, it is afterward once I've reflected, or it's been pointed out to me, it can be sometimes shocking..).



#6 Ferret

Ferret

    Member

  • Members
  • 794 posts
  • Gender:Female

Posted 15 July 2013 - 09:38 PM

 

Sk8aplexy said:

"The two things above, I believe, combined with diet (gluten/dairy free and moderate meat consumption, all organic/local only) have made the biggest impact on bettering everything, and especially my Cataplexy.

 

 

You seem to be the only one who is vocal about the dietary changes and I hear ya loud and clear. It certainly made a difference for me too except my changes have been avoiding chemicals. I have tried the gluten/dairy free but with no effect. Have you read about the Ketogenic Diet? I'm asking because you mentioned (in another post) that you are eating fruit which is a source of fructose and is a no no. The Ketogenic diet MAY be the missing link for you...you're doing at least 75% of it now. Check it out and how it is neuro protective.



#7 DeathRabbit

DeathRabbit

    Member

  • Members
  • 1,290 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Rocket City, USA
  • Interests:Music, video games, exercise, hookah, not feeling like crap

Posted 16 July 2013 - 10:53 AM

I would love to try gluten-free and more organic meals. Or at least quit eating processed crap. But I just don't have the time or energy to cook for myself. While I dont think it would cure my Narcolepsy, I'm sure it would help to some degree. It's just not feasible :( . Maybe when my GF moves in with me, because then we can team up for shopping and cooking but I don't know if she'll go for all the healthy stuff because she is extremely thrifty and also very southern. She likes her chicken deep-fried in trans fat and her sweet tea to be about 80% sugar.

 

Be careful with that ketogenic stuff. Even if you intake a lot of fat and protein, you will do damage to your muscle mass overtime (and possible bone density as well), and in general are going to feel weaker with depleted glycogen stores in your muscles. It can also damage your liver with those ketones, if you do it for too long. If you do go ketogenic, I recommend you take frequent holidays from it. Maybe do the classic diet during work week, then load up with what you want on the weekends. That will also help keep your basal metabolic rate from slowing to a crawl. This is why a lot of people who did the Atkins diet for a long time ended up feeling really sickly. Atkins was essentially ketogenic junior.

 

EDIT: Exercise can help alleviate some of the issues with a ketogenic diet, so definitely get plenty, both aerobic and anaerobic.



#8 sk8aplexy

sk8aplexy

    Member

  • Members
  • 331 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:IN
  • Interests:Balance & Proportion of Tacos. Care & Respecting. Pools & Concrete Skateboarding. Observing & Contemplating. Future & Traveling. Technology & Evolving. Philosophy & Words...

Posted 16 July 2013 - 11:56 AM

Wow, ketogenic diet is something I'm not quite ready to do, or sure that I could do; unlikely to do.

I've read slightly up on it at times, and thought to myself "that sure seems extreme."

Fruits are my candies, lately Watermelon has been my fuel.

Is the idea that somehow, by eliminating most glucose there would be some regenesis of hypocretin, or something? (I know it's more thorough and deep, than that description/question..!)

 

Years ago, a friend I had who was very skinny, who didn't eat meat nor drink milk, in a hockey game (I saw) a slap shot hit him in the shin (in knee/shin guard), when he stood up, his shin and ankle bones shattered.  It was horrific, because it was something that happens often, without the shattering of bones.

Since then I've had a fear of certain diets, but I do find myself where I'm at today; I do hope that eating a lot of avocados can help my bones...

 

I'd say that since going dairy free along with gluten free (which on an occasion I do consume either or both, being like once to three times each month, or more likely each couple of months), I've definitely lost weight.  Weight that for the first time in 10+ years had not come off regardless of activity levels (which I did a lot of physical activity trying to shed it, many of those years). 

Since the diet changes though, my overall weight has dropped down to as low as 180, and more or less is steady between 190-200, prior I could not get below 210 and had been above 220, up to 250 years prior.  Unfortunately, I've lessened my activity level/s though since the diet changes. 

 

That is to all in part say though, that I do feel my muscles and bones are very likely, weaker than prior, which is not something I'm excited about. 

But, I did have more general aching in both of them prior, in part from damage/s due to the activities I do, but also obviously from the weight and foods prior.

 

Eating a lot of meat, was how I lived for years and years, now it's all about moderation.

I think it all comes down to a balance with proper proportions, that includes foods/stress/anxieties/exercise/observation/contemplation/reflection/expression/obsession/connection/s.!   ..?