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Parent Addicted To Meds


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#1 HELP

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Posted 21 November 2012 - 07:20 PM

Hello,
I am in the middle of a chaotic situation. My parent is addicted to and abusing medication meant for Narcolepsy.
I am going to give as little information as possible as I don't want to give any information that may effect my parent. Sorry about this.

Okay, So my parent has had N/C for the better part of 35 years. Undiagnosed for ten. Had a complete and total shut down of normal life. Couldn't work at all etc. A very severe case from what I understand.

All I have known is my parent this way so I have had nothing to compare what was her Narcolepsy VS drug addiction. I had always assumed what I was seeing was Narcolepsy, but now I know a good amount of it was actually due to being high as a kite.

Now I am in the position of facing the possibility of "ratting" her out to the Neurologist...but my fear is the medication is taken away from her completely and then left with nothing to help cope with the Narcolepsy.

Thoughts? advice?

#2 Hank

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Posted 21 November 2012 - 11:40 PM

Hello,
I am in the middle of a chaotic situation. My parent is addicted to and abusing medication meant for Narcolepsy.
I am going to give as little information as possible as I don't want to give any information that may effect my parent. Sorry about this.

Okay, So my parent has had N/C for the better part of 35 years. Undiagnosed for ten. Had a complete and total shut down of normal life. Couldn't work at all etc. A very severe case from what I understand.

All I have known is my parent this way so I have had nothing to compare what was her Narcolepsy VS drug addiction. I had always assumed what I was seeing was Narcolepsy, but now I know a good amount of it was actually due to being high as a kite.

Now I am in the position of facing the possibility of "ratting" her out to the Neurologist...but my fear is the medication is taken away from her completely and then left with nothing to help cope with the Narcolepsy.

Thoughts? advice?



If you have these concerns, speaking to your parent's neurologist is the right call. It is not "ratting out" to express your concern. The neurologist is responsible for making his/her own decisions based on the information. If you need some support for yourself, this link may be helpful http://www.nar-anon....-Anon_Home.html

#3 HELP

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Posted 22 November 2012 - 01:10 PM

I can appreciate what you are saying and I know it to be the "right" thing to do. But at the same time, the current medication is the only one that has worked. The prospect of being taken off it for something else that either didn't work or something that may not work is a huge risk.
I know the current situation is FAR from ideal as well....but damned if I do damned if I don't kind of situation.
We currently have it under lock and key and doling it out according to the original prescription, but the withdrawal symptoms are awful. Shaking, vomiting, cramping etc etc etc.
I think a hospital should be the place to detox off it, but that would require the Neurologist be involved.

What I now know is that a lot of years of life were wasted in a med induced haze....narcolepsy or not!

#4 Hank

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Posted 22 November 2012 - 02:46 PM

I can appreciate what you are saying and I know it to be the "right" thing to do. But at the same time, the current medication is the only one that has worked. The prospect of being taken off it for something else that either didn't work or something that may not work is a huge risk.
I know the current situation is FAR from ideal as well....but damned if I do damned if I don't kind of situation.
We currently have it under lock and key and doling it out according to the original prescription, but the withdrawal symptoms are awful. Shaking, vomiting, cramping etc etc etc.
I think a hospital should be the place to detox off it, but that would require the Neurologist be involved.

What I now know is that a lot of years of life were wasted in a med induced haze....narcolepsy or not!



If you are damned if you do and damned if you don't, that may make it easier. The reason I recommended that website is so that you could get support. When something is complicated, simplify it to the bottom line. Your loved one is abusing a medication and you know help is needed- bottom line. I suggest you get suport for yourself through an established recovery group like NA. If you are looking for help with substance abuse, that is what they do.


Keep it simple. Get help. First, get support and education for yourself with a group like Narc-anon- they support family members of substance abusers. Then, when you are ready with the support of NA, get help for your parent.

#5 trying_to_cope

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Posted 22 November 2012 - 03:56 PM

Hello,
I am in the middle of a chaotic situation. My parent is addicted to and abusing medication meant for Narcolepsy.
I am going to give as little information as possible as I don't want to give any information that may effect my parent. Sorry about this.

Okay, So my parent has had N/C for the better part of 35 years. Undiagnosed for ten. Had a complete and total shut down of normal life. Couldn't work at all etc. A very severe case from what I understand.

All I have known is my parent this way so I have had nothing to compare what was her Narcolepsy VS drug addiction. I had always assumed what I was seeing was Narcolepsy, but now I know a good amount of it was actually due to being high as a kite.

Now I am in the position of facing the possibility of "ratting" her out to the Neurologist...but my fear is the medication is taken away from her completely and then left with nothing to help cope with the Narcolepsy.

Thoughts? advice?


couple things, first what is the drug exactly? And how do u know they are abusing it?

#6 HELP

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Posted 22 November 2012 - 08:21 PM

Hank:

Thanks for the insight and link.
I will look into that.

"T T Cope"
I don't even want to tell the name of the medication as I have no idea who reads this ...could be the Dr. Could be someone from the Pharma co. and could piece it together.
But every hour pretty much around the clock was not out of the norm...considering it was supposed to be 4 times in a set period.

Does anybody have a link to a current list of meds being used?
I'd at least like to know what options might be available when things go sideways.

Thanks.

#7 trying_to_cope

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Posted 23 November 2012 - 11:10 AM

Hank:

Thanks for the insight and link.
I will look into that.

"T T Cope"
I don't even want to tell the name of the medication as I have no idea who reads this ...could be the Dr. Could be someone from the Pharma co. and could piece it together.
But every hour pretty much around the clock was not out of the norm...considering it was supposed to be 4 times in a set period.

Does anybody have a link to a current list of meds being used?
I'd at least like to know what options might be available when things go sideways.

Thanks.


Have u tried bringing it up to your Mom first before telling the doctor? Maybe if you confront her first about the misuse and threaten that you're going to tell the neurologist that might actually resolve the situation. Not only could telling cause things to get ugly between the two of you but it could cause her a lot of problems later trying to manage her disease. If after talking to her and telling her these things it still doesn't improve I would then tell the neurologist. Best of luck to both of you.

#8 HELP

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Posted 23 November 2012 - 09:47 PM

Hi TTCope,
Oh..yes I have brought this up and she is fully aware and cooperating with the "new med regime" and suffering the withdrawal.

My concern is the medication might need to be completely out of the body then reintroduced as prescribed to get the desired effect.

Still looking for an up to date meds list.

Thanks.

#9 HELP

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Posted 29 November 2012 - 03:45 PM

So for anybody who cares:

The withdrawal symptoms are much better after a week and a half!
Pretty shaky by the end of the day, but the looking at the clock literally every minute to see if 6 hours has magically passed and it's dose time is no longer the reality.

Not to say everything is okay now, but this is a massive improvement over two weeks ago.

#10 Hank

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Posted 29 November 2012 - 07:39 PM

So for anybody who cares:

The withdrawal symptoms are much better after a week and a half!
Pretty shaky by the end of the day, but the looking at the clock literally every minute to see if 6 hours has magically passed and it's dose time is no longer the reality.

Not to say everything is okay now, but this is a massive improvement over two weeks ago.


So glad you are weathing that storm. Please keep in mind that when there is an addiction, the addiction does not end when withdrawal is over. Until the Addict surrenders, and the addiction is treated, a relapse with that drug or another is a very real possibility.

I hope you have gotten help from a recovery support group like NA- that will help you to help your parent.

#11 HELP

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Posted 30 November 2012 - 11:31 AM

Hi Hank,

We are well aware that the addiction will not be over just because the shakes have stopped. We will simply never let go of the control and dosing of the medication. She is closing in on 70 years old, so we would probably have to take control of all medication soon anyway as the early signs of dementia are showing. So it is what it is.

Thanks.

#12 Hank

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Posted 30 November 2012 - 12:06 PM

Hi Hank,

We are well aware that the addiction will not be over just because the shakes have stopped. We will simply never let go of the control and dosing of the medication. She is closing in on 70 years old, so we would probably have to take control of all medication soon anyway as the early signs of dementia are showing. So it is what it is.

Thanks.



Thank you for those details. Without knowing the ages of you or your mother, I thought you were a teen doing this for your parent. I completely understand, given your circumstance. As a parent myself, I was concerned for what a teen might be going through without support. I am so glad you are an adult.

#13 HELP

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Posted 30 November 2012 - 03:12 PM

Well Hank.... I'm not glad I'm an adult!

This being an adult is for grown ups!
;)

#14 munky

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Posted 01 December 2012 - 12:30 AM

So glad to hear that things are at least starting to look up, though I'm equally sorry your family has had to go through this.

As someone mentioned previously, support at times like this can be essential. We're here for you, but sometimes face-to-face support is better. If Narc-Anon is not the way you want to go, try looking for support groups for caregivers. These days, there are a lot of people caring for aging parents at home, and with the number of medications some of them have to take, I'm sure there's someone out there who's been through similar circumstances and would be able to tell you what to expect, or even just give you a sympathetic ear and a shoulder to lean on when you need it.

It can be hard to seek out that kind of help, I know. I've never been a social person, and due to issues unrelated to narcolepsy, I don't like being in a room full of strangers, or having to join a group of strangers. When I have to, I have a very hard time speaking to them, even just to introduce myself. Still, I'm hoping to find some fellow narcs in my general area so we can get together and talk, because I know that this is going to be a difficult thing to live with and just talking to someone who's in the same boat can be a huge relief. I mean, my mother understands, but ... she's my mother, you know?

munky