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Telling Your Employer You Have N???


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#1 N50+

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Posted 13 February 2013 - 10:51 PM

Has anyone told their employer about their N? If yes, did you speak with HR or your immediate boss?
I have been teetering on this issue since being diagnosed 18 months ago -mostly due to being afraid of losing job if they figure out how much they are paying for xyrem.
Not sure if it would be worth it, would only do so to get an office closer to home or perhaps even work from home a day or more a week. Currently driving over an hour each way in rush hour -it's brutal! Couldn't do it without medicinal assistance but that too comes with its own price.
Any input greatly appreciated.

#2 DeathRabbit

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Posted 14 February 2013 - 04:49 PM

I think firing you for your health care usage is illegal, but we all know how they skirt around those laws. If you are wanting to make an official claim and request some consideration for your illness, I would recommend going to HR first. If you are just wanting to let people know, so they think won't you are lazy or whatever, I guess I would tell your boss, provided he's not a jerk. My boss has been fairly sympathetic to my plight, but that's because he's had serious health issues of his own and also struggle with poor sleep quality, though nowhere near my level. Most of the people I work with know, but I've never done the HR thing, partially because I already have a flexible schedule and partially because I live in Alabama, where they can fire you for not liking your face. Even though the ADA protects N somewhat, I'm pretty sure if they really wanted to get rid of me, they could do an end run around it pretty easily.



#3 N50+

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Posted 14 February 2013 - 08:59 PM

"Right to work" State is a misnomer. It should say "right to fire" because that's what it really is. I think it protects employers far more than employees. Anyway, that is exactly my concern even if going the HR route. Still thinking on that one, leaning towards not saying anything unless some situation that benefits me comes along.

#4 munky

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Posted 15 February 2013 - 01:15 AM

I talked to my supervisor, because I'd previously been getting in trouble for falling asleep at work, and told them I was going to the doctor to find out what was wrong. Also, my neurologist suggested a nap every 4 hours, and I wanted to make arrangements for that with my supervisor (in my car as much as possible, in an empty office if the weather makes that dangerous).

 

Afterward, he and I both sent the info up to HR, and we both got lectured about it. Him for a HIPAA violation for even mentioning it to HR after I talked to him, and me for talking to him and not HR. According to our HR rep, it's better to talk to them to make whatever arrangements need to be made rather than dealing with the supervisors directy so that, when a new position/project/possibility of promotion comes up, the supervisor doesn't have Narcolepsy in the back of their minds while they're considering whether or not you'd be suitable. Then again, it seems to me it'd be even worse to have them remembering you kept falling asleep and not know the reason why, since then all they've got to go on is that you keep sleeping at work.

 

Still, I think whether or not you choose to tell anyone depends a great deal on the people you work with, the environment you work in, and any accomodations you need.



#5 HiredandFired

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Posted 20 February 2013 - 10:35 PM

Yes. I told my HR Manager who was also my boss. I was "let go" in November without a single corrective action in my file. The reason was "position elimination". My job is currently posted to be filled. During my termination, I was handed a paper with a lump sum "severance" payment with a "you can't sue us" agreement attached to it.

Never again.

#6 doinmdarndest

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Posted 23 February 2013 - 05:14 AM

do not tell your boss you have n. you have nothing to gain by doing so, and doing so could cost you your job.

#7 DeathRabbit

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Posted 25 February 2013 - 10:11 AM

Yes. I told my HR Manager who was also my boss. I was "let go" in November without a single corrective action in my file. The reason was "position elimination". My job is currently posted to be filled. During my termination, I was handed a paper with a lump sum "severance" payment with a "you can't sue us" agreement attached to it.

Never again.

You might still be able to sue, not sure. As a general rule of thumb, you can't sign your rights away and N is protected by the ADA. I might be more trouble than its worth though. But two of my lawyer family members have told me that most "you can't sue us" clauses are utter bullcrap.



#8 MINItron

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Posted 26 February 2013 - 01:03 AM

You might still be able to sue, not sure. As a general rule of thumb, you can't sign your rights away and N is protected by the ADA. I might be more trouble than its worth though. But two of my lawyer family members have told me that most "you can't sue us" clauses are utter bullcrap.

 

It's been a few years since my business law class in college, but my professor then said the same thing. Indemnity clauses are generally just there to scare people away from lawsuits, and to prevent frivolous lawsuits. Only a lawyer can really advise you on your actual case, but I know I would be hopping mad if I were terminated because my position was removed and then they turned around and advertised for a replacement I would be looking for a lawyer, indemnity clause or not.