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Correlation Between Giftedness And Narcolepsy


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#41 sk8aplexy

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Posted 14 August 2013 - 11:30 AM

Not sure about, in regards to meds one way or the other (as I don't take any due to sensitivities, or the negatives outweighing the benefit).

But, I can say that there's definitely something major going on for me, in regards to whether or not I'm stimulated through interest and/or enjoyment from, or in, what I'm doing.

If a topic is dull and/or not of real interest, or engaging to me, it is likely that I won't be able to focus deeply upon it for long. 

Definitely when it comes to reading and/or doing any repetitive process, it puts me into a secondary day dreaming state and/or nodding off state -microsleeps-; even when it comes to chit chatting with people socially (am not big on socializing 'in groups' because it can be so monotonous), I find it difficult to concentrate enough to even participate.

The same sort of 'staying stimulated through interest/enjoyment' goes for activities, physically, if I'm not enjoying it then it seems to drag out over a short period of time and I'll become weak as well as tired; versus if I'm enjoying the activity, it will fly by and I'll manage it much more comfortably for longer than I expect (to be able to have managed it), often.

 

Seems to be a double edged blade, at times.



#42 ironhands

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Posted 19 August 2013 - 12:38 PM

I was taking special classes since 1st grade, they clocked me with a high IQ, but around 5th grade things got a little odd.  They put me in special classes afterschool to deal with my disorganised penmanship.  Several teachers were disputing my identification because I wasn't getting perfect on every test and couldn't write an essay to save my life and never did my homework, consistently calling me "lazy".  They were trying to label me with a learning disability as well.  My 6th grade teacher had me removed from the special classes, told everyone I was lazy and would likely drop out in highschool if I didn't get my act together and put in any effort.  She had me put in special needs classes, putting me with the "mentally challenged" kids.  Completely ruined any chance I had at achieving any academic success.  If one person had simply thought - "hmm, he looks tired all the time" instead of "he's lazy and will amount to nothing more than his stoner father", things would have gone a lot differently.  Granted, this was a few years before they would have pumped me full of ritalin.  Might have done the trick.

 

Was useless in phys-ed.  Weak, and uncoordinated.  Small town where you were nobody if you didn't play organised sports.  Really ruins any self-esteem you might have, especially when you're also from a low-income family. 

 

That's why until 3 weeks ago, I've only thought it was depression for the past 20 years.

 

As far as the correlation, it's likely one exists, but it's difficult to say which spawned the other.  Are the brains simply working at a higher activity due to the longer REM periods, or, are the longer REM periods because the brain has trouble slowing down/stopping, causing the thirst for use.



#43 kyethra

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Posted 26 August 2013 - 12:43 AM

No, I believe there is no correlation between n and intelligence. If anything, the reverse is more likely to be true in regards to neurological disorders. It is true that at either end of the bell curve, there are more behavioral abnormalities.

#44 Hank

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Posted 26 August 2013 - 10:35 AM

I think there is likely a correlation between giftedness and those diagnosed with N. Afterall, only 25% of us are diagnosed- and it takes 10 + years to get diagnosed. It al most sounds like survival of the fittest to even arrive at a diagnosis. I wonder what that says about those of us who have managed to function this far.

It also seems terribly sad for all of those still struggling without knowing and may never know that they live with this illness. Certainly not to say they are anything less- we were all there to varying degrees.

Perhaps the giftedness lies in the resilience and perseverance of each of us who has survived the gauntlet just to arrive where we have.

The ways in which we have managed astounds me. How many poor souls who fell asleep at the wheel and lost their lives were undiagnosed. How many people who gave up on themselves and stopped trying were undiagnosed. How many people who live out their lives naively believing the wrong diagnosis are actually living with N.

I think just arriving at a diagnosis presupposes a certain level of giftedness in a number of forms- intellect, perseverance, resilience. And just living with this - known or unknown- deserves credit.
We amaze me.

#45 Aivilomi

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Posted 24 February 2014 - 02:01 AM

I think there might be a slight correlation with N and giftedness, seeing how well PWNs adapt to compensate for N. 

However, what I've realized is that my 'giftedness' is balanced out by N. Making me a person of normal intelligence.

 

Here's why, I was recently diagnosed with N and while I am getting treated for N, I am noticing some other issues that were prominent again before I started having these sleepy episodes so as advised by school therapists etc, I went for a series of neuropsych testing. My composite IQ score on all three of the IQ tests administered (full-length) were above 96 percentile (96th being the lowest of the three). But my grades, my life do not reflect this at all. I am lacking a lot the other skills that people were able to develop normally while I was snoozing away. Like verbal intelligence, etc. Now, I am not sure if that is a reflection of my N or my other possible issues but in my case, narcolepsy made me less "gifted" and more of normal intelligence even though I was "born" with high IQ.

 

I don't come across as "gifted" either, given that I often manage to "sleep" talk while talking to people and whatever I say makes no sense most of the time (I am sometimes told of this).

 

I guess it's how you define "giftedness". On paper, I'm gifted; in reality, I think I'm far from it.

 

If that makes any sense. I'm getting sleepy again. X



#46 exanimo

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Posted 15 March 2014 - 05:11 AM

I think there is likely a correlation between giftedness and those diagnosed with N. Afterall, only 25% of us are diagnosed- and it takes 10 + years to get diagnosed. It al most sounds like survival of the fittest to even arrive at a diagnosis. I wonder what that says about those of us who have managed to function this far.

It also seems terribly sad for all of those still struggling without knowing and may never know that they live with this illness. Certainly not to say they are anything less- we were all there to varying degrees.

..

I think just arriving at a diagnosis presupposes a certain level of giftedness in a number of forms- intellect, perseverance, resilience. And just living with this - known or unknown- deserves credit.
We amaze me.

This is incredibly true. So many PWNs (diagnosed as well as undiagnosed) will probably mention their symptoms to many people throughout their lifetime - doctors, friends, family, acquaintances, etc. Very few (that 25%) will take it a step further and search, and FIGHT, to get the truth of the whole thing. And that's on average - 10 years of searching, and fighting, to get there. We are all obviously intelligent enough to recognize at some point - that what we are experiencing is NOT normal - and resilient enough to keep fighting for the truth behind it. It's a lot of work weeding through information and symptoms, and self reflection, and talking to various medical professionals, to get there.

 

I think there might be a slight correlation with N and giftedness, seeing how well PWNs adapt to compensate for N. 

However, what I've realized is that my 'giftedness' is balanced out by N. Making me a person of normal intelligence.

This is quite true! Our sleepiness is a real downer in this sense - because while it would be great to reach our full potential - that is quite hard when we are fighting off sleep all of the time. I like to say that we are just too awesome - and the world couldn't handle us without N. I mean I know that I don't always get things done - but I can be a bit of an energizer bunny at times. I can't imagine if I did that 24/7. Obviously society just wouldn't be able to handle my awesome productive self! And so I have N - where I can be half -productive, most of the time. lol. 



#47 Lorax64

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Posted 16 April 2014 - 02:03 AM

I have no idea... my son was considered to be gifted back when he was quite young and didn't have any signs of N. However, it is amusing that during his 9th and 10th grade years teachers thought he was quite blah, out-of-it, not very smart, not a great attitude, etc. (his concussion was at the end of his 8th grade year, the beginning of his narcolepsy issues). Only one teacher in that time saw that he wasn't falling asleep constantly because of attitude, and didn't seem at all surprised by the narcolepsy diagnosis. This year, getting Adderall every morning and staying awake during school - usually  ;) - his GPA has jumped way up, the teachers are amazed at his supposed change in attitude, but the only difference is being better able to control the sleeping. GPA was about 2.3, now he gets 3.9's each quarter.



#48 Lousyskater

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Posted 18 April 2014 - 12:26 AM

I don't know that I'd consider myself gifted, just adaptable and/or focused. I went through the Navy's Nuclear Power School back in 2007(equated to a 2 year Nuclear Engineering degree, but crammed into 6 months and having been developed by MIT) and was the bottom of both my section(30 enlisted students) and class as a whole(300 of us total) and had a hell of a time keeping up with the material. I managed to make it through the school though because even though I couldn't keep up with all the subjects at once, I could handle one or two of them at a time so I looked at our test schedule for the entire 6 months and planned out every single one of my test failures, tests that I wouldn't bother to study for period. I was able to spread out my test failures enough that I was still able to maintain passing grades overall and on a individual subject basis and ultimately made it through the school. My instructors said I had the record for highest amount of total test failures while still maintaining passing grades in all subjects.

 

But yeah, 40 hour school weeks with an additional 30-35 hours of extra study which could only be done in the school house due to the material being classified sucked. No desire to go through that ever again. That wasn't even the worst of it either, the training phase after that was all hands on technical training at an operating plant and I was putting in 100 hour work weeks on average for 4 months(6 month long training, first two months was familiarization training, so we were only putting in 12 hour days 5 days a week. Cakewalk compared to everything else I'd done in the program at that point).



#49 purpley

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Posted 19 April 2014 - 03:56 PM

Lousyskater, that story is incredible. The way you got through Nuclear Power School is absolutely brilliant, and really creative; I would have never even thought of that! It's a great example of how important it is to first recognize and respect our limitations (and every person has those, N or no N) instead of trying to do things as if we didn't have them and hoping that will get us where we want to go. But then it's equally important to recognize we're not limited in where we want to go -- we just need to figure out a different way to get there.

Thanks for the inspiration!

#50 purpley

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Posted 19 April 2014 - 04:28 PM

And to address the overall topic, I agree with Hank that PWN are probably not any more intelligent per se than non-PWNs, but that the ones who get diagnosed probably are, on average. I did neuropsych testing as well as in my late 20s. I'd been diagnosed with ADHD and was taking Ritalin, which changed my life with regard to being able to stay awake. I knew I was smart, but I knew I was still very absent-minded even on the Ritalin and wanted to find out where the problem was.

Sure enough, the testing showed that my IQ was very high in all domains, but my working memory was only 50th percentile. Working memory is where you hold information just long enough to either use it -- like keeping in your brain that you just put water on to boil, or remembering a phone number after you look it up, just long enough to go get your phone and dial it -- or store it in long-term memory. So yeah, I'm smart, I have no trouble figuring out things or remembering them once I have them in my head, but I'm also your typical absent-minded professor, who has to put water up to boil at least 3 times in an electric kettle before remembering to actually make the tea with it.

The interesting thing is that all this time, I thought that proved the ADHD diagnosis, because problems with attention and working memory are pathognomonic of that condition. So I figured I really did have ADHD, regardless of whether or not I also had N. But when I finally saw the sleep doc, he pointed out it's also the very cognitive domain affected by sleep deprivation. D'oh!