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Could My Daughter Have N?


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#1 Mmartens3

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Posted 09 May 2013 - 09:15 AM

My 12 yr old daughter recently told me of 2 sleep paralysis episodes she had. She said she has not had any Hallucinations although she has very vivid dreams and always describes them in detail. She has a real hard time focusing during the day. I have no doubt that she would dx with ADD if we got her tested. She does get real tired while doing school work but I don't think she is excessively sleepy during the day other than that. She plays outside a lot. She had tons of energy. I think she actually has ADHD. She takes a nap during the day occasionally but not even daily. She has even been staying up later at night than she used to. During the day when I give her instructions to do something, it goes in one ear and out the other. The only way I can get her to do anything to completion is if I stand over her and fuss at her every 5 minutes. If I tell her to do something and she doesn't do it she swears she didn't hear me or that I didn't tell her.

I have recently been dx with N. I had a couple SP/HH episodes under 12 and a couple more in my teens. They didn't come as frequently until I was in my twenties. I didn't have low energy as a child. In fact I never would take my naps and I would stay awake late at night. It wasn't until I was 13 that I started sleeping in class and 14 or 15 when I started sleeping a lot at home during the day.

So for any of you who have kids with N, when did you first start noticing symptoms and did your kids always have EDS or did it start after puberty? and looking back, what were the first symptoms?

#2 DeathRabbit

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Posted 09 May 2013 - 02:21 PM

I think that's just normal teen behavior. :) Developing teen brains need a lot more sleep and are simultaneously becoming more disinclined to do so, due to increased homwork loads and burgeoning social lives. As for not listening to parents, that is also normal teen behavior, haha. I know both me and my brother were like that, and that was long before my N and he doesn't seem to be showing sleep disorder signs at all. Mom would come yell at us to do something and 30 min later she'd come tell us again, and we'd not remember the first time or only remember it after she brought it back up. It's called selective listening, lol. Parents just become so uncool from that 12-20yr old phase, haha. If you're really worried, start including threats of grounding when you issue her a chore and watch how much better she'll listen! Based on what you given me, I'm sure she's just fine :)

 

EDIT: As an added bit of advice, I'd discourage getting her tested for ADD. They'll want to pump her full of Ritalin/Addreall which is lately being shown to harm developmental brains even more so than adult brains, especially making childhood users prone to developing anhedonia, which is medical speak for "I don't give a f*ck about anything" syndrome. The same has been shown about MJ & Alcohol. At early ages, they can do lots of harm, whereas adults who use such responsibly can do so with little to no long term side effects. It's a cruel irony that the times in life in which one is most likely to experiment with mood altering agents are the times they can do the most harm. But yea, my teachers actually tried to twist my Mom's arm in to getting me tested for ADD at age, which was ridiculous, considering I'd go on to graduate 4th in my class in HS and Magna Cum Laude in College (despite burgeoning N symptoms at this point). But her, being RN, was like heck no, I'm not cramming my 8 yr old full of legal speed just because he sometimes gets bored in math class. The reason I was bored was because it was so freaking easy. And I remember sometimes teachers would fail me on tests because they assumed I'd cheated when I just wrote al lthe answers down and turned in the test with now work. I wasn't cheating; I could just multiply two 3 digit numbers in my head.



#3 Mmartens3

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Posted 09 May 2013 - 07:23 PM

Yeah, i guess I'm not too worried about N with her at this point. I just want to stay aware of what's going on with her, in case it does develop in the future - since i can look back and see some signs of N when from my childhood - mainly SP and HH. she seemed a little freaked out about her SP episodes. i explained to her what SP was and told her she should try to get more sleep and to not read so late into the night.

As for her ADD: I am not thrilled about the idea of putting her on drugs but I am really have a hard time with the homeschooling. I do not have the energy to stay on top of her like she needs. And I often fall asleep during school hours and she gets away with not doing her work.

I did not have ADD as a child but my sister did. She does not have N.

I noticed in these kids n such threads that these children seem to have full blown N, not just beginning signs like some of us adults w N did as a child. Wow, these parents have a lot on there hands. They are very strong. These kids a blessed to have such supportive parents. I feel a little embarrassed for asking about my daughter with few if any symptoms.

#4 IdiopathicHypersomniac

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Posted 09 May 2013 - 09:21 PM

Why not send your daughter for a sleep study?  Or, you can test her informally at home using this device ... http://www.myzeo.com/sleep/

 

 

It can measure latency to sleep and sleep onset REM, although I don't think it's as accurate as polysomnography.



#5 DeathRabbit

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Posted 10 May 2013 - 01:17 AM

Their site is still there, but I think Zeo went under. I believe they're just liquidating at this point. I mean it still might not be a bad idea, but it might be problematic with noone being around to support the device going forward or the phone apps that go with it.



#6 Mmartens3

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Posted 10 May 2013 - 02:39 AM

I will definitely consider getting her a sleep study if it becomes more of a problem for her - If I notice worsening EDS or if she complains of more frequent SP along with HH episodes.

I didn't know Zeo went under. That's too bad. Is the price reduced? I will check out the link. Thanks.

#7 Mmartens3

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Posted 10 May 2013 - 02:45 AM

Ok, they don't seem to be selling it directly anymore. They just tell where it is available for purchase.

#8 Hank

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Posted 10 May 2013 - 08:44 AM

You have already noticed a problem. You are concerned, for valid reasons about N or ADHD. As a parent, consider taking action on your concerns.

 

I was very similarly described at that age, and I was not diagnosed with N until age 45. I struggled for years to function normally- I paid a high price for pushing myself so hard.

 

My wife has ADHD and benefits greatly from Adderall. He parents chose not to use medication during childhood. That decision by her parents is my wifes greatest regret.

 

If you suspected your daughter had undiagnosed diabetes, would you wait for it to get worse before seeking medical care?

 

We have 3 children, 2 of them in early teens- I would not hesitate.



#9 DeathRabbit

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Posted 10 May 2013 - 03:15 PM

Yeah, I guess it's a matter of opinion. From what I can tell, there's an equal amount of studies saying that giving kids amphetamines is dangerous, and others say, that while there are risks, the benefits outweigh them and could greatly help their lives overall. One thing that they were all consistent on though was that beginning medication in teen years increases potential for abuse and dependence. So, if you do decide the benefits outweigh the risks, I'd still recommend you be the one in control of the pills. Impulse control in teen years is realtively poor, compared to adults who begin such medications. I know you to be a strong Christian from your other posts, so I'd recommend praying on it and see what God puts in your heart to do. :) Good luck with your daughter. I've no spawn of my own, but I'm given to understand parenthood is constantly full of such hand-wringing decisions as these.

 

EDIT: Ha, I was just reminded of a pithy quote a therapist told me one time that stuck with me. She was like "You shouldn't take medications unless you should take medications."  :lol:  It's funny, but a good way of putting it, lol.



#10 Mmartens3

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Posted 10 May 2013 - 08:45 PM

Thanks everyone for your advise. I am praying about what to do. I think I will at least have her evaluated for ADHD and then consider my options after that.

#11 h.wynn

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Posted 12 May 2013 - 10:56 AM

I have a 10 yearold with ADHD. From what you discribed she is alot like your daugther. The meds do help a bit. She also has  something of a sleep disorder. If she wakes up during the night she cant fall back to sleep. If she wakes up at 3am she is up for the day. She also snors. We had her tonsilles and adenoides removed 2 weeks ago. I havent herd her snore, and she has deen sleeping alot. Her tonsilles were infected and had to come out. We are hoping that this will fix the sleep problems. And with better sleep help with the ADHD.