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Argument On Why Research In This Area Needs To Swiftin Up.

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#1 RKINDIG

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Posted 11 April 2013 - 03:13 PM

I am currently working on a rogerian argument about narcolepsy and the advancement of treatment.

 

General Description of the Purpose: "In this paper, I plan to convince the general population of college students and professors studying medicine that, narcolepsy is a serious, misunderstood, and unrecognized disorder that can affect ones quality of day-to-day life, and medicine needs faster research, for the sake of the next generation. Narcolepsy is a fairly new sleep disorder, and there aren’t many people with parents with narcolepsy, but many children are starting to get diagnosed with narcolepsy and if medicine doesn’t further, their children will be severely affected."

 

I just need help or more information about how I can go about writing this paper. My mother was diagnosed with narcolepsy right before I was born, and information is hard to find.

 

IF YOU WANT TO CONTACT ME ASAP, YOU CAN REACH ME AT MY EMAIL RYAN.KINDIG@GMAIL.COM, otherwise i'll be checking up as much as possible!



#2 DeathRabbit

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Posted 11 April 2013 - 04:14 PM

I would suggest hitting JSTOR or some repository of scholarly publications. There are a lot of potential cures out there for narcolepsy out there that have shown promise in experiments and trials, but noone has brought them to fruition, due to the limited market for such a cure. It's much better for big pharma to keep us on symptom treatment, rather than fixing the root cause of the symptoms. The most promising was a nasal spray that acts as an orexin/hypocretin agonist that could pass through the blood brain barrier. There was also some animal experimentation done that showed it's possible to take one's own adult stem cells and tease them in some way and implant them in the right place in the hypothalmus to repair the damage. The obvious downside to that cure is the risky business of brain surgery, plus cost thereof, but for people who are completely disabled because of N it might be worth it to them. Another promising thing that hasn't been properly explored is H3 agonists. These seem to have nootropic effects that even exceed Nuvigil and Provigil. Good luck with your paper.



#3 Sisu

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Posted 23 April 2013 - 08:54 AM

I don't think it's a benefit to big pharma to keep us sick. The profound goodwill- not to mention the influx of funding- that would happen with a cure is too big a payoff for people or companies to ignore. The problem is that things that work in mice may not work in people, and it's dangerous to experiment on brains. It takes a long time to prove something safe.

 

That said, there should be more communication between researchers in addition to more research. I'm most curious about the use of external stimuli (light, magnets, electricity) to induce brain states, because the possibility of an enforced sleep pattern would be close to a cure.

 

 

Please share the paper when you finish it. Try your local library for free JSTOR access- the research desk will know what you're talking about and show you how to use theirs!



#4 DeathRabbit

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Posted 24 April 2013 - 10:28 AM

 Yeah, except Narcolepsy is an orphan disease. But while we'd rejocie if there was a cure, the world at large woudl be completely oblivious. Hence why curing it for them would be a bad business move. It'd be different if it was something like cancer, aids, MS, or something that has high visibilty and worse symptoms. I'll go with the classic adage "It's enough to just do good, you have to be seen doing good."



#5 sk8aplexy

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Posted 24 April 2013 - 10:50 AM

The use of the word 'normal' in terms of test and being examined, drives me nuts. 

It may not relate to the topic but I feel like the obvious, is often thrown out the window, because according to test one is normal.

What is it to be normal, between 18-65 years of age?  With or without, this or that?

I know it's all complicated, but such seems to break certain abilities to pinpoint and/or focus in; that is unless you're beyond (¿I don't know what word to use, or what word/s should be used?) point of repair, like (often or can be) with cancer, MS and such...

Maybe, I'm too simplistic?



#6 Heidi L

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Posted 27 April 2013 - 10:20 AM

For a summary and explanation of the current scientific literature on Narcolepsy and Orexin-  you might want to read my research.

 

I've been in remission for five years.    Many other people are too.



#7 sk8aplexy

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Posted 27 April 2013 - 04:03 PM

I've read a lot of, most all of, your site.

I've done, I think, most all of or near to what it is you speak.

It has not made my Narcolepsy nor Cataplexy disappear into remission, unfortunately.

It has helped in ways but definitely, it remains.

I appreciate it though and am not saying such to put you down.