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Does Cataplexy Cause Chest Pain?


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#1 drago

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Posted 07 November 2012 - 11:09 PM

I have been having weird chest pain -- and I have ruled out literally dozens of possibilities. Right now my doctor things it's gastrointestinal / acid reflux thing.

It ONLY happens when I take a deep breath through the mouth... they tested me for anxiety-related issues because it happened "under stress," but of course it does, because I take more deep breaths when I am under stress -- either physically working out or stressed by work. It's a relaxation technique I use.

Anyway, they tried telling me it's asthma (it's not -- I was on medication for weeks for it with no help); then costrocondritis, or inflammation of the sternum (it's not); and the list goes on and on.

The thing is... at night, when I used to sleep on my back, I'd have the same kind of pain during sleep paralysis. Not quite like being suffocated, but definite pain and irritation while breathing.

I've been to a pulmanologist -- my lungs are in great working condition. My heart is also great. There's no peripheral edema (swelling) or any other indicators of heart/lung problems. So it's likely to be something else.

So this long post is for me to ask this question: Does cataplexy ever affect just the chest muscles?

I've heard it only affecting the jaw, elbows, or facial muscles... but never the chest muscles. If that's the case, the pain is just because I feel like i can't breath, even though I can. But I can find anything about cataplexy affecting just the chest muscles...


drago

#2 Hank

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Posted 08 November 2012 - 10:00 AM

I have been having weird chest pain -- and I have ruled out literally dozens of possibilities. Right now my doctor things it's gastrointestinal / acid reflux thing.

It ONLY happens when I take a deep breath through the mouth... they tested me for anxiety-related issues because it happened "under stress," but of course it does, because I take more deep breaths when I am under stress -- either physically working out or stressed by work. It's a relaxation technique I use.

Anyway, they tried telling me it's asthma (it's not -- I was on medication for weeks for it with no help); then costrocondritis, or inflammation of the sternum (it's not); and the list goes on and on.

The thing is... at night, when I used to sleep on my back, I'd have the same kind of pain during sleep paralysis. Not quite like being suffocated, but definite pain and irritation while breathing.

I've been to a pulmanologist -- my lungs are in great working condition. My heart is also great. There's no peripheral edema (swelling) or any other indicators of heart/lung problems. So it's likely to be something else.

So this long post is for me to ask this question: Does cataplexy ever affect just the chest muscles?

I've heard it only affecting the jaw, elbows, or facial muscles... but never the chest muscles. If that's the case, the pain is just because I feel like i can't breath, even though I can. But I can find anything about cataplexy affecting just the chest muscles...


drago


Do you regularly breathe through your mouth or through your nose? The reason I ask is because I have always had trouble breathing through my nose, until recently. Mouth breathing creates shallow chest breathing, overworks the chest muscles and several other things. Mouth breathing dose not use the diaphragm which is important. Sleeping on your back also encourages mouth breathing. I found some useful information about this and it has helped me, but I don't want to go off on a tangent if this is not the case for you. I will look for your reply.

#3 DeathRabbit

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Posted 27 November 2012 - 11:10 AM

I have been having weird chest pain -- and I have ruled out literally dozens of possibilities. Right now my doctor things it's gastrointestinal / acid reflux thing.

It ONLY happens when I take a deep breath through the mouth... they tested me for anxiety-related issues because it happened "under stress," but of course it does, because I take more deep breaths when I am under stress -- either physically working out or stressed by work. It's a relaxation technique I use.

Anyway, they tried telling me it's asthma (it's not -- I was on medication for weeks for it with no help); then costrocondritis, or inflammation of the sternum (it's not); and the list goes on and on.

The thing is... at night, when I used to sleep on my back, I'd have the same kind of pain during sleep paralysis. Not quite like being suffocated, but definite pain and irritation while breathing.

I've been to a pulmanologist -- my lungs are in great working condition. My heart is also great. There's no peripheral edema (swelling) or any other indicators of heart/lung problems. So it's likely to be something else.

So this long post is for me to ask this question: Does cataplexy ever affect just the chest muscles?

I've heard it only affecting the jaw, elbows, or facial muscles... but never the chest muscles. If that's the case, the pain is just because I feel like i can't breath, even though I can. But I can find anything about cataplexy affecting just the chest muscles...


drago


Do you run a lot? It could be a persistent side stitch. If you try to do more cardio than your body can handle, you can actually give your ribs microfractures that make any sort of deep breath hurt like hell bunnies.

#4 exanimo

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Posted 03 March 2013 - 06:08 AM

I don't think that it could create chest pain. Only because what is happening during cataplexy, is the same thing that happens during REM. Your body paralyzes your muscles so that you do not act out your dreams. It does NOT paralyze the breathing muscles, like your diaphragm. Otherwise, you would die. That wouldn't be very effective.

 

During cataplexy, your are experiencing this remnant of REM, and your body is temporary paralyzing your muscles, which is the 'loss of muscle tone' that is characteristic of cataplexy. But as Hank suggested, it may very well be due to you overworking your chest muscles, by breathing through your mouth. Or it may be any other array of things. I get chest pain now and then, from breathing in sharply. But I have no idea what it is. It doesn't happen frequently enough to interrupt my daily life. But keep looking in to it, if it is affecting your daily life. Chest pain can be serious. I can't really give you any other information based on your post, but if you might go in to more detail about the pain, that would be helpful. What kind of pain is it? Sharp, burning, dull? How long does it last? Does it intensify if you hold your breath? Does the pain remain after you exhale? Does the volume of air you are inhaling make a difference? What about body positioning? Any of these would help to better identify what the cause may be. You don't have to post here with an answer to them, but I think that paying more attention and talking to your doctor about it may help. 

 

 

Good luck and best wishes!