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Lucid Dreaming And Narcalepsy


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#1 CATxi

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Posted 13 November 2012 - 10:49 AM

instead of having to rewrite this experience in here(its pretty lengthy) im just going to copy and paste, so if it seems a little like a story from a book thats why(im writting a short story about my life before i was diagnosed as a way of venting i spose)

(before i got diagnosed with narcolepsy i was having some recurring nightmares.)

i did some dream research and stumbled across a lucid dream video. it stood out to me because it had said you could wake your self up in case of a nightmare. i jumped right on the ball and got to writing my very own dream journal. my dreams started getting more and more vivid. they became so vivid that they were better then any hdtv i had ever seen, better then seeing through my own eyes. It was amazing and I looked forward to going to sleep every night, but with vivid dreams came vivid nightmares, very vivid and very detailed, horrible disturbing nightmares, and I still was not able to control any of them. so i researched some more . I found a technique called w.i.l.d. that was s posed to induce lucidity.
i immediately tried it the next morning. i did exactly as it said. i was sure i would find myself in a layer one lucid dream, or at the very least a regular dream, but i woke up. it didn't work. i was disappointed. but then i looked beside me. "why is my baby nephew, cole sitting here just staring at me?" i thought to myself. i looked around my room in confusion. "what the?..why is my whole room turned around, my bed was on the other wall when i went to sleep...wait a minute, something isn't right" i looked back at cole...he started to smile...his smile got bigger and bigger until i could see all his teeth."weird" i whispered quietly to myself. then noticed all his teeth turning to points. his eyes twisted in an unnatural way, his ears rose from the side of his face to the top of his head in one swift motion and the round ends turned into sharp points."omg i'm dreaming! i gotta get out of here" i couldn't move, not one bit. i looked back at my nephew, whos fair skin had started turning a deep shade of red, and was very angry. his arms rose and his tiny finger nails slowly grew long and sharp and thick. he looked as though he was ready to pounce at any moment. "ok self" i said "you can do this!", and with all my energy i tried to lift my body up..it was no use. i couldn't even move an inch. cole had started to smile even bigger now. then he growled. adrenaline seemed to have kicked in a little more and i tried one last time to sit up..i was straining myself so much i began to shake and flush and sweat. i yelled, "wake up!" with all the energy i had left. i started to rise off the bed, and fast. i thought i might fling myself right across the room. everything went black.
i opened my eyes. i was still laying down? how could this be? i was practically flying in mid air! i looked beside me. cole was gone. relief set in. i looked around. my room was back to normal thank goodness. but could i move again? i started with my finger. it twitched. so i lifted my hand and then my arm. i could move again, but not with ease. every muscle in my body was sore. it stayed that way for the remainder of the day.

has anyone ever tried lucid dreaming or any of the techniques? did they trigger a sleep paralysis episode or make your hillucinations worse? maybe its just a giant coincidence but id rather be sure before attempting anything to do with lucid dreaming again. since then i stopped writting a dream journal and everything just in case. ive always read that it was safe and woulnt cause any harm, but what about people with a sleep disorder? i really like remembering my dreams and making them more vivid but if i have to go through that again i would rather not dream at all

#2 Hank

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Posted 13 November 2012 - 01:39 PM

instead of having to rewrite this experience in here(its pretty lengthy) im just going to copy and paste, so if it seems a little like a story from a book thats why(im writting a short story about my life before i was diagnosed as a way of venting i spose)

(before i got diagnosed with narcolepsy i was having some recurring nightmares.)

i did some dream research and stumbled across a lucid dream video. it stood out to me because it had said you could wake your self up in case of a nightmare. i jumped right on the ball and got to writing my very own dream journal. my dreams started getting more and more vivid. they became so vivid that they were better then any hdtv i had ever seen, better then seeing through my own eyes. It was amazing and I looked forward to going to sleep every night, but with vivid dreams came vivid nightmares, very vivid and very detailed, horrible disturbing nightmares, and I still was not able to control any of them. so i researched some more . I found a technique called w.i.l.d. that was s posed to induce lucidity.
i immediately tried it the next morning. i did exactly as it said. i was sure i would find myself in a layer one lucid dream, or at the very least a regular dream, but i woke up. it didn't work. i was disappointed. but then i looked beside me. "why is my baby nephew, cole sitting here just staring at me?" i thought to myself. i looked around my room in confusion. "what the?..why is my whole room turned around, my bed was on the other wall when i went to sleep...wait a minute, something isn't right" i looked back at cole...he started to smile...his smile got bigger and bigger until i could see all his teeth."weird" i whispered quietly to myself. then noticed all his teeth turning to points. his eyes twisted in an unnatural way, his ears rose from the side of his face to the top of his head in one swift motion and the round ends turned into sharp points."omg i'm dreaming! i gotta get out of here" i couldn't move, not one bit. i looked back at my nephew, whos fair skin had started turning a deep shade of red, and was very angry. his arms rose and his tiny finger nails slowly grew long and sharp and thick. he looked as though he was ready to pounce at any moment. "ok self" i said "you can do this!", and with all my energy i tried to lift my body up..it was no use. i couldn't even move an inch. cole had started to smile even bigger now. then he growled. adrenaline seemed to have kicked in a little more and i tried one last time to sit up..i was straining myself so much i began to shake and flush and sweat. i yelled, "wake up!" with all the energy i had left. i started to rise off the bed, and fast. i thought i might fling myself right across the room. everything went black.
i opened my eyes. i was still laying down? how could this be? i was practically flying in mid air! i looked beside me. cole was gone. relief set in. i looked around. my room was back to normal thank goodness. but could i move again? i started with my finger. it twitched. so i lifted my hand and then my arm. i could move again, but not with ease. every muscle in my body was sore. it stayed that way for the remainder of the day.

has anyone ever tried lucid dreaming or any of the techniques? did they trigger a sleep paralysis episode or make your hillucinations worse? maybe its just a giant coincidence but id rather be sure before attempting anything to do with lucid dreaming again. since then i stopped writting a dream journal and everything just in case. ive always read that it was safe and woulnt cause any harm, but what about people with a sleep disorder? i really like remembering my dreams and making them more vivid but if i have to go through that again i would rather not dream at all



I have lived my entire life, essentially, with undiagnosed Narcolepsy and Cataplexy. I have to look back into my childhood and teenage years to remember the really bad dreams. While I never researched techniques in Lucid Dreaming, I seem to have found a way to do it somehow. In early college, I would wake up in panic and gasp, but could not remember the dream. Around that time, I began to participate in my dreams.

My Lucid Dreams today are more like "How To" videos. When I was renovating our kitchen, I planned much of it in my dreams. I solved problems and planned where things would go. If I didn't like it, I could just start over. I have planned a new deck and patio- still in my head waiting for the budget to recover from the kitchen, which turned out great.

I like participating in my dreams but it is not something I have ever tried to explain to others- it sounds too far fetched. When I started Xyrem on the low dose, I kept pulling myself out of REM sleep for some reason. I knew I was dreaming and kept climbing out of REM into groggy sleep paralysis. I am thankful that is over. I have not remembered a Lucid Dream in over 2 months, and I do miss them. But I also have not pulled myself out of REM either. I can live with these restful, uneventful nights.

The only tip I can offer is that I just do not allow nightmares. If my dreams start heading that way, I have found a way to be really objective about it- that is not the dream I am going to have. One of my hobbies is dog training- especially formerly abused dogs, to help them recover. I put the dog "on command", keeping them in step with me on the leash, so we develop a rhythm and a trust. I keep a short leash and make frequent small corrections and keep walking through distractions. I never focus on the dog pulling, I just focus on moving forward and making gentle corrections. Either I am leading or the dog is leading- the better I lead, the more the dog wants to follow. When the dog follows, he puts his trust in me. That trust is essential in his recovery- and it all starts with kindness, a leash and a good walk.

It seems I have found a way to keep REM on a short leash as well. I can't tell you how I did it, I just did. I have found a way to lead my dreams. I will decide where this dream is headed and it will be someplace I want to be- none of this nightmare business. I think that has also made me a stronger person when I am awake, also. I think a true sign of strength is when a person becomes strong enough to be gentle. Even in a dream.

I would suggest, start training your mind during the day. Don't give your dreams any power by focusing on the fear of the nightmare- it is just a dream afterall. Make sure the gentle strength of your mind is leading you during the day. Awake is a good time to train your mind so you are ready for your dreams. I hope you find a way to take your dreams where you want them to go- asleep and awake.

#3 CATxi

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Posted 13 November 2012 - 02:08 PM

I have lived my entire life, essentially, with undiagnosed Narcolepsy and Cataplexy. I have to look back into my childhood and teenage years to remember the really bad dreams. While I never researched techniques in Lucid Dreaming, I seem to have found a way to do it somehow. In early college, I would wake up in panic and gasp, but could not remember the dream. Around that time, I began to participate in my dreams.

My Lucid Dreams today are more like "How To" videos. When I was renovating our kitchen, I planned much of it in my dreams. I solved problems and planned where things would go. If I didn't like it, I could just start over. I have planned a new deck and patio- still in my head waiting for the budget to recover from the kitchen, which turned out great.

I like participating in my dreams but it is not something I have ever tried to explain to others- it sounds too far fetched. When I started Xyrem on the low dose, I kept pulling myself out of REM sleep for some reason. I knew I was dreaming and kept climbing out of REM into groggy sleep paralysis. I am thankful that is over. I have not remembered a Lucid Dream in over 2 months, and I do miss them. But I also have not pulled myself out of REM either. I can live with these restful, uneventful nights.

The only tip I can offer is that I just do not allow nightmares. If my dreams start heading that way, I have found a way to be really objective about it- that is not the dream I am going to have. One of my hobbies is dog training- especially formerly abused dogs, to help them recover. I put the dog "on command", keeping them in step with me on the leash, so we develop a rhythm and a trust. I keep a short leash and make frequent small corrections and keep walking through distractions. I never focus on the dog pulling, I just focus on moving forward and making gentle corrections. Either I am leading or the dog is leading- the better I lead, the more the dog wants to follow. When the dog follows, he puts his trust in me. That trust is essential in his recovery- and it all starts with kindness, a leash and a good walk.

It seems I have found a way to keep REM on a short leash as well. I can't tell you how I did it, I just did. I have found a way to lead my dreams. I will decide where this dream is headed and it will be someplace I want to be- none of this nightmare business. I think that has also made me a stronger person when I am awake, also. I think a true sign of strength is when a person becomes strong enough to be gentle. Even in a dream.

I would suggest, start training your mind during the day. Don't give your dreams any power by focusing on the fear of the nightmare- it is just a dream afterall. Make sure the gentle strength of your mind is leading you during the day. Awake is a good time to train your mind so you are ready for your dreams. I hope you find a way to take your dreams where you want them to go- asleep and awake.


thank you. before this happened i have never been able to distinguish my dreams as dreams. as weird as they seemed i never questioned it. that is why i kept a dream journal, so that i could start looking for my dream signs. im seeing alot of people with narcolepsy are able to control their dreams more easily then others. so looking back now its not a surprise that the first time i tried to induce lucidity it worked. it takes normal people months to accomplish.

but heres my problem. in order to be able to control my dreams i have to keep a dream journal. which means my dreams will start to get even more vivid like before. which will also bring on nightmares. so do i just keep going until i learn how to do it and risk another sleep paralysis episode? i know the long term out come is worth it. but its just so scary for me. and im afraid its going to get worse before it gets better. and i do not ever want to experience that ever again.

#4 Hank

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Posted 13 November 2012 - 07:03 PM

but heres my problem. in order to be able to control my dreams i have to keep a dream journal. which means my dreams will start to get even more vivid like before. which will also bring on nightmares. so do i just keep going until i learn how to do it and risk another sleep paralysis episode? i know the long term out come is worth it. but its just so scary for me. and im afraid its going to get worse before it gets better. and i do not ever want to experience that ever again.



You are the best person to decide what will work for you. I never kept a dream journal, so I have nothing to offer on that topic. My sleep paralysis is seldom and does not scare me, so I do not fear it. I do know that when I fear something, that usually scares me more and intensifies the fear. My bottom line is - a dream is a dream - it has no power or control over me. And, not to minimize it, but Sleep Paralysis, while unpleasant will not harm me- as long as it happens in the safety and comfort of my own bed. Consider loosening your grip on this and it might come together more easily. You will need to be calm, relaxed and you sound a little too wound-tight about this right now. Relax into it and be gently strong with yourself. Fear gives way to fear, strength builds upon strength.

#5 CATxi

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Posted 13 November 2012 - 07:50 PM

You are the best person to decide what will work for you. I never kept a dream journal, so I have nothing to offer on that topic. My sleep paralysis is seldom and does not scare me, so I do not fear it. I do know that when I fear something, that usually scares me more and intensifies the fear. My bottom line is - a dream is a dream - it has no power or control over me. And, not to minimize it, but Sleep Paralysis, while unpleasant will not harm me- as long as it happens in the safety and comfort of my own bed. Consider loosening your grip on this and it might come together more easily. You will need to be calm, relaxed and you sound a little too wound-tight about this right now. Relax into it and be gently strong with yourself. Fear gives way to fear, strength builds upon strength.




its not just a dream if your body reacts as though it was real. i mean it is still a dream obviously, but it is a really big deal. when someone says "its just a dream" i feel like they're belittling my feelings. i know its hard to see someone elses point of view so i try not to let it bother me too much. but when that happened, my entire body was sore all day from it. what do you think it did to my mind? ive read stories that said people have gotten ptsd just from a dream, because even though it wasnt real, your body still reacts the same way. it all seemed so real. ive never experienced a dream like this. usually when you wake up you can tell it was a dream because it just felt different or looked different. even though i know it was a dream, when i look back it feels like it actually happened.

now if this is just a fluke then i would really like to continue, but if this is going to happen every time i try then i wont even bother. it would be nice to be able to wake myself up though. and the vivid good dreams were amazing and i really think it helped reduce my stress. i looked forward to bedtime. now im scared to sleep.

#6 CATxi

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Posted 13 November 2012 - 07:54 PM

its not just a dream if your body reacts as though it was real. i mean it is still a dream obviously, but it is a really big deal. when someone says "its just a dream" i feel like they're belittling my feelings. i know its hard to see someone elses point of view so i try not to let it bother me too much. but when that happened, my entire body was sore all day from it. what do you think it did to my mind? ive read stories that said people have gotten ptsd just from a dream, because even though it wasnt real, your body still reacts the same way. it all seemed so real. ive never experienced a dream like this. usually when you wake up you can tell it was a dream because it just felt different or looked different. even though i know it was a dream, when i look back it feels like it actually happened.

now if this is just a fluke then i would really like to continue, but if this is going to happen every time i try then i wont even bother. it would be nice to be able to wake myself up though. and the vivid good dreams were amazing and i really think it helped reduce my stress. i looked forward to bedtime. now im scared to sleep.



but honestly im over the experience, i really only put it in there for reference. my main concern is that the technique i tried seemed to have triggered it. and i was hoping to get someone on here who has had lucid dream knowledge cause i cant seem to find anything that has N with lucid dream info. ive read that its not dangerous, but cant find anything to do with any type of sleep problems so i cant be sure.

#7 Hank

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Posted 13 November 2012 - 08:57 PM

its not just a dream if your body reacts as though it was real. i mean it is still a dream obviously, but it is a really big deal. when someone says "its just a dream" i feel like they're belittling my feelings. i know its hard to see someone elses point of view so i try not to let it bother me too much. but when that happened, my entire body was sore all day from it. what do you think it did to my mind? ive read stories that said people have gotten ptsd just from a dream, because even though it wasnt real, your body still reacts the same way. it all seemed so real. ive never experienced a dream like this. usually when you wake up you can tell it was a dream because it just felt different or looked different. even though i know it was a dream, when i look back it feels like it actually happened.

now if this is just a fluke then i would really like to continue, but if this is going to happen every time i try then i wont even bother. it would be nice to be able to wake myself up though. and the vivid good dreams were amazing and i really think it helped reduce my stress. i looked forward to bedtime. now im scared to sleep.


So sorry- I did not mean in any way to belittle your feelings or minimize your experience. I empathize. I lived with the intensity of those kind of dreams during my childhood and teenage years. I was finally diagnosed at age 45 in May 2012. When I say "it's just a dream"- that is what I have told myself over and over for many years beginning in childhood, so that I did not live in fear of closing my eyes to sleep at night.

I am not saying that those kind of dreams are not scary. The feelings are real. When I tell myself it is "just a dream", it diminishes the power that fear has over me. I actively choose not to give any power over to a dream- I will not give my emotional energy to a dream. That is a decision I made a long time ago and I have stuck with it.

I am not telling you how to do this- I am just telling you how I have done it. I am self taught through trial and error with no extra points for style. There surely must be a more refined way to Lucid Dream and I hope others will offer you some tips to follow.

#8 CATxi

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Posted 13 November 2012 - 10:00 PM

So sorry- I did not mean in any way to belittle your feelings or minimize your experience. I empathize. I lived with the intensity of those kind of dreams during my childhood and teenage years. I was finally diagnosed at age 45 in May 2012. When I say "it's just a dream"- that is what I have told myself over and over for many years beginning in childhood, so that I did not live in fear of closing my eyes to sleep at night.

I am not saying that those kind of dreams are not scary. The feelings are real. When I tell myself it is "just a dream", it diminishes the power that fear has over me. I actively choose not to give any power over to a dream- I will not give my emotional energy to a dream. That is a decision I made a long time ago and I have stuck with it.

I am not telling you how to do this- I am just telling you how I have done it. I am self taught through trial and error with no extra points for style. There surely must be a more refined way to Lucid Dream and I hope others will offer you some tips to follow.


o , no. i know you didnt mean it that way. i know you have more of an idea when it comes to this stuff then someone without N. but i do truly feel that dreams that real have some kind of effect on you wether you tell yourself it doesnt.
beside having a very disturbing hillucination when i was 4 i really diddnt experience this sort of thing until i was in basic training at 18(or at least i dont remember.i WAS very scared to sleep at night although i cant recall why). and even after that i never had this vivid of a dream before, so its still a little new to me. which is why i thought the wake induced lucid dreaming (WILD) technique triggered the sleep paralysis) i has also been doing the excersises they tell you to do to improve vividness, so i didnt know if it was my narcalepsy that caused this or the lucid dreaming excersises/wild. or maybe a little of both. i have emailed a person that has experience but im not sure he can answer anything about sleeping disorders. i really need someone who has expireince with both.