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What To Do About Work?


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#1 Lotor

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Posted 23 January 2013 - 06:57 PM

One of hundreds of similar threads I'm sure.

 

I am only 20 years old, and in the past 3 years N has laid ruin to the plans I had for post-secondary school. So it's time to make new ones!

Which careers would you guys suggest? I have nothing on my resume but service industry jobs, so I've got to go to school if I want to get a job that will suit my limits. 



#2 munky

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Posted 24 January 2013 - 12:01 AM

I work full time and go to school part time. I have to strictly manage my schedule--work, school and sleep--to have any hope of actually managing, but so far I've managed a 4.0 GPA. That may change with Calculus I this semester ...

 

This semester, the first I signed up for after my Narcolepsy diagnosis, I'm only taking 2 classes, both of them online. The Calculus class wasn't available on-campus at any time that would match my work schedule, so that's online. The Biology is a "hybrid" course, mostly online but with a weekly 2-hour lab on one of my days off. So far, I'm managing, but I'm already falling a bit behind in Calculus. Not having a lecture to attend is really affecting my ability to understand it. I just don't do well with most math classes ... But, we'll see.

 

I'm working on a BS in Computer Science with a specialization in programming. I love writing code for fun. I love the intellectual stimulation, and I think it'll help alot with the EDS. My current job, I sit for 12 hours sitting at a computer and waiting for something to break so I can fix it. Very boring. Very hard to fight off the EDS, even with scheduled naps and meds.



#3 Lotor

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Posted 26 January 2013 - 08:15 PM

I work full time and go to school part time. I have to strictly manage my schedule--work, school and sleep--to have any hope of actually managing, but so far I've managed a 4.0 GPA. That may change with Calculus I this semester ...

 

This semester, the first I signed up for after my Narcolepsy diagnosis, I'm only taking 2 classes, both of them online. The Calculus class wasn't available on-campus at any time that would match my work schedule, so that's online. The Biology is a "hybrid" course, mostly online but with a weekly 2-hour lab on one of my days off. So far, I'm managing, but I'm already falling a bit behind in Calculus. Not having a lecture to attend is really affecting my ability to understand it. I just don't do well with most math classes ... But, we'll see.

 

I'm working on a BS in Computer Science with a specialization in programming. I love writing code for fun. I love the intellectual stimulation, and I think it'll help alot with the EDS. My current job, I sit for 12 hours sitting at a computer and waiting for something to break so I can fix it. Very boring. Very hard to fight off the EDS, even with scheduled naps and meds.

That, is one of the most impressive things I've ever heard. Good on you, munky! Though I have to say that it leaves me a little discouraged. I certainly can't imagine myself functioning at that level, I went from an honors student to barely passing, and I had to take an extra year to complete high school; and that was only school, no work. But I guess it's important to be optimistic.

 

Let's rephrase the question: does anyone have suggestions about what kind of career a barely functioning (but persevering) PWN could pursue?



#4 munky

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Posted 26 January 2013 - 08:53 PM

It's hard. It's very, very hard. Especially since I got put on 12-hour shifts. Yes, that means I get 3 days off one week, and 4 the next, but since I generally spend the first of those days in something approaching a coma with occasional bouts of semi-consciousness, the extra time off doesn't help a lot. I'd rather be on 8-hour shifts with the ability to attend a class after work ...

 

I think what does help is that I've had sleep and other health issues all my life, and I've always just ... fought through them. I could outstubborn a mule when I'm fighting for something I want, and I really, really want to be able to change careers. I hate what I'm doing now. The new career may not be everything I hope for, but it should at last be intellectually stimulating. A half-trained monkey could do my current job most of the time--and some of the people I work with are almost that intelligent.

 

To find the best career for you, the first thing you should consider is what you enjoy doing. Do you enjoy helping people? Teaching? Talking on the phone? Writing? Programming? Making things? Designing things? Make a list, and put it in order from the things you like most to the things you like less, but could still be happy doing. Then, consider what career paths might let you do one or more of those things you like, and make another list. Cross-referencing them can help.

 

Once you have the list of career paths, consider the types of jobs in those paths and how they'll fill your needs. ("Computer Science" is a career path. "Programmer" is a job on that path. Or, conversely, "Programming" could be a career path with "game programmer," "database programmer," and other things as jobs.) Again, cross-referencing it can be very helpful.

 

Once you have that list, consider the circumstances you'll experience in the jobs on your list, and what effect they'll have on the EDS. Does being intellectually stimulated help you fight the fatigue/EDS? Look at the more intellectually challenging jobs, the ones where you have to figure things out--that's what I'm doing with going into programming, as one example. Another is making various types of repairs, whether on vehicles or, say, plumbing: you have to figure out what's wrong and how to fix it, then do the work. Would it be better for you to be up and moving? Look at jobs that don't involve sitting at a desk for hours at a time. That could be anything from retail to nursing. Does it help you to be surrounded by people? Look for a job that can give you that. Look at combinations of factors. If talking on the phone and constantly meeting new people is good for you, but sitting at a desk for hours isn't, it might be best to avoid working as a receptionist, but being a hostess or waitress at a restaurant might be right up your alley.

 

As an example of what I mean by "cross-referencing" these lists:

 

 

Things I like       Careers                         Jobs                                              Notes

 

Writing

                          Journalism                    Reporter                                        Dealing with people all the time: bad!

                          Teaching                       English teacher                             Dealing with students all the time: bad!

Computers

                          Programming                Programmer (various)                  Intellectual stimulation, creating new things, less human

                                                                                                                          interaction: good!

                          Networking                    Network engineer                          Intellectual stimulation, less human interaction: good!

                                                                                                                          Creating known things: eh.

                          Support                         Help desk                                      Dealing with people all the time: bad!

Astrophysics

                          Astrophysics                 Astrophysicist                               A lot of intellectual stimulation, less human interaction:

                                                                                                                          good! Not many jobs: bad.

                          Teaching                       College professor                         Dealing with people all the time: bad!

Making things

                          Jewelry                          Making/selling  jewelry                  Creating new things: good! Dealing with people/sales: bad.

                          Small carpentry             Making/selling objects                  Creating new things: good! Dealing with people/sales: bad.

                                                                (boxes, shelves, tables, etc.)

 

 

ETA: That should be a little easier to read, I hope ...



#5 Lotor

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Posted 31 January 2013 - 06:02 PM

It's hard. It's very, very hard. Especially since I got put on 12-hour shifts. Yes, that means I get 3 days off one week, and 4 the next, but since I generally spend the first of those days in something approaching a coma with occasional bouts of semi-consciousness, the extra time off doesn't help a lot. I'd rather be on 8-hour shifts with the ability to attend a class after work ...

 

I think what does help is that I've had sleep and other health issues all my life, and I've always just ... fought through them. I could outstubborn a mule when I'm fighting for something I want, and I really, really want to be able to change careers. I hate what I'm doing now. The new career may not be everything I hope for, but it should at last be intellectually stimulating. A half-trained monkey could do my current job most of the time--and some of the people I work with are almost that intelligent.

 

To find the best career for you, the first thing you should consider is what you enjoy doing. Do you enjoy helping people? Teaching? Talking on the phone? Writing? Programming? Making things? Designing things? Make a list, and put it in order from the things you like most to the things you like less, but could still be happy doing. Then, consider what career paths might let you do one or more of those things you like, and make another list. Cross-referencing them can help.

 

Once you have the list of career paths, consider the types of jobs in those paths and how they'll fill your needs. ("Computer Science" is a career path. "Programmer" is a job on that path. Or, conversely, "Programming" could be a career path with "game programmer," "database programmer," and other things as jobs.) Again, cross-referencing it can be very helpful.

 

Once you have that list, consider the circumstances you'll experience in the jobs on your list, and what effect they'll have on the EDS. Does being intellectually stimulated help you fight the fatigue/EDS? Look at the more intellectually challenging jobs, the ones where you have to figure things out--that's what I'm doing with going into programming, as one example. Another is making various types of repairs, whether on vehicles or, say, plumbing: you have to figure out what's wrong and how to fix it, then do the work. Would it be better for you to be up and moving? Look at jobs that don't involve sitting at a desk for hours at a time. That could be anything from retail to nursing. Does it help you to be surrounded by people? Look for a job that can give you that. Look at combinations of factors. If talking on the phone and constantly meeting new people is good for you, but sitting at a desk for hours isn't, it might be best to avoid working as a receptionist, but being a hostess or waitress at a restaurant might be right up your alley.

 

As an example of what I mean by "cross-referencing" these lists:

 

 

Things I like       Careers                         Jobs                                              Notes

 

Writing

                          Journalism                    Reporter                                        Dealing with people all the time: bad!

                          Teaching                       English teacher                             Dealing with students all the time: bad!

Computers

                          Programming                Programmer (various)                  Intellectual stimulation, creating new things, less human

                                                                                                                          interaction: good!

                          Networking                    Network engineer                          Intellectual stimulation, less human interaction: good!

                                                                                                                          Creating known things: eh.

                          Support                         Help desk                                      Dealing with people all the time: bad!

Astrophysics

                          Astrophysics                 Astrophysicist                               A lot of intellectual stimulation, less human interaction:

                                                                                                                          good! Not many jobs: bad.

                          Teaching                       College professor                         Dealing with people all the time: bad!

Making things

                          Jewelry                          Making/selling  jewelry                  Creating new things: good! Dealing with people/sales: bad.

                          Small carpentry             Making/selling objects                  Creating new things: good! Dealing with people/sales: bad.

                                                                (boxes, shelves, tables, etc.)

 

 

ETA: That should be a little easier to read, I hope ...

Makes sense. I wasn't able to pursue what I really like to do, but I've never made such a comprehensive list. It's worth a shot, thanks!



#6 munky

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Posted 01 February 2013 - 04:35 AM

Makes sense. I wasn't able to pursue what I really like to do, but I've never made such a comprehensive list. It's worth a shot, thanks!

 

Just because you can't pursue that passion now doesn't mean you won't be able to later. Narcolepsy can be incredibly hard to adjust to! You may have to spend some time doing something you don't like as much while you find ways to accomodate the Narcolepsy and the treatments, and you may reach the point, later, that you can pursue that passion. Or it may turn out that what you thought of as "second best" is actually perfect.

 

Alas, I can't take credit for the list. I reached a point in my current career where I just ... hate my job and see no way forward. When I talked about it with my mother, she suggested the list. It helped me to decide to go back to school and work on a programming degree, and I only help a similar list can be of help to you in figuring out where to start.