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Chemically Induced Coma


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#1 DeathRabbit

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Posted 08 October 2012 - 06:11 PM

I was wondering, have they ever looked at putting N sufferers into short Comas (week long or less) to see what happens? I wonder if doing something like that might give the brain the chance to right itself somewhat, or at least catch up on some rest, since comatose states are closer to slow wave sleep, with delta waves being the predominate waves in the brain. I haven't been able to find any research on this subject. So that means it's either not been thought of or it's a really stupid idea, haha.

#2 platy

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Posted 08 October 2012 - 09:15 PM

I was wondering, have they ever looked at putting N sufferers into short Comas (week long or less) to see what happens? I wonder if doing something like that might give the brain the chance to right itself somewhat, or at least catch up on some rest, since comatose states are closer to slow wave sleep, with delta waves being the predominate waves in the brain. I haven't been able to find any research on this subject. So that means it's either not been thought of or it's a really stupid idea, haha.



I see where you're going with this idea. However, because it would not replace the orexin/hypocretin that most PWN are missing, it would not resolve the true problem.

If you haven't already, you might want to look up Sleeping Beauty Syndrome. A few times a year, they put us simple PWN folks to shame.

I love the thought of being allowed to sleep for a whole week and waking up feeling refreshed for once. Sadly, even that would not work, as one cannot store up on sleep as one can store up on caloric energy by overeating, for instance.

#3 DeathRabbit

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Posted 09 October 2012 - 12:20 AM

I see where you're going with this idea. However, because it would not replace the orexin/hypocretin that most PWN are missing, it would not resolve the true problem.

If you haven't already, you might want to look up Sleeping Beauty Syndrome. A few times a year, they put us simple PWN folks to shame.

I love the thought of being allowed to sleep for a whole week and waking up feeling refreshed for once. Sadly, even that would not work, as one cannot store up on sleep as one can store up on caloric energy by overeating, for instance.


Yeah, I doubt it would be a permanent fix. But it might allow for neuroplasticity to take hold. According to my research, about 30-40 years after onset of symptoms, most PWNs are almost cured. The brain can sometimes remap neurons to take the place of damaged ones, say the orexin transmitters. That's the leading theory on why N seems to "go away" after, a good chunk of a life time tho unfortunately. But I was wondering if a coma might help this neuroplastic regeneration along quicker. Just pure conjecture out of my ass; I'm sure some neurologist is reading this right now and facepalming.

#4 Megssosleepy

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Posted 09 October 2012 - 11:10 AM

Yeah, I doubt it would be a permanent fix. But it might allow for neuroplasticity to take hold. According to my research, about 30-40 years after onset of symptoms, most PWNs are almost cured. The brain can sometimes remap neurons to take the place of damaged ones, say the orexin transmitters. That's the leading theory on why N seems to "go away" after, a good chunk of a life time tho unfortunately. But I was wondering if a coma might help this neuroplastic regeneration along quicker. Just pure conjecture out of my ass; I'm sure some neurologist is reading this right now and facepalming.


This is an interesting thought... I have never read about the 30-40 year thing tho, A few older PWN I have spoken to say their symptoms have gotten worse, but being retired they prefer to be off meds? Where did you find that info I would love to read about it! Would be I only have 30 or so years left of this BS!!

The thought of being in a coma is a bit scary, but if a week in one would give me a week of relief I would SO do it right before Christmas week (also my bday week lol)

#5 DeathRabbit

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Posted 09 October 2012 - 03:13 PM

This is an interesting thought... I have never read about the 30-40 year thing tho, A few older PWN I have spoken to say their symptoms have gotten worse, but being retired they prefer to be off meds? Where did you find that info I would love to read about it! Would be I only have 30 or so years left of this BS!!

The thought of being in a coma is a bit scary, but if a week in one would give me a week of relief I would SO do it right before Christmas week (also my bday week lol)


This is not where I read it originally, but it mentions the lessening with age. Clicky
It's kinda discouraging that though that it's at its worst during our prime. I feel like the last two years of my life were stolen from me.

#6 tdmom

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Posted 09 October 2012 - 07:06 PM

Interesting idea but I think it would cause more problems then it would help.

To protect their airway, anyone who is put in an induced coma is intubated and put on a ventilator. That increases the risk of a ventilator acquired pneumonia. Then you will need a feeding tube to be fed, another tube, another route for infection. When in a medically induced coma you don't move - this lack of activity increases the chance of blood clots in your legs, which can lead to a pulmonary embolism, which can lead to death. It also increases the risk of bedsores, bedsores can cause infection. All of this means the around the clock care and costs of such care is phenonmenal. Then, a week later they wake you from all these meds needed to be in the coma and you will be very deconditioned from being in bed not moving for a week.

No, risk/benefit ratio is too high I think for the minimal return you would get from the week. By the time you were extubated and in shape to get around the effects would have worn off.

I was wondering, have they ever looked at putting N sufferers into short Comas (week long or less) to see what happens? I wonder if doing something like that might give the brain the chance to right itself somewhat, or at least catch up on some rest, since comatose states are closer to slow wave sleep, with delta waves being the predominate waves in the brain. I haven't been able to find any research on this subject. So that means it's either not been thought of or it's a really stupid idea, haha.



#7 drago

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Posted 27 October 2012 - 04:00 AM

I was wondering, have they ever looked at putting N sufferers into short Comas (week long or less) to see what happens? I wonder if doing something like that might give the brain the chance to right itself somewhat, or at least catch up on some rest, since comatose states are closer to slow wave sleep, with delta waves being the predominate waves in the brain. I haven't been able to find any research on this subject. So that means it's either not been thought of or it's a really stupid idea, haha.


A coma wouldn't really put the brain at rest. Scientists disagree over what makes a brain tick. For example, brain tissue needs more than just blood and calories -- it also needs electrical stimulation to survive. This raises the question, 'Does the bring need external stimuli (i.e. from the senses) to work?'

For PWN, the big brain problem is found in the hypothalamus, which is deeply embedded in the endocrine system. It controls temperature, hunger, sleep, etc. If you're looking for brain rejuvenation, you're going to want a more targeted system, like a sensory deprivation tank (aka 'isolation therapy') or some kind of hormonal 'reset' that might help the neuroplasticity of the hypothalamus.

There is nothing - no drug, no therapy, nada - that can actually make someone sleep. By sleep I mean appropriately go through the natural stages of sleep. You can sedate someone, knock them out, etc. but the chemical reactions and the 'restful' sleep you need? That can't be drug-induced, even in a coma state.

Some things that you can try that might have some outcome:
1 - Fasting. Orexin/Hypocretin production will surge after about 24 hours of fasting.
2 - Drug Holiday. Especially if you're on medications that affect your endocrine system -- a drug holiday can help your body purge influences & reset.
3 - Sleep holiday. No, seriously. Sometimes letting yourself sleep off your sleep debt - even if it's literally a day or two -- can really recharge your batteries.
4 - Climate control -- getting your temperature back to normal.
5 - Sensory deprivation and/or meditation. This might sound hokey (at least it sounded so to me!) but meditation and/or sensory deprivation can be drastically effective.

The trouble with comas is... unless you absolutely NEED one, you'll not be put in one... although I think it would be cool to have some hypothalamic neoplasticity 'treatments' out there... I'll be looking into that now... see if I can find anything.

drago