Jump to content


Photo

How To Tell A Psychology Teacher He's Doing It Wrong...


  • Please log in to reply
2 replies to this topic

#1 EmersonAilidh

EmersonAilidh

    Member

  • Members
  • 19 posts

Posted 16 December 2010 - 07:16 PM

Hi! I'm currently battling with a Narcolepsy diagnosis. It's a confusing story... I've posted about it on the diagnosis forum.

I just wanted to ask about how to approach a teacher who's telling people false information about Narcolepsy. In my 10th-12th grade Psychology class, there's a unit on sleep disorders, Narcolepsy being one of them. This teacher kept stressing the people with Narcolepsy were NOT sleepy or fatigued, that we (I feel comfortable saying WE) just passed out. He was basically talking about Cataplexy, but he said that they fell asleep when they fell down, which as far as I've heard isn't the case. He also said that we entered Stage IV, not REM, sleep too quickly.

What is a polite, respectful way to go about this? Are there any articles or anything I could give him? Thank you all!

#2 drago

drago

    Member

  • Members
  • 203 posts

Posted 16 December 2010 - 08:09 PM

Hi! I'm currently battling with a Narcolepsy diagnosis. It's a confusing story... I've posted about it on the diagnosis forum.

I just wanted to ask about how to approach a teacher who's telling people false information about Narcolepsy. In my 10th-12th grade Psychology class, there's a unit on sleep disorders, Narcolepsy being one of them. This teacher kept stressing the people with Narcolepsy were NOT sleepy or fatigued, that we (I feel comfortable saying WE) just passed out. He was basically talking about Cataplexy, but he said that they fell asleep when they fell down, which as far as I've heard isn't the case. He also said that we entered Stage IV, not REM, sleep too quickly.

What is a polite, respectful way to go about this? Are there any articles or anything I could give him? Thank you all!


Polite, respectful: Talk to him outside of class, preferably alone. There is a good chance he learned this misinformaiton about narcolepsy as fact some time ago while learning about sleeping disorders. I would recommend using Google scholar or something similar for new research, but you can also go to Stanford University's Center for Narcolepsy for some information:

http://med.stanford....try/narcolepsy/

Try to avoid personalizing the issue (i.e. "You are teaching misinformation about ME!") unless he sees skeptical at your intentions, in the which case you can tell him that you've dealt with a sleeping disorder and you're sure other students must deal with them, too - and it helps to have accurate information, especially in the case of a misunderstood (and wildly underdiagnosed) disorder.

drago

#3 ohiolor

ohiolor

    Member

  • Members
  • 114 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:NE Ohio

Posted 16 December 2010 - 11:26 PM

Narcolepsy Network has a number of brochures that you can print off of the website here:


http://www.narcoleps...rces/brochures/

and/or you can call the Network office and talk to Joyce to see which other brochures might do the job. Hopefully once he has the correct information, he'll reteach that part of the class.

Lorrie