Jump to content


Photo

Service Dog For Cataplexy


  • Please log in to reply
12 replies to this topic

#1 willow

willow

    Member

  • Members
  • 14 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Washington State
  • Interests:I' m an Artist, mostly pencil / charcoal. Some oil and other mediums,
    My true love is my son, he's 9 yrs. old and autistic. He is adopted, in fact I helped to deliver him. He's Beautiful!
    .I was a surgical assistant until my N/C got too bad to work.

Posted 30 July 2012 - 01:59 PM

I have a small *BEEP*zu that my son brought to me when the puppy was just 3 1/2 weeks old. I had to bottle feed him, and to keep him warm (don't laugh) I carried him in my bra most of the time. We bonded big time, and when he was about six months old he started howling like a basset hound right before i had an attack. It only took me 4 falls to realize what he was doing:)
My Dr. checked it out and had him licensed as a service dog. He has saved me a lot of falls, because when he starts howling I sit down right where I am.
I was just wondering if anyone else has had the same experience?
Thanks, Willow

#2 Guest_tabster1_*

Guest_tabster1_*
  • Guests

Posted 02 August 2012 - 01:37 PM

I didn't know doctors could license service dogs. I thought you had to go through all this training and they had to pass a test and everything through some type of official organization.

#3 Lorz

Lorz

    Member

  • Members
  • 30 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Pennsylvania

Posted 06 August 2012 - 08:19 AM

That is a very interesting post, Willow. Did your dog have to go through any additional training? Are you now able to bring your dog everywhere with you because of this certification? I know it would be helpful for my dog to be there with me in the case of a full body cataplexy attack. If anyone has any info on this, or points me in the right direction, I would greatly appreciate it. :)

#4 willow

willow

    Member

  • Members
  • 14 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Washington State
  • Interests:I' m an Artist, mostly pencil / charcoal. Some oil and other mediums,
    My true love is my son, he's 9 yrs. old and autistic. He is adopted, in fact I helped to deliver him. He's Beautiful!
    .I was a surgical assistant until my N/C got too bad to work.

Posted 09 August 2012 - 06:09 PM

That is a very interesting post, Willow. Did your dog have to go through any additional training? Are you now able to bring your dog everywhere with you because of this certification? I know it would be helpful for my dog to be there with me in the case of a full body cataplexy attack. If anyone has any info on this, or points me in the right direction, I would greatly appreciate it. :)


Hi,
No, my dog didn't have to go through any training, because (I Guess) he was already doing it. I take my dog everywhere I go.
He has to wear his service dog tag on his halter, but it's actually against the law to ask what he does or what my disability is. My Dr. wrote a letter to the county dog licensing dept., and they sent me a tag for him that says "DOG LIC. Jefferson Co. WA. LIFETIME.
He doesn't have to wear a special vest or anything like that, the only thing that I do is take along a small blanket for shopping carts so he is comfortable and the store employees are o.k.
Recently I was told by the Postmaster at the Post Office to get out because dogs weren't allowed. When I told him it is a service dog he asked for proof and asked me what was wrong with me.
I quietly told him that both of the questions are illegal under FEDERAL LAW, and that he could be fined 10.000 for it. I suggested a class on federal law.
So I guess if I were you I would start with my Dr. and explain why you need your dog with you, and ask them to write a letter to your County Dog license office. It's really a very simple process.
Willow

#5 Guest_tabster1_*

Guest_tabster1_*
  • Guests

Posted 12 August 2012 - 01:54 PM

Hi,
No, my dog didn't have to go through any training, because (I Guess) he was already doing it. I take my dog everywhere I go.
He has to wear his service dog tag on his halter, but it's actually against the law to ask what he does or what my disability is. My Dr. wrote a letter to the county dog licensing dept., and they sent me a tag for him that says "DOG LIC. Jefferson Co. WA. LIFETIME.
He doesn't have to wear a special vest or anything like that, the only thing that I do is take along a small blanket for shopping carts so he is comfortable and the store employees are o.k.
Recently I was told by the Postmaster at the Post Office to get out because dogs weren't allowed. When I told him it is a service dog he asked for proof and asked me what was wrong with me.
I quietly told him that both of the questions are illegal under FEDERAL LAW, and that he could be fined 10.000 for it. I suggested a class on federal law.
So I guess if I were you I would start with my Dr. and explain why you need your dog with you, and ask them to write a letter to your County Dog license office. It's really a very simple process.
Willow


Yes but aren't they required to wear a vest? Otherwise anyone could claim their dog is a service dog, and if it is illegal to ask for proof (which I am not sure about that at all, I was under the impression they could ask for documentation on the dog, but can't ask about the nature of the disability) then literally anyone could do this.

....ok; I just looked at the ADA website....apparently they can ask if it is certified but you aren't required to show documentation and they still have to let you in. What a load of crap. Only some states have certifications......blah blah blah....well geez what is the point of having any type of certification program if it isn't required? Geez this is not regulated well AT ALL. Oh, and just to be clear, my annoyance is not directed at the OP but at the laws/government/certification people in general. I hate that everything about service dogs is so vague. It makes it hard for people who need help. Here's what I found:

Some, but not all, service animals wear special collars and harnesses. Some, but not all, are licensed or certified and have identification papers. If you are not certain that an animal is a service animal, you may ask the person who has the animal if it is a service animal required because of a disability. However, an individual who is going to a restaurant or theater is not likely to be carrying documentation of his or her medical condition or disability. Therefore, such documentation generally may not be required as a condition for providing service to an individual accompanied by a service animal. Although a number of states have programs to certify service animals, you may not insist on proof of state certification before permitting the service animal to accompany the person with a disability.

#6 willow

willow

    Member

  • Members
  • 14 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Washington State
  • Interests:I' m an Artist, mostly pencil / charcoal. Some oil and other mediums,
    My true love is my son, he's 9 yrs. old and autistic. He is adopted, in fact I helped to deliver him. He's Beautiful!
    .I was a surgical assistant until my N/C got too bad to work.

Posted 14 August 2012 - 03:27 PM

Yes but aren't they required to wear a vest? Otherwise anyone could claim their dog is a service dog, and if it is illegal to ask for proof (which I am not sure about that at all, I was under the impression they could ask for documentation on the dog, but can't ask about the nature of the disability) then literally anyone could do this.

....ok; I just looked at the ADA website....apparently they can ask if it is certified but you aren't required to show documentation and they still have to let you in. What a load of crap. Only some states have certifications......blah blah blah....well geez what is the point of having any type of certification program if it isn't required? Geez this is not regulated well AT ALL. Oh, and just to be clear, my annoyance is not directed at the OP but at the laws/government/certification people in general. I hate that everything about service dogs is so vague. It makes it hard for people who need help. Here's what I found:

Some, but not all, service animals wear special collars and harnesses. Some, but not all, are licensed or certified and have identification papers. If you are not certain that an animal is a service animal, you may ask the person who has the animal if it is a service animal required because of a disability. However, an individual who is going to a restaurant or theater is not likely to be carrying documentation of his or her medical condition or disability. Therefore, such documentation generally may not be required as a condition for providing service to an individual accompanied by a service animal. Although a number of states have programs to certify service animals, you may not insist on proof of state certification before permitting the service animal to accompany the person with a disability.

You are clearly right, and wrong. Persons with disabilities have to deal with people that question their disability on a regular basis. I don't know where you live but, in Washington state there are very clear penalties for a "fake" service animal. It's not perfect, and I'm sure people do fake certificates all the time. However, on the other hand...would you rather your privacy be invaded? My dog can only go where other people are permitted, he also has to be well behaved, which most fake service dogs probably are not, wandering at the end of their leash and not staying tuned to their owners. It seems like I am challenged regularly and if the laws were more strict I wouldn't be. But I guess that's the price for having a service dog. Sorry for spouting off like this, but my Dog has saved me from more falls than I can say. I don't know how or why, my Neuro can only guess that he is reading my electricity.
Thanks,
Willow

#7 Guest_tabster1_*

Guest_tabster1_*
  • Guests

Posted 19 August 2012 - 08:01 PM

You are clearly right, and wrong. Persons with disabilities have to deal with people that question their disability on a regular basis. I don't know where you live but, in Washington state there are very clear penalties for a "fake" service animal. It's not perfect, and I'm sure people do fake certificates all the time. However, on the other hand...would you rather your privacy be invaded? My dog can only go where other people are permitted, he also has to be well behaved, which most fake service dogs probably are not, wandering at the end of their leash and not staying tuned to their owners. It seems like I am challenged regularly and if the laws were more strict I wouldn't be. But I guess that's the price for having a service dog. Sorry for spouting off like this, but my Dog has saved me from more falls than I can say. I don't know how or why, my Neuro can only guess that he is reading my electricity.
Thanks,
Willow


I guess I'm just wondering how people with fake ones are penalized...if there aren't clear laws about certifications and whatnot? I assumed they would have some type of standardized process, but I guess that wouldn't work since everybody has a different disability.

I think you took what I was saying the wrong way. I'm not saying that you shouldn't have a dog, or that it should have been harder for you to get your dog. I actually think it's great that you were able to get one so easily. I'm just shocked because I always assumed it was something that you had to go through a lot of stuff for, and that they would make it as hard as possible. I suffered a severe traumatic brain injury as a child and just getting accommodations for school has been a major pain in the butt. I've had to go through 2 neuropsych evals to "prove" that I'm still disabled before they will give me something as simple as extra time for tests. So it's exciting that you could get something so helpful so quickly with the least amount of stress.

#8 SnoozleBear

SnoozleBear

    Member

  • Members
  • 11 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Australia

Posted 20 March 2013 - 01:00 AM

Wow.... I need sleep...that sentence was too much! haha..i read that as......If you are not certain that an animal is a service
animal, you may ask the animal if the person who has the animal has a disability....

 

 

I have looked into service dogs here, for another meidical condition ... though didnt go ahead with it... I thionk service dogs do so much good, for those who require them



#9 CreativeConfusion

CreativeConfusion

    Member

  • Members
  • 12 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Oklahoma
  • Interests:Sewing, dog training, all things artistic

Posted 02 September 2013 - 12:37 AM

 I am so pleased that someone besides me has a service dog for their narcolepsy! It is amazing what they can do! My Sage has been an absolute life saver. I got her for my PTSD before I had been diagnosed with N, but she has been amazing. It is hard when going into public places. Even though she acts like an angel and wears her vest everywhere we go, I still have people try to turn me away from time to time because they don't think she's real simply because they can't see anything wrong with me (I'm not in a wheelchair, bilnd, or deaf, so that means I have to be faking, right?) As soon as you spout the laws, they back off. I will say, however, that transparency is always the best policy when dealing with idiots. By law, the only thing they can ask you to prove are the types of services the dog provides to you, but it is easier to get people to back off if you are just honest and tell them what is wrong with you. Getting defensive makes people suspicious. I will say out of the other side of my mouth that it has become a favorite pastime of mine that when I hear people talking about me and saying that I'm deaf to call them out on it. I've made some people so embarrassed that they've left the restaurant we were in, and I wasn't even being rude! XD



#10 Hank

Hank

    Member

  • Members
  • 1,647 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 02 September 2013 - 07:31 AM

 I am so pleased that someone besides me has a service dog for their narcolepsy! It is amazing what they can do! My Sage has been an absolute life saver. I got her for my PTSD before I had been diagnosed with N, but she has been amazing. It is hard when going into public places. Even though she acts like an angel and wears her vest everywhere we go, I still have people try to turn me away from time to time because they don't think she's real simply because they can't see anything wrong with me (I'm not in a wheelchair, bilnd, or deaf, so that means I have to be faking, right?) As soon as you spout the laws, they back off. I will say, however, that transparency is always the best policy when dealing with idiots. By law, the only thing they can ask you to prove are the types of services the dog provides to you, but it is easier to get people to back off if you are just honest and tell them what is wrong with you. Getting defensive makes people suspicious. I will say out of the other side of my mouth that it has become a favorite pastime of mine that when I hear people talking about me and saying that I'm deaf to call them out on it. I've made some people so embarrassed that they've left the restaurant we were in, and I wasn't even being rude! XD

What kind of documentation did you need from your doctor? How did you register your dog as a service do? What is your dog trained to do- did you train it or did someone else?

 

I am very interested in hearing about this- thank you so much for posting.



#11 CreativeConfusion

CreativeConfusion

    Member

  • Members
  • 12 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Oklahoma
  • Interests:Sewing, dog training, all things artistic

Posted 07 September 2013 - 11:49 PM

What kind of documentation did you need from your doctor? How did you register your dog as a service do? What is your dog trained to do- did you train it or did someone else?

 

I am very interested in hearing about this- thank you so much for posting.

 

I will start by saying that I went through a trainer to get my dog, mostly because I was as lost as you were when I started looking. I really hope you live somewhere near Oklahoma, because if I can point you towards my trainer, that will solve all of your problems! If not... 

 

But to answer your questions, because I went through a trainer who worked very closely with us (she's a one man show, not a major corporation, so she is able to work one on one with her service dogs) the only time I needed documentation from my doctor was when the people from the school required it. However, I did get it copied down to wallet sized and laminated. When I was still in school and living on campus, I carried it in my wallet in case anyone gave me a problem. Between that letter and a letter from my trainer explaining that she was a working dog, not a pet, and the types of things that she was trained to do, I have not needed any other kind of documentation. We both have i.d.'s that we wear as well saying that we are together as a service dog and a service dog handler. She has not taken her public access test yet, but she will soon. These forms of documentation are not required by law, but the more documentation you have as a form of CYA, the better in case something bad happens. It is always best to prepare for the worst. If you dog has not been trained properly, and say you're at a doctor's appointment, the doctor barges into the room, your dog gets spooked and growls at him, and the doctor freaks out and says that your dog tried to attack him, what then? (Yes, that did happen to someone I know.) Or what if your dog totally loses his mind and does attack your doctor? (No, that has not happened to anyone I know, thank God.) If you don't have enough paperwork, there's no telling what could happen- dog gets put down for being aggressive, you get sued out of house and home, you're never allowed to have a service dog again. Paperwork is good. You can also register your dog with different international service dog organizations, but I don't know how that it done. My trainer did that for Sage before she came home to me.

 

Sage is trained to help me wake up in the morning (her favorite thing in the whole world, seeing as she gets to act like an idiot and do everything she is normally not supposed to do), calm me after/ during a panic attack, she pulls me out of PTSD nightmares, she figured out that when I get cranky and tired during the day that I need to take a nap and she danced around trying to get me to follow her until she got to my bed and just stared at me with what we call her "over the glasses look" (I was so shocked I just started laughing! I did not train her to do that!), she sleeps with me at night so that I feel safe, and she is extremely well mannered and well behaved. Anywhere I go, she is perfectly happy to just tuck under my chair and stay there. I did not train her originally, but because she is so stinking smart, I have has to continue training her to do new things or else risk her getting bored and getting into trouble.

 

I will say that if you take your dog in public, you HAVE TO HAVE A VEST ON HIM/HER. You can order them online for about $20 (give or take), but it will save you a lot of heartache.



#12 Ferret

Ferret

    Member

  • Members
  • 946 posts
  • Gender:Female

Posted 08 September 2013 - 12:49 PM

I thoroughly enjoyed reading your post CreativeConfusion. May you and Sage have a long and loving relationship.

I, on the other hand, have a Belgian Shepherd (well, mommy was purebred but papa was a rolling stone)...she's the spitting image of her mother and way too smart for her own good. The flip side of your dog is that Zorra has CAUSED me to have cataplectic seizures with her  antics although she is always sincerely sorry after the fact. When she puts her head in my lap, hooks my leg with her front paw and "looks over her glasses" at me, she just melts my heart. It constantly amazes me how much she understands what I say but then I've been talking to her since she was 7 1/2 weeks old and she's now 8 1/2 years old. Her ears will get extra perky for the words Chicken, Cheese and Car

We are, indeed, lucky to have them.



#13 louie

louie

    Member

  • Members
  • 39 posts

Posted 07 November 2013 - 09:27 PM

I had a service dog for years. A service dog has to be trained to do something for you thqt you can't do because of a disability. They must also be public access trained. If you bring an untrained dog into public and he creates a nuisance by like barking or pooping or growling you can be asked to leave. I would like another sd, but the years of training and stress of trying to find an affordable candidate is too much right now.