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Headaches?


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#1 Mmartens3

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Posted 16 April 2013 - 07:38 PM

I get a tension like headache stemming from the back of my head where the base of my skull meets the top of my neck. I get this often after a long nap. A feeling of grogginess accompanies it and it lasts the rest of the day. I feel somewhat refreshed from the nap but the grogginess and headache ruin it for me. Does anyone else experience this?

#2 sk8aplexy

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Posted 16 April 2013 - 08:24 PM

Definitely.  Intense headaches have always plagued me. 

The pain radiates, throbbing, aching, from my neck down into my shoulders and up through, over the top of my head into the back of my eyes.

It can start in my eyes too, and make its way down to my neck.

I used to vomit from them more often and they tended to be more intense when I was younger, but now and then I still get an intense one which makes me vomit.

When they are bad like mentioned above, sleep is all I can attempt, along with icing my neck. 

Sometimes it will be days of on and off, or just dull headache/neck ache.

I know that I've had plenty of injuries from skateboarding, snowboarding and ice hockey in my life, and thus made my neck more prominent as a trigger, but the headaches have been since as far back as I can remember.

Like you though in a way, I can only remain in bed for so long before my neck begins aching, turning into a headache if I don't get up.

I am extremely sensitive to where I sit, and what I sleep upon, even my super nice bed can be bad if my neck is acting up.

Cervical disc degeneration disease or neck arthritis is something I most definitely have, to an extent.

I can't help wonder if there's an aspect of some autoimmune disease or culprit, at play, as I seem to have a plethora of them...



#3 munky

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Posted 17 April 2013 - 04:53 AM

I have this happen, too, if I've spent "too long" in bed ... although the length of time varies. Anyway, what's happening in my case--and may be in yours--is that the muscles of my neck get stiff--or tense--and that sends pain up your spine and into your head and, voila, tension headache! And the headache itself seems to sap my focus and leave me foggy and irritable.

 

The best thing I've found for that kind of headache is to put heat on the back of your neck. Those stick-on heat patches you can get at the drug store are great for this if you're going to be up and moving around, but they also tend to be kind of expensive, especially if you have to use them a lot. And I'm cheap, so if I can sit still, I'll use one of the following alternatives:

  1. Wet a washcloth in hot water an wring it out thoroughly, so no more water is dripping. Roll it up and drape it around the back of your neck (like a scarf).
  2. Get a heating pad set to the highest temperature you can stand, roll it up, and put it behind your neck. This works best if you're sitting in a chair with a high back, which will help hold it in place.
  3. Use a first aid-type heat pack. I've got a couple of heat/cold packs I can use. For cold, you toss them in the freezer, for hot you toss them in the microwave. If you get the kind that come with a fabric covering, you might be able to fasten it around your neck--just don't fasten it too tight!

My sister prefers the rolled-up washcloth. I'll use the heat pack in a pinch, but mine cools off way too quickly, so I prefer the heating pad.



#4 MINItron

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Posted 17 April 2013 - 09:08 PM

I get headaches focused at the back of my neck when my stims are wearing off. I had the same with Ritalin, Provigil, and to a much lesser extent now with Nuvigil.



#5 h.wynn

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Posted 18 April 2013 - 08:18 AM

not shure if these are headachs or not, bot my always eyes hurt. Behind and under them. I thought it was sinus or just being tired. Dose anyone eals have this?

#6 sk8aplexy

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Posted 18 April 2013 - 12:47 PM

h.wynn, I can relate to the eyes hurting. 

I do have a high far sided glasses prescription being around +8 and I have many allergies.

Sinusitis,rhinitis, tinnitus, as well as arthritis; are all no fun and influence, in part, my headaches.

The aches/pain tends to be behind them and of a throbbing sort...

No fun. :/

 

The below is taken from the link: http://www.nisfornar...d-migraine.html

 

"According to one study done in Germany, Narcoleptics get headaches and migraines far more frequently than non-Narcoleptics. 

Having interviewed 68 patients with Narcolepsy for headache symptoms, the study found that a whopping 81% of participants reported headaches that fit the diagnostic profile and 54% of the patients had the profile for migraine (64% women, 35% men).  That is much much higher than stats for the general population.

Even stranger, though, was the finding of another study that said that on average a Narcoleptic who gets migraines or headaches will start to get them about a decade after they first started showing Narcolepsy symptoms.  As one article points out, this suggests that there is some connection between migraines in Narcoleptics and having Narcolepsy.  This was news to me."



#7 Mmartens3

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Posted 18 April 2013 - 02:09 PM

Sk8aplexy, interesting information. That makes sense. Not getting good sleep can trigger migraines. Also I think what munky said is true: if you are laying down a lot and not very active your spine can get out of alignment, causing headaches. I think that is my problem.

#8 Vanessa Elizebeth

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Posted 20 April 2013 - 04:33 AM

Personally never came up with such headache,but i have seen one of my friend is suffering so.



#9 exanimo

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Posted 20 April 2013 - 07:19 PM

Thankfully I don't get headaches very often. My mom gets migraines and so does my brother - I got lucky I guess.

When I do have them I think it's related to my neck being out. But sometimes I get them in my forehead area and thosemones really suck but again, they're infrequent.

#10 munky

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Posted 24 April 2013 - 06:19 AM

I get all kinds of headaches, all the time. Always have. Heck, I almost always have a headache of some sort! But the ones that feel like they start at the base of your skull and work their way up have always, in my case, turned out to be tension headaches, and the heat-pack approach has always been the best fix for them--again, in my case.

 

Now, the ones where it feels like someone is stabbing you in the head with an ice pick, or the ones that feel like someone is inside your skull and trying to break out with a sledgehammer ... those, I have no good fix for, aside from medication and just not moving much.

 

Then there's the ones that aren't really quite a headache yet, but you can feel them sort of lurking somewhere in your head, just waiting to pop out and slam the pain down ... those annoy me the most, because I've never found anything you can do for them but wait to see what kind they'll become.

 

And migraines are a whole different story.



#11 sk8aplexy

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Posted 24 April 2013 - 10:45 AM

Nice descriptions Munky.  I can relate to all of it, although in my case ice is what tends to work (as I've said above, perhaps a couple of times), I will try heat one of these times though.

 

Mine definitely changed over time, though still remain.  They can be like having a balloon inside my skull being inflated and deflated, along with my eyes doing the same. 

 

If I rub my eyes and/or pop my neck, at all too much (I must always be conscious of how often I do such, to not continue), the headache does come...

 

I can also say that since cutting out gluten for the most part (and I think that is more specific to the certain sugars, perhaps salts and of course flours too which are used so often; am not celiac, but definitely sensitive), has really lessened the amount and/or frequency of the dull continual annoying, lurking, headaches which can be there for days or weeks.



#12 DeathRabbit

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Posted 24 April 2013 - 10:52 AM

Mine usually start behind the eyes, then radiate either to the cranium or to the jaw. They usually coincide with horrible brain fog, but sometimes I just get that same headachey, foggy feeling with no pain at all. I think the brain fog/confusion is a type of neuropathic pain, and it only sometimes extends out to where we actually feel it in our sensory neurons. Or some such like that. I've heard other people say that before, but it gained a lot of credence with me when I started lamictal for the headaches and the fog disappeared as well, for the most part. I'm still kinda fuzzy due to the EDS, but I no longer feel like I have the idiot brain of a chimpanzee on a day to day basis.



#13 Mmartens3

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Posted 24 April 2013 - 11:41 AM

my headaches usually originate at the base of my skull and radiate behind my ears and then to my forehead and behind my eyes. I also get pain in my sinus cavities. The pain was so bad at one point I went to the ER. I ended up going to the Chiropractor 3 times a week getting adjustments and massages. After 3 months I finally started seeing results. Now I get adjustments and massages once a week. I still get the headaches frequently but they arent as bad and it isnt constant like it was. The headache often comes back after I nap for too long.

#14 DeathRabbit

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Posted 24 April 2013 - 11:48 AM

Very cool. I am praying that my drugs keep working. So far, it seems like the 200mg Lamictal XR is doing wonders, but in the back of my mind, I'm like "But for how long, how long." My emotional health could use some working on too. I've never been happy. No matter what anyone has ever done for me, or how good things go, I just at best feel neutral. My brain is emo, stupid emo brain.



#15 Mmartens3

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Posted 24 April 2013 - 01:31 PM

DeathRabbit, I hope your meds keep helping with your headaches and I hope you can be happy someday. Sometimes I think I should be happier than I am. I have a wonderful husband and great kids but I just feel so apathetic sometimes.