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#1 DeathRabbit

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Posted 02 April 2013 - 12:11 PM

Does anyone here ever get to where they are just feeling really spaced out and can't focus, even when they aren't that sleepy? I've been having more and more spells lately where I'll just feel plain weird and wont be able to concentrate, but there's not really that much of a sleepiness/fatigue feeling associated with it. Any ideas or people who've had similar occurences?



#2 DeathRabbit

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Posted 02 April 2013 - 04:47 PM

Okay, I feel better now. But I hate these episodes. It was like the same feeling one gets from inhaling too much helium from a party balloon tank in order to do that funny high pitched voice. Or if you paint for too long with the doors closed. Or if someone opens an old Expo marker in your office. I am wondering if I'm having hypoxic events or something.



#3 Outcast031

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Posted 02 April 2013 - 11:45 PM

I know what you mean. Actually when I posted my question in regards to people suffering from social anxiety this "Brain Fog" issue is a big part for why I am so anxious when dealing with people (Especially customers in the work place) I feel like I am floating from the outside and listening to the conversation partly as an observer. I tried describing this to the doctor but he dismissed it as not important. 

 

On the bright side I have found it hasn't gotten any worse. On top of that I also find it seems to be triggered more often by whether or not my blood sugar is fluctuating. Most of the time I answer people correctly while spacing in this way but occasionally my train of thought completely derails "Who am I again?" and I have to stutter and look silly as I try to get back on track. It does feel pretty uncomfortable even the times when I don't slip up. This is partly because there's nothing I can do to pull myself out of the fog and I know it.



#4 Megssosleepy

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Posted 03 April 2013 - 08:00 AM

That happens to me all the time.  I never used to have any trouble concentrating if someone was telling me a story, I used to be a pretty good listener.  Now a days I unintentionally block out whatever they are saying, and just have to nod and smile like I can connect their words together.  It happens even when I know I need to listen.  Its like I need to blink a bunch and shake my head to snap out of it. 

 

I hate it!  It almost feels like a sleep attack without the sudden need to sleep... if that makes sense?  



#5 DeathRabbit

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Posted 03 April 2013 - 09:46 AM

It must be some neurochemical deficit due to the lack of SWS I'd have to guess. I really wanna go for a spinal tap now, just so some of these mysteries can be solved. My sleep doc was slightly concerned by this symptom, but not enough to actually do anything about it. All he does at my appointments is aks me if I'm sleepy and if I'd like a new stimulant or Xyrem again. I told him neither, but I acquiesed to try Vyvanse. Pretty sure it wont fix the spacing out tho.



#6 Megssosleepy

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Posted 03 April 2013 - 03:08 PM

I feel like after getting my Dx my doc isnt good for much except renewing my script for Xyrem.  

 

I tried Vyvanse and it was pretty much that same BS as adderall XR, but then again it seems I am just super sensitive to all stimmies.

 

Have you ever tried going gluten free?  I have heard that it clears brain fog, but it can take months for the gluten to be completely out of your system.  So, its not a quick fix!  I think one day I may try it... just not right now gluten foods are cheap and easy. lol  



#7 DeathRabbit

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Posted 04 April 2013 - 09:20 AM

I really doubt it would help unless I have coeliacs disease.I'm just skeptical about how 10 years ago noone had ever had heard of gluten and now it's the biggest thing ever. It seems like another Atkins craze.



#8 Outcast031

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Posted 04 April 2013 - 07:03 PM

I actually did try the gluten free diet to see if it helped. I must admit that I had more good days then I did bad days. But based on the results I must question whether or not it had anything to do with the gluten aspect or a different element of the foods I was avoiding.

 

Remember what I told you about blood sugar in my previous post? I have been tested and my blood sugar is supposedly fine, I am not pre-diabetic and yet the food I eat seems to have at least some correlation with the brain fog problem. The most common part of this seems to be how much the food inhibits the blood flow. My brain fog and the sudden bouts of sleepiness are also effected by the room temperature. The colder it is then the more alert I seem to be. Hot environments can make me lethargic. 

 

Of all the tests all they discovered was that I am definitely lactose intolerant. I didn't react to any other foods or common allergies. But I will also add that my stomach is terrible and has been for years. My blood sugar is fine but I will get occasional sensations that resemble a person whose blood pressure is spiking. (with no lab results to prove what I claim to be feeling)

 

The point is that there are so many variables to consider. So many possibilities of whether one of my issues is the byproduct or cause of another. I read a book with a corny title "Fatigued to Fantastic" and while it didn't make me a full on believer it posed a theory on how our eating habits and stress caused us to basically blow a fuse. In this line of thought we screwed up our biological cycle kept in balance by our glands and should all have a few added but inconsistent abnormalities as a sign of this. I have read several individual books that can point the blame to our ailments on our adrenal glands, our immune system, our thyroid, our Pineal gland, ect. 

 

On the other hand I have read three books on eastern medicine that suggest that our ailments are caused by a chemical imbalance that was created by stress and our skewed, bitter and ultimately depressive perceptions of ourselves and the world around us. (This subject is mirrored in western medicine as cognitive behavioral therapy) Basically the eastern perspective in simple terms is that our process of learning is part spiritual but part biological. You practice something and your brain creates neural pathways to fire your electrical synapses more effectively allowing you quicker and sharper reactions when doing a task that you find yourself repeating often. That's why some things become automatic for us when we learn. Problem is that our brains don't just learn how to perform physical tasks in this way, our mental and emotional responses are tied to this as well. If you slap me in the face as a reward but give someone else a gift. Then you come in and say its time for your reward, that person will create dopamine and they will have happy feelings. but my negative experiences will create something different. what I create will likely be equivalent to a negative emotion and those chemical changes have numerous effects on the body. When I get stressed I get sleepy. I am easily stressed because i'm sleepy all the time and its become a habit. 

 

So as you see there are unfortunately many variables.



#9 DeathRabbit

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Posted 05 April 2013 - 09:33 AM

That's kind of my theory. Most gluten free food ends up being a lot helathier, considering most of it is made to market towards health conscious individuals. So yea, eating healthier will always make you feel better. And mental health issues can act as a force multiplier on N symptoms for sure; I've witnessed this myself. I refuse to believe that unhealthy eating and stress can be the sole root cause of all of our problems, however. I mean, evolutionarily speaking, it doesn't make sense, considering we're all still cavemen on the inside, and I guarantee you they didn't always get to shop at Trader Joe's or Earth Fare. And I'm guessing constantly trying not to freeze to death or get eaten by bears stressed them out. So it makes no sense that an out of balance diet could do this much damage.



#10 sk8aplexy

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Posted 05 April 2013 - 11:08 AM

Yet, the food industry sure likes to follow the tobacco industries lead...

http://www.independe...ts-8490815.html

http://e360.yale.edu...g_tobacco/2136/

http://www.yaleruddc...Foodtobacco.pdf



#11 DeathRabbit

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Posted 05 April 2013 - 11:15 AM

Yea, and you got states passing stuff like this: http://www.greenisth...-fracking/6825/

 

Not to mention our Dear Leader, who is supposed to be all about the common man and all concerned for our health, jumping in bed with Monsanto: http://planetsave.co...protection-act/



#12 sk8aplexy

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Posted 05 April 2013 - 11:54 AM

I hear you, and am all too familiar with IN... =/

Let's push the envelope a bit further!:

http://www.coasttoco...show/2013/03/30

 

The times are fascinating, as well as, scary.



#13 salomeforever

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Posted 12 April 2013 - 07:43 PM

Oh man, this is the #1 thing that I get most depressed about (and we all know depression isn't great for your mental aptitude). 

I've always been extremely bright scholastically. In high school I never had to study, I could be doing homework for another class in a class and still retain everything I heard.  When I started to realize something was really wrong with me, right before I started pursuing a diagnosis, my first cue was that I couldn't read the way I used to. I was a huge bookworm my whole life, it identified me.  I still struggle with this, I struggle with both physically keeping my eyes on one line (does anyone else have this? I'm going to post a new thread on it) and retaining what I've read. It's been incredibly upsetting and damaging to my self-perception and self-esteem.  

 

When I first started Adderall, I felt like my old self again, better even.  It made me feel like the very best version of myself, I was quick in conversation, I breezed through writing assignments, and I could articulate my thoughts in ways I thought had been totally lost. I had a beautiful and perfect semester and felt sure I had really hit my stride as an artist.  With the big Adderall shortage a year ago, i ended up being on it and off it like 3 months in succession and became intensely depressed, and it's taken me a while to get back on track.  I'm back on my preferred 10 mg three times a day, and while the initial feelings of perfection aren't there anymore, it certainly helps, and it's the only treatment I've found that also improves the brain fog problem, and not just wakefulness.    



#14 DeathRabbit

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Posted 15 April 2013 - 09:28 AM

Yeah, the reading thing. It's still tough, even though I feel better now. It's like I can't keep my mind on track.



#15 2Tired4This

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Posted 15 April 2013 - 06:29 PM

I still experience the reading thing on my off days. To me it was always like...

 

"ok.. reading reading.. reading.. sentence.. sentence..

 

 

crap now im lost.

 

 

searching... searching..... what was I reading about again?.... searching...

 

 

ah there it is!... reading.. reading.... reading...

 

 

...... &$!# not again..... I swear I was on that line.... where did it go again...

........ ah..... wait that sentence doesnt make sense I think I skipped a line a again..

.........ugh forget it ..."

 

 

 

 

You could read a whole paragraph and not even remember what it was about two seconds later.  

 

It's absolutely detrimental for people like us. Oh and if you are a slow reader, forget about it. There is no help for you. I actually find it more useful to skim on those kinds of days.

 

I think something that goes along with this is the whole "finding the right word" problem that some of us have too. It seems like no matter you can't remember any of the beautiful vocabulary that you had stored up. You know what you are trying to say, and you know how you want to say it, but the word itself just disappeared from your mind. It's excruciating when you are trying to express yourself.