Jump to content


Photo

Sleep Tracking


  • Please log in to reply
7 replies to this topic

#1 munky

munky

    Member

  • Members
  • 213 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:near Little Rock, Arkansas
  • Interests:Too many to list. It takes up too much space.

Posted 30 November 2012 - 06:22 AM

So, I'm wondering if tracking my sleep will prove useful. I've attemtped to do so in the past, before I was diagnosed with narcolepsy, but I never found a method I really liked. Still haven't. I have an app on my phone that I can use, and have been using for a bit, but even that has issues and I'm still on the lookout for other methods.

Tonight, while at work, I did a little looking. There are devices, like the Lark and the FitBit that are supposed to track your sleep and wake you "gently" at the "optimum point" of your sleep cycle ... but they only thing they measure is movement, so I have to think that their coding is based entirely on "are you moving" and "are you not moving". Since I also have RBD, that's not entirely useful, so I'm not inclined to use those.

Then there's the Zeo, which is a headband with, basically, a very minimal EEG built into it. There are only three sensors that go across your forehead, so it isn't anywhere near as accurate as a PSG, and you have to make sure the headband is snug enough that it won't move around while you sleep, but it's supposed to give you at least an estimation of when you're in light, deep, or REM sleep, or when you're waking up. You can either get a clock with a memory card so you can upload the data through your computer, or you can get a device that interacts with smartphone.

I'm considering trying the Zeo. It's got a 30-day money back guarantee, and it seems, of everything I've seen, the most likely to provide useful data. I'm hoping it can show me how any changes I make in diet, exercise and medication (hopefully not for a long time to come) affect my sleep. I do NOT expect the data to be clinically useful, just something I can use to see if anything I'm doing appears to be making any difference.

So, have any of you tried any of these devices? Or do you track your sleep in any other ways? What works for you?

munky

#2 cloudtalk

cloudtalk

    Member

  • Members
  • 28 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Maryland

Posted 01 December 2012 - 03:28 PM

I got a free app for my phone that I used for a while called SleepFit. You record the hours that you sleep each day, and the quality you think it was. It tells you how far off you are from your ideal amount of sleep today and this week. It also has an alertness test so you can compare how alert you are during different times of the day. I used it for a couple weeks, and it helped me get a better sense of my sleep patterns, but then I got sick of recording all the hours I slept. I mean, at first it was interesting and I saw ways I could improve my sleep schedule, but then it was just the same thing over and over again. So, I'd recommend trying it or some other app if you want to track your sleep for free.

#3 stoic

stoic

    Member

  • Members
  • 28 posts

Posted 05 December 2012 - 07:10 AM

I love my Zeo.

I realise and accept doctors probably see it as a bit of a toy. My sleep doc said he wasn't necessarily happy about how the device interprets the data it captures, but he did agree it was a good way to objectively monitor your sleep and get a good overview of how you're sleeping.

I don't use it in an attempt to improve my sleep. They have a whole program and scoring system around improving your sleep. I try to ignore that (but they do give some useful sleep hygiene tips) as I figure it could just lead to anxiety around sleep and make it worse. But I think it's a great way of tracking my sleep and the data may really be useful in the future.

It's really easy to use (I have the mobile version for iPhone) and is quite comfortable.

There is also an online journal so you can record the variables you're adjusting (naps, meds, diet, exercise, etc.) and see what if any effect they are having.

I'd definitely recommend it!

#4 munky

munky

    Member

  • Members
  • 213 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:near Little Rock, Arkansas
  • Interests:Too many to list. It takes up too much space.

Posted 06 December 2012 - 02:25 AM

I've been using an app on my phone called SleepOnIt. It records your sleep times and puts it in a cute little chart, but it's only recording times, not how you're sleeping. You can enter notes, and you can enter some medications--though they're missing most of the meds I've read about people taking here. Seems like those'd be the ones you'd want in an app like that!

I don't plan on paying much attention to their scores, and I know all the sleep hygiene stuff. My sleep hygiene is good. It's just my sleep that isn't! I really just want to monitor my sleep and see if any of the changes I make to diet/lifestyle actually make a difference--for better or worse. Considering that I've never had what a normal person might call a "good night's sleep," I really don't know how to judge how well I'm sleeping.

I'm really leaning toward the Zeo now. Thanks for the info!

#5 Arrow2

Arrow2

    Member

  • Members
  • 17 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Roseville mn
  • Interests:Photography, dogs, and keeping my day job.

Posted 26 January 2013 - 05:32 PM

I have been using a fitbit since september and find it very useful. I know there are others out there that might be the same or better.

 

I created a fitbit group on thier site for narcoleptics if anyone does get one and wants to share sleep data. Let me know and I will invite you

 

 

Easy to sync info to their website and the sleep tracking is more sophisticated than just movement i think. search the fitbit site for sleep accuracy and you get a lot of user experiences. Here is one post I found useful:

 

I work for a Sleep Diagnostic services company. We have over 45 sleep labs, currently. Near as I can tell the FitBit uses a technology similar to wrist actigraphy. (Acutally, I would be surprised if it was not actigraphy). As I understand, actigraphy has been used primarily with narcolepsy and insomnia patients. Although we do not use sole actigraphy in any our sleep labs, it does appear to have its clinical merits when it comes to tracking “wakes” and “sleeps.” Actigraphy cannot tell you the quality of sleep you are getting or be used, solely, to diagnose a sleeping disorder. It can, however, be an effective tracking tool and can be used to collect useful data to take to your Board Certified Sleep Physician for referral for further diagnostic testing. Quality sleep is crucial for overall wellness and health. There are critical cellular rebuilding processes your body goes through during stages of sleep. If you are noticing a significant number of “wakes” it may be worth your time to evaluate your sleeping habits. If you sleep with Fluffy or Fido, it may be best to move them to the floor. If you consume caffeine within 3 hours of bedtime, you may wish to consider changing that behavior. If you make some simple behavior changes and still have significant “wakes” call your local Board Certified Sleep Physician or a local AASM accredited sleep center (http://www.sleepcenters.org/ to find an accredited center near you). You will want to make this call immediately if someone you tells you that you snore, or if after a “full nights sleep” you wake up still not feeling “refreshed.” These are symptoms that indicate you could have Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA). OSA is directly correlated with obesity, high blood pressure, heart disease, diabetes, GERD, etc. If you have more questions about sleep, try the National Sleep Foundations website (www.sleepfoundation.org). I love my FitBit and I love the “wake” and “sleep” function. It’s one of the reasons I opted for this device over some of the other ones on the market. I can tell you we have had LOTS of fun “testing” the functions of the FitBit at work! So far, so good! Enjoy and Sleep Well!



#6 munky

munky

    Member

  • Members
  • 213 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:near Little Rock, Arkansas
  • Interests:Too many to list. It takes up too much space.

Posted 26 January 2013 - 09:43 PM

From Wikipedia:

 

Actigraphy is a non-invasive method of monitoring human rest/activity cycles. A small actigraph unit, also called an actimetry sensor,[1] is worn by a patient to measure gross motor activity. Motor activity often under test is that of the wrist, measured by an actigraph in a wrist-watch-like package. The unit continually records the movements it undergoes. The data can be later read to a computer and analysed offline. In some applications, such as the Fitbit or the WakeMate, the data is transmitted and analysed in real time. 

 

So, it basically measures how much you're moving. In most cases. That would be a reliable method of predicting sleep cycles, because in most people, the brain shuts down voluntary muscle movement when you're in REM sleep (or when it thinks you are, hence: SP). In fact, I have several friends who use them and love them. I, however, also have RBD (REM behavior disorder), which means my brain does not shut down voluntary muscle movement when I'm sleeping. I'm constantly moving in my sleep, and even sometimes act out my dreams, without ever actually waking up. So, it seems to me that sort of measurement isn't going to be terribly effective in my case. That's the reason I'm considering the Zeo, instead. (Yeah, still considering. Company messed up our paychecks, and I have to let that get sorted out before I spend the extra money.)



#7 rossBU

rossBU

    Member

  • Members
  • 1 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:USPSA, hunting, fishing

Posted 04 April 2013 - 01:15 AM

Don't go buy a zeo just yet. I read that the company is going out of business.

I have a zeo and have been using it for about 6 months now. I love what it does and it at least makes me feel better about my sleep by giving me somewhat of an idea of what's going on. I realize it may not be perfectly accurate but it is an easy way to see how much sleep I'm getting on average.

However, now that zeo is going away, I'm looking for a different device. I've still been using my zeo, but now I'm second guessing its usefulness. If it was accurate, I feel like more people would be using it and therefore keep zeo in business. I'm currently looking into a fitbit type device, but I'm not really sure how useful it would be to track my movements at night. I'm a very deep sleeper and wheni fall asleep, I don't move very much...

#8 munky

munky

    Member

  • Members
  • 213 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:near Little Rock, Arkansas
  • Interests:Too many to list. It takes up too much space.

Posted 11 April 2013 - 02:43 AM

That's the point of the actigraph. The times when you aren't moving are when it will score you as being asleep, so it should work wonderfully for you.

 

My problem with that is the opposite. I'm a very active sleeper, and because I have RBD, I actually act out certain types of dreams ... which the actigraph would score as being awake, making actigraphy inaccurate for my use. Now, with Zeo out of business (Thanks for pointing that out, rossBU! I hadn't known about it.), I'm glad I didn't buy one ... but I'll be on the lookout for something I can use.