Westsiders

Correlation Between Giftedness And Narcolepsy

55 posts in this topic

It's possible. I'm in the top 5% of my class, but I never qualified for the gifted programs because I had a lisp when I was younger (being in speech classes meant that I was "below gradelevel requirements" and therefore not eligible for gifted programs). However, I am as smart if not smarter than (GPA, test score wise) than the people I know in the gifted programs.

 

I would also argue that narcoleptics must be smarter in some aspects, at least in adaptability and coping, just from dealing with the sleepiness all the time around jobs and schoolwork and social lives.

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Hi all.  I honestly can't remember if I've ever posted here, but I've long suspected I had N and I finally got around to getting a nap study done last month.  Five hours ago I got the news that I am, indeed, narcoleptic w/o cat.  My issues started when I hit 13 years old.  Only in the past five years or so has it gotten completely out of control and horrible.  Leading up to my third year of undergrad, my grades had steadily declined from a 4.0 to the low 2.0's.  At that point, I was already convinced by multiple doctors and family that I was just depressed and lazy.  

 

I finally got around to seeing a neuropsychologist who gave me the two-day intelligence test others here have described.  He said he didn't like giving an overall score, but essentially he said I was in the low 130's (130-132, I'm not 100% certain).  He stated that there were certain areas that put me in the upper 99% but tests that involved recall, mainly semantic, put me in the "severely impaired" category.  I didn't ask for a scoring, but from the IQ scales I've seen, I guess that's below 70.  No bueno.  I was started on Ritalin and then Focalin. My grades went from the low 2's back to mid to upper 3's immediately with the medication.  My university also took some measures to shield me from exams that involved a focus on word recall - which is a significant focus for a bio major.  I'm now 34 and I've been on daily, bid Focalin 5-10 mg since the IQ test was administered.  

 

I've been googling a little bit, which is how I ended up in this thread and back on this site, and there are actual studies that do comparators of intelligence of N versus non-N, and high IQ N patients versus lower to average IQ N patients.  Cognitive/functional memory is the consistent deficiency amongst N versus normal groups.  We could've told the researchers that.  Interestingly, high IQ N patients had a lower incidence of depression while lower IQ N patients had a higher incidence of major depression.  Maybe the low versus high IQ groups approach the emotional impact of our symptoms differently, with higher IQ groups being more creative in avoiding N-related educational and career roadblocks.

 

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3633189/

 

I don't believe N actually affects one's intelligence.  I do believe that it affects our ability to take the tests, though.

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I think my being "gifted" is more a result of my autism than my narcolepsy. I have been "gifted" my whole life, and I have been autistic my whole life, but I have only been narcoleptic for  ~10 years (and only recently diagnosed). 

I will say my autism partially masked my narcolepsy. I attributed virtually all of my symptom to autism, until I was prescribed adderall, and realized that it is possible to be awake. I was diagnosed with ADHD with the adderall, but I think that was a misdiagnosis from the combo of narcolepsy and autism. 

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Interesting although I would've thought depression would be more common among the PWN who had higher IQs. Greater awareness of their limitations, comparing themselves to when they were higher functioning, decrease in earning potential/ability to work, perhaps a greater understanding of stigma associated with the diagnosis...

It would be fascinating to see IQ scores of PWN/IH pre-diagnosis vs post-diagnosis. I scored somewhere above average as a child (don't know the actual score) but now I stop at green lights and have word-finding issues.

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On 9/9/2015 at 8:25 PM, everythingthatshimmers said:

Interesting although I would've thought depression would be more common among the PWN who had higher IQs. Greater awareness of their limitations, comparing themselves to when they were higher functioning, decrease in earning potential/ability to work, perhaps a greater understanding of stigma associated with the diagnosis...

It would be fascinating to see IQ scores of PWN/IH pre-diagnosis vs post-diagnosis. I scored somewhere above average as a child (don't know the actual score) but now I stop at green lights and have word-finding issues.

1. It took me a good 30 seconds to figure out why you listed stopping at green lights as a problem.

2. I was always an over-achiever, worked very hard to pursue my interests and did well in school. I set big goals for myself and worked hard...part of the reason if took me so long to realize my sleepiness was abnormal. The past several years I've been at several different jobs with moderate success and with almost no activity outside of work - no hobbies, no socializing, no pursuit of my non-job related goals. I've always had depression, but this inactivity led to a lot of self hatred and feelings of worthlessness and hopelessness that I'd never achieve anything that mattered to me. I'm really hopeful that treating my narcolepsy will have a positive impact on my depression as well.

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