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#1 Permanent Imagination

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Posted 12 October 2012 - 01:47 AM

I feel that since I have made it known to my employers about having N/C, my co-workers have started acting strangely towards me.
I was on a permanent 3rd shift; I don't think I have to tell you how detrimental that was with all considered.
So, my doctor had given me a note to give to my supervisors; [my doctor believed it would be beneficial to me in conjunction with my Nuvigil if I left that shift.]

Now, I am on a rotating 1st and 2nd shift.
Ever since that's happened it seems as if my co-workers are mad at me.

Then I found out why:
They had tried the whole "Doctor's note" ordeal and it didn't go over too well with them.
They also have it in their head that I "get away with murder."

I believe that they think I am trying to pull the wool over everyone's eyes, so to speak.
They do not understand what I'm going through.
They do not see anything physically wrong with me, and so they deem it as some sort of ruse; that I'm milking simply being tired.
If only it were that: Simply...tired.

It is really frustrating and they also make jokes.
Someone even posted a cartoon onto my computer at my desk at work, [it depicts a doctor telling his patient "You are suffering from a rare form of narcolepsy that occurs every night at 10pm until 7am.]
I felt that was a jab at my recent coming off of 3rd shift.

I had even overheard a couple of them threaten to file grievances as I have inconvenienced them by pushing them onto the 3rd shift in my place.

#2 DeathRabbit

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Posted 12 October 2012 - 09:28 AM

I feel that since I have made it known to my employers about having N/C, my co-workers have started acting strangely towards me.
I was on a permanent 3rd shift; I don't think I have to tell you how detrimental that was with all considered.
So, my doctor had given me a note to give to my supervisors; [my doctor believed it would be beneficial to me in conjunction with my Nuvigil if I left that shift.]

Now, I am on a rotating 1st and 2nd shift.
Ever since that's happened it seems as if my co-workers are mad at me.

Then I found out why:
They had tried the whole "Doctor's note" ordeal and it didn't go over too well with them.
They also have it in their head that I "get away with murder."

I believe that they think I am trying to pull the wool over everyone's eyes, so to speak.
They do not understand what I'm going through.
They do not see anything physically wrong with me, and so they deem it as some sort of ruse; that I'm milking simply being tired.
If only it were that: Simply...tired.

It is really frustrating and they also make jokes.
Someone even posted a cartoon onto my computer at my desk at work, [it depicts a doctor telling his patient "You are suffering from a rare form of narcolepsy that occurs every night at 10pm until 7am.]
I felt that was a jab at my recent coming off of 3rd shift.

I had even overheard a couple of them threaten to file grievances as I have inconvenienced them by pushing them onto the 3rd shift in my place.

Offer to shove a spike into their hypothalmus to let them know how it feels! Yea, I hear ya though. So many people think PWNs are full of crap. But I find it helps to be taken seriously by stressing that N is a form of brain damage, and it also helps to stress the more tangible symptoms (headaches, dysautonomic reactions, mental confusion, etc). You always have the option of filing a grievance or harassment complaint yourself. Narcolepsy is covered in the ADA to some degree, so that can help you strengthen you argument to HR if you file a complaint. Finally, you might try throwing them a bone every now and then. Perhaps if you are having a good week you can still pick up some work on the 3rd shift. When I feel terrible and need to call in I usually do, but every once in a while I make it a point to come in really sick. When people see you trying to fight through the pain, they usually gain respect. Even though I'm usually useless when I come into work like that, it ends up being a "thought that counts" type of situation.

#3 Permanent Imagination

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Posted 12 October 2012 - 11:30 AM

Offer to shove a spike into their hypothalmus to let them know how it feels! Yea, I hear ya though. So many people think PWNs are full of crap. But I find it helps to be taken seriously by stressing that N is a form of brain damage, and it also helps to stress the more tangible symptoms (headaches, dysautonomic reactions, mental confusion, etc). You always have the option of filing a grievance or harassment complaint yourself. Narcolepsy is covered in the ADA to some degree, so that can help you strengthen you argument to HR if you file a complaint. Finally, you might try throwing them a bone every now and then. Perhaps if you are having a good week you can still pick up some work on the 3rd shift. When I feel terrible and need to call in I usually do, but every once in a while I make it a point to come in really sick. When people see you trying to fight through the pain, they usually gain respect. Even though I'm usually useless when I come into work like that, it ends up being a "thought that counts" type of situation.


Well, the only available 3rd shift is overtime. Also, these women would probably be upset if I did, their logic probably being something in the ilk of "I thought she was too sick to do this shift." And that's not me being cynical, they've said similar things. Honestly, I've been keeping to myself a lot more as well as my business; being one to wear my heart on my sleeve did me in.

#4 Megssosleepy

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Posted 12 October 2012 - 02:12 PM

How terrible to have them treat you this way! What mean nasty people. Would they make fun of you if you had cancer, or some other ailment that could be see on the outside? I couldn't even imagine what I would do if something similar happened to me!

Being on the outside Id say give them information or file a complaint... but if it were me Id prolly be so upset Id have a full on C attack right in front of them! Although by the sounds of it they may just laugh and think you are faking! How nice would it be if we were faking, but why on earth would you want to? We don't get sympathy, usually no special treatment, teased, and laughed at.

Just realized what I would do, I would prolly say something along the lines "if I wanted to fake a disease I would pick one that people understood and had sympathy for! This sickness is not my fault its irreversible brain damage, you are being spiteful and making fun of me for having brain damage?"

ignorant azzholes!

#5 Permanent Imagination

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Posted 14 October 2012 - 10:53 PM

How terrible to have them treat you this way! What mean nasty people. Would they make fun of you if you had cancer, or some other ailment that could be see on the outside? I couldn't even imagine what I would do if something similar happened to me!

Being on the outside Id say give them information or file a complaint... but if it were me Id prolly be so upset Id have a full on C attack right in front of them! Although by the sounds of it they may just laugh and think you are faking! How nice would it be if we were faking, but why on earth would you want to? We don't get sympathy, usually no special treatment, teased, and laughed at.

Just realized what I would do, I would prolly say something along the lines "if I wanted to fake a disease I would pick one that people understood and had sympathy for! This sickness is not my fault its irreversible brain damage, you are being spiteful and making fun of me for having brain damage?"

ignorant azzholes!


I've had mini C attacks while trying to answer a 9-1-1 call. Can't hold the phone and try and wedge it between my head and neck to no avail. Phone always ends up slamming on my desk or on the floor. Yeah, it gets gnarly; incidentally just picked up an application for a job in another city. Hope that goes well!

#6 drago

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Posted 15 October 2012 - 08:44 AM

I feel that since I have made it known to my employers about having N/C, my co-workers have started acting strangely towards me.
I was on a permanent 3rd shift; I don't think I have to tell you how detrimental that was with all considered.
So, my doctor had given me a note to give to my supervisors; [my doctor believed it would be beneficial to me in conjunction with my Nuvigil if I left that shift.]

Now, I am on a rotating 1st and 2nd shift.
Ever since that's happened it seems as if my co-workers are mad at me.

Then I found out why:
They had tried the whole "Doctor's note" ordeal and it didn't go over too well with them.
They also have it in their head that I "get away with murder."


My first question is - who told them about the special circumstances? You have the right to privacy. If your supervisors told your co-workers, that's a HUGE no-no legally speaking. Even if they're asked, "Why can't so-and-so take that shift instead of me? Why does s/he get special treatment?" Your supervisor should NOT tell them anything about your disability.

If you're the one who told them -- I understand. If people assume you're getting special treatment, they can make it very difficult to live with. Especially if they're your friends, too.

And if someone says, "I tried that whole doctor's note thing, too and it didn't go over well." You can always ask them to disclose what the note was for. If they're not willing, ask them if it was anything like debilitating systemic neurological disorder -- which narcolepsy is.

I believe that they think I am trying to pull the wool over everyone's eyes, so to speak.
They do not understand what I'm going through.
They do not see anything physically wrong with me, and so they deem it as some sort of ruse; that I'm milking simply being tired.
If only it were that: Simply...tired.


My work-related trouble with co-workers and even my supervisor stemmed from the basic premise that narcolepsy is "only a sleeping disorder." Since it's just a disorder related to sleep, why would it affect me at work? If I was tired, why not just sleep more? Go to bed earlier? They acted like I my disorder was "just me being twenty-something" (an actual quotation from a former supervisor).

My supervisor actually started listing "things I could do" (besides him filling my accommodation request) like new alarm clocks, someone calling me in the morning to wake up, etc. I finally asked him, "If the remedy was so simple, what possible excuse could I have not to implement it?" He blinked stupidly for a solid minute after that and didn't respond to the question. Apparently it never occurred to him -- but that sadly didn't lead him to apologize for his rudeness.

It is really frustrating and they also make jokes.
Someone even posted a cartoon onto my computer at my desk at work, [it depicts a doctor telling his patient "You are suffering from a rare form of narcolepsy that occurs every night at 10pm until 7am.]
I felt that was a jab at my recent coming off of 3rd shift.


I am one of those people -- I know a lot of people aren't -- that would take that cartoon and modify it. Cross out the word "rare form of narcolepsy that occurs every night at 10pm until 7am" and replace it with "debilitating, systemic neurological disorder that is incurable and has poor treatment options and is widely misunderstood even by the medical community. You will be the butt of every ignorant joke by people who honestly believe they're not prejudice jerks and that they're the ones holding the short end of the stick."

I would add another line: "This is not - and never was - a joke."

Then I would blow it up and stick it over the old cartoon.

Like I said, I'm one of those people. I've been bullied all my life -- first because I was a small, young girl -- then because I was a short girl. Now because I'm still short and female and look a lot younger than I am and sometimes because of my disability (like you said -- you can't see it, I look fine, so how can I have a disability?) My tendency is to push back -- usually intellectually but sometimes a bit more passively, depending on the situation. I know not everyone does that -- but for me it's more than a habit - it's a survival skill. You know?

I had even overheard a couple of them threaten to file grievances as I have inconvenienced them by pushing them onto the 3rd shift in my place.


Let them file against you -- legally you are protected by the ADA.

If I was in your position -- I would ask for sensitivity training. They have special training to prevent sexual harassment, racism, etc. but they also have it for the accessibility/prejudice against people with disabilities. If your coworkers are being hostile and don't let it go, it might be time for some sensitivity training.

I hope your work-related issues clear up,
drago

#7 Megssosleepy

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Posted 17 October 2012 - 10:37 AM

My first question is - who told them about the special circumstances? You have the right to privacy. If your supervisors told your co-workers, that's a HUGE no-no legally speaking. Even if they're asked, "Why can't so-and-so take that shift instead of me? Why does s/he get special treatment?" Your supervisor should NOT tell them anything about your disability.

If you're the one who told them -- I understand. If people assume you're getting special treatment, they can make it very difficult to live with. Especially if they're your friends, too.

And if someone says, "I tried that whole doctor's note thing, too and it didn't go over well." You can always ask them to disclose what the note was for. If they're not willing, ask them if it was anything like debilitating systemic neurological disorder -- which narcolepsy is.



My work-related trouble with co-workers and even my supervisor stemmed from the basic premise that narcolepsy is "only a sleeping disorder." Since it's just a disorder related to sleep, why would it affect me at work? If I was tired, why not just sleep more? Go to bed earlier? They acted like I my disorder was "just me being twenty-something" (an actual quotation from a former supervisor).

My supervisor actually started listing "things I could do" (besides him filling my accommodation request) like new alarm clocks, someone calling me in the morning to wake up, etc. I finally asked him, "If the remedy was so simple, what possible excuse could I have not to implement it?" He blinked stupidly for a solid minute after that and didn't respond to the question. Apparently it never occurred to him -- but that sadly didn't lead him to apologize for his rudeness.



I am one of those people -- I know a lot of people aren't -- that would take that cartoon and modify it. Cross out the word "rare form of narcolepsy that occurs every night at 10pm until 7am" and replace it with "debilitating, systemic neurological disorder that is incurable and has poor treatment options and is widely misunderstood even by the medical community. You will be the butt of every ignorant joke by people who honestly believe they're not prejudice jerks and that they're the ones holding the short end of the stick."

I would add another line: "This is not - and never was - a joke."

Then I would blow it up and stick it over the old cartoon.

Like I said, I'm one of those people. I've been bullied all my life -- first because I was a small, young girl -- then because I was a short girl. Now because I'm still short and female and look a lot younger than I am and sometimes because of my disability (like you said -- you can't see it, I look fine, so how can I have a disability?) My tendency is to push back -- usually intellectually but sometimes a bit more passively, depending on the situation. I know not everyone does that -- but for me it's more than a habit - it's a survival skill. You know?



Let them file against you -- legally you are protected by the ADA.

If I was in your position -- I would ask for sensitivity training. They have special training to prevent sexual harassment, racism, etc. but they also have it for the accessibility/prejudice against people with disabilities. If your coworkers are being hostile and don't let it go, it might be time for some sensitivity training.

I hope your work-related issues clear up,
drago


DRAGO, you are amazing! This post made me smile big time :D I feel your pain with being small/short/young looking... If I get "you need to eat a burger" one more time!

When someone says "youre so short thats why I thought you were younger", I wonder if they think I am going to grow as I get older... Im pretty sure at 28 I am done lol

People can be so annoying!

#8 LauraL

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Posted 17 October 2012 - 05:30 PM

Did you report the cartoon to a supervisor or human resources office? It's your coworkers' prerogative to have their own opinions about whether your medical issues are legit--all very ignorant of them, of course--but anonymously depositing a cartoon on your desk that mocks a medical condition is out of line, and quite likely a violation of workplace policy. If I were in your shoes, I would bring this to the attention of a supervisor.

Medical conditions are absolutely covered under ADA, but the threshold for "harassment" under ADA is quite high. Teasing, rude remarks, etc. generally don't qualify, as I understand it, as contributing to a hostile work environment unless it's frequent or exceptionally severe. However, most workplaces have harassment-prevention or non-discrimination policies that lay out stricter guidelines for professional conduct--and if your workplace has one, I'd be very surprised if the cartoon didn't constitute a violation of policy.

(I work in government, and even though my job is not at all HR-related--I'm an environmental scientist--we all have to attend training on antidiscrimination law and policy regularly.)

Good luck with the situation. Doesn't sound like fun--but in my experience, working the system to make it work for you can be very empowering!

#9 DeathRabbit

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Posted 17 October 2012 - 05:37 PM

Did you report the cartoon to a supervisor or human resources office? It's your coworkers' prerogative to have their own opinions about whether your medical issues are legit--all very ignorant of them, of course--but anonymously depositing a cartoon on your desk that mocks a medical condition is out of line, and quite likely a violation of workplace policy. If I were in your shoes, I would bring this to the attention of a supervisor.

Medical conditions are absolutely covered under ADA, but the threshold for "harassment" under ADA is quite high. Teasing, rude remarks, etc. generally don't qualify, as I understand it, as contributing to a hostile work environment unless it's frequent or exceptionally severe. However, most workplaces have harassment-prevention or non-discrimination policies that lay out stricter guidelines for professional conduct--and if your workplace has one, I'd be very surprised if the cartoon didn't constitute a violation of policy.

(I work in government, and even though my job is not at all HR-related--I'm an environmental scientist--we all have to attend training on antidiscrimination law and policy regularly.)

Good luck with the situation. Doesn't sound like fun--but in my experience, working the system to make it work for you can be very empowering!


To quote Futurama "You still have the option of resorting to VIOLENCE!" But nah, don't do that. Some people like to feed on pain; it's their main method of sustenance. So don't show them any they can feast upon, and they will try to get their meals elsewhere.