drago

Sleep Paralysis Cause

5 posts in this topic

Hello fellow NN members:

 

I keep finding articles related to the following research:

http://media.utoronto.ca/media-releases/health-medicine/study-identifies-how-muscles-are-paralyzed-during-sleep/

 

While this is interesting, of course, what I'd really like to know is what actually causes the sleeping DISORDER sleep paralysis. I mean, how the muscles are paralyzed at night is important, sure, but I want to know why I become conscious while the muscles are paralyzed... the trouble is, the is no special name for the disorder, and that is slowing my research down considerably...

 

Right now, all the "causes" of Sleep Paralysis Disorder are listed as "stress" and "jet lag" and stuff like that -- but I'm not interested in that, I want to know about neurochemicals or protiens or peptides that are related to the disorder, if any are known.

 

Has anyone come across anything about what causes people to become conscious during REM state? i.e. low amount of a neurochemical?

 

 

drago

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In my understanding, sleep paralysis has to do with dopamine regulation in REM sleep, and it's similar to Cataplexy in that your body is confused about where you are in your sleep cycle.  Dopamine is released in REM sleep to keep you from acting out your dreams and responding to dream stimuli. In Narcoleptics all this sleep cycle business is haywire, and your body can misinterpret waking stimuli as that of dreams. Sleepwalking and REM Behavioral Disorder are the opposite. I don't think that sleep paralysis is particularly being "conscious during REM state", as much as it is the result of Narcoleptics (and others) having no barrier between wakefulness and REM sleep. An average brain cycles into REM after first wave sleep, and out of it after third wave deep sleep, so I think this perception of being conscious while dreaming is due to the lack of allotted time for the body to adjust. 

 

The Wikipedia page has a lot of great information on the subject as well as links to studies and such: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sleep_paralysis

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On 4/13/2013 at 9:12 PM, allysmith said:

In my understanding, sleep paralysis has to do with dopamine regulation in REM sleep, and it's similar to Cataplexy in that your body is confused about where you are in your sleep cycle.  Dopamine is released in REM sleep to keep you from acting out your dreams and responding to dream stimuli.

Does it really? I have REM sleep Behavioral Disorder (RBD), and I'm being evaluated for narcolepsy, because I have those symptoms, and video evidence of severe cataplexy. Do you have any literature on this? 

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Take your pick...

https://www.google.com.mx/?gfe_rd=cr&ei=1Ef6U7e6MsbK8geSnoCgBA&gws_rd=ssl#q=Dopamine+regulation+in+REM+sleep

@Omicron

I applaud your interest in learning everything you can. However, you are dredging up a lot of very old threads and asking questions of people who have not posted in a very long time so you are unlikely to get a response.

If you click on a member's name, it will give you information as to when they lasted visited the board. Allysmith last visited on May the 14th, 2014.

 

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Thanks @Ferret; I already googled that, and found little to nothing regarding dopamine and sleep paralysis (but there's plenty on REM sleep and Parkinson's). REM sleep with atonia involves dopamine, but the sleep paralysis- namely, when you wake up paralyzed- doesn't seem to have a lot of scientific literature on it that I can find. I don't suffer from sleep paralysis, but a friend does, much to his confusion. It's likely he has sleep apnea, but I was trying to get more info on the neurochemical science on that. 

I am aware this is an old thread; I have commented on other old threads and had luck, so I figured that the only way to be certain not to get an answer would be if I didn't bother trying. 

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