Westsiders

Correlation Between Giftedness And Narcolepsy

55 posts in this topic

This thread amounts to some good conversation. Thought I might update everyone on my little struggle, what it's objective was and what conclusions it has brought me to.

My circumstances w/my treatment are likely unique. It began well prior to my dx/MSLT+ and legal amphetamine Rx. I found meth 30 yrs ago, w/this for me came a way to correct the abnormality my narcolepsy symptoms amount to. An abnormality of which I was unaware even as I had awareness that for some reason I truly needed my meth. and others using same did so on an elective basis.

I find the inclusion of this needed to tell my tale....a tale of tolerance to stimulants so very, very high that i will never be fully treated by an MD's Rx, ever. Obvioulsly, my high tolerance is because of the decades spent self-medicating daily w/illegal meth. Today, the 60mg/d of mixed amphetamine salts that is the manufacturer's recommended maximum dose will have -0- effect upon me. I can actually consume this amt. and it does NOTHING. This would hold true after a washout of weeks duration, even months. I swear by all i love this is only the simple truth.

I currently am rx'ed 300 mg/d mixed amphetamine salts. This is a miracle i am truly grateful to my rx'er. Unfortunately about 500mg/d is indicated. I am forced to consume my Rx @ this rate and return to illegal meth when the monthly supply runs out prematurely.

I have done all I can to get the amt. i need rx'ed and have found it quite impossible.

Some of you may suspect i would benefit from an extensive washout and that perhaps i should reconsider my beleif that i truly benefit from massive doses of stimulants.

I submit that I do, and that I am of sound mind. There may be people adversely affected by stimulants deluding them into the beleif that they are the anti-christ.

W/rueful laughter I realized recently who I must be.

The Anti-Tigger.

Anyone remember Tigger? The most wonderful thing about Milne's tigger was that he was the only one!

As i write i struggle w/the brutal cash drain the so-called 'poor man's cocaine' (meth) and my finances ever remain on the precipice of ruin and perdition to follow.

There will never be legal, medically supervised treatment of my symptoms on a consistent, day to day basis. Remember how bouncy Tigger was?

Well the Anti-Tigger is somnolescent w/untreated n. symptoms to an equal degree.

And the most terrible thing about Anti-Tiggers...........is being the only one. Yes, 500mg/d mixed amphetamine salts is indicated. Never to be Rx'ed

Sally forth, all. Remember me in your prayers. Keep the focus on things positive; regrets that not so much in the way of this is possible for me to express here, save the following axiom: any day spent on this side of the grass is a good one!

Hope i can spend all mine asymtomatic w/my eds fully treated, one way or the other. Just wish it could be just the one. Intrepid hero MD, where could you be??

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I have always considered myself a bit smarter than the average. I'm not trying to sound cocky but it's true. I've always had the ability and potential to be a high achiever however my N holds me back. Even with my abilities its hard to complete homework assignments on lessons I completely slept through. Most of the time it's easy enough to skim the textbook chapters and piece together the information, but there are some things that are nice to have a teacher for. I progress the best in reading comprehension and writing and still do good in mathematics and science. My hope is to get a Masters degree in Electrical Engineering & Computer Science but I still have another year of high school ahead of me before I can begin.

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I have always considered myself a bit smarter than the average. I'm not trying to sound cocky but it's true. I've always had the ability and potential to be a high achiever however my N holds me back. Even with my abilities its hard to complete homework assignments on lessons I completely slept through. Most of the time it's easy enough to skim the textbook chapters and piece together the information, but there are some things that are nice to have a teacher for. I progress the best in reading comprehension and writing and still do good in mathematics and science. My hope is to get a Masters degree in Electrical Engineering & Computer Science but I still have another year of high school ahead of me before I can begin.

Good luck. I'm a CPE myself, though not Master level. I will say to be sure to get plenty of IRL experience through work study/co-op if you can, because the market is over-saturated with new grads in our field, due to the poor economy and the tech resurgence that happened right before it tanked. Many people jumped into CPE being virtually guaranteed a job with a 90k starting salary, only to graduate and end up busing tables or taking low paying IT/tech positions. If you can, I encourage you to find a good pigeonhole, because it seems like most of the ones that are excelling are doing so because they picked one ultra-specific specialization and got really really good at it. I personally recommend parallel programming, because it's woefully underexplored in most curriculae, and seeing as it importance is still relatively new, many experienced developers can't multithread even embarrassingly parallel algorithms, due to inexperience with that mode of thinking.

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I'm a scientist, though it's antibiotics I study and not neurobiology (which would have been pretty cool considering I could be my own test subject). B)

I've always been pretty smart, but I've always worked hard at it too. I tried to make 100% on everything I did, all the time. Studying was a b*tch because I'd read the same page over and over and over again, never able to focus on the whole thing long enough to learn it. Falling asleep trying to study all the time, etc.

I couldn't wait to finish my undergrad and get out of school. It took so much effort. Now, 20 years later, I know why. I was always fighting to stay awake and force myself to concentrate. It's a shame really. You can't go that far in a scientific career without having a PhD. I am 100% positive I'm smart enough to do it. I just couldn't stay awake long enough. :blink:

Fortunately, I love what I do and it's easy to be interested in it. I CAN stay awake when I'm interested, though I do dump a lot of my daily energy into forcing that wakefulness. The few people I've told about the narcolepsy are shocked - they apparently never noticed my daily struggle. I guess that's good and bad. Good that I've managed to be productive and have a successful career despite narcolepsy. Bad because I wonder if they really believe me; and if they do, they probably think the disease is no big deal because of how much I've been able to accomplish in my life. But...I'm tired. Really tired. I've pushed myself to succeed through the dark cloud of this disease for over 20 years, and I've hit the wall. I've had enough.

There was a post a few back about focusing on stuff. Apologies to the writer, as I forget who you are. I wanted to comment that I'm an uber-focuser. When I get in the "zone" I keep going and going and going. Energizer bunny style. I don't eat, I don't sleep, I don't go to the bathroom...I am PART of what I'm doing and it consumes me until I finish. Woe to anyone who interrupts me during one of those zonings!!! LOL

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I'm a scientist, though it's antibiotics I study and not neurobiology (which would have been pretty cool considering I could be my own test subject). B)

I've always been pretty smart, but I've always worked hard at it too. I tried to make 100% on everything I did, all the time. Studying was a b*tch because I'd read the same page over and over and over again, never able to focus on the whole thing long enough to learn it. Falling asleep trying to study all the time, etc.

I couldn't wait to finish my undergrad and get out of school. It took so much effort. Now, 20 years later, I know why. I was always fighting to stay awake and force myself to concentrate. It's a shame really. You can't go that far in a scientific career without having a PhD. I am 100% positive I'm smart enough to do it. I just couldn't stay awake long enough. :blink:

Fortunately, I love what I do and it's easy to be interested in it. I CAN stay awake when I'm interested, though I do dump a lot of my daily energy into forcing that wakefulness. The few people I've told about the narcolepsy are shocked - they apparently never noticed my daily struggle. I guess that's good and bad. Good that I've managed to be productive and have a successful career despite narcolepsy. Bad because I wonder if they really believe me; and if they do, they probably think the disease is no big deal because of how much I've been able to accomplish in my life. But...I'm tired. Really tired. I've pushed myself to succeed through the dark cloud of this disease for over 20 years, and I've hit the wall. I've had enough.

There was a post a few back about focusing on stuff. Apologies to the writer, as I forget who you are. I wanted to comment that I'm an uber-focuser. When I get in the "zone" I keep going and going and going. Energizer bunny style. I don't eat, I don't sleep, I don't go to the bathroom...I am PART of what I'm doing and it consumes me until I finish. Woe to anyone who interrupts me during one of those zonings!!! LOL

I was concerned last year that I might have ADHD and went through testing. It turned out I am really smart and do not have ADHD. 11 months later, the Narcolepsy diagnosis finally explained my difficulty concentrating for extended periods of time- I would just start falling asleep. I also wish my mystery had been solved sooner. I have pushed myself relentlessly hard over time to accomplish what I have. I can be incredibly focused and determined. I had become so accustomed to pushing myself beyond my limits that I seemed like the energizer bunny to others. And people believe what they see. I never felt like what they saw. I felt like that movie "Speed"- if I slowed down I was done for. I have lived in the zone for so long, I actually screwed up my body temporarily. My "Pregnenolone" level and Vitamin D were both super low. Somehow my FP knew to check this- the relentless stress of pushing myself so hard wiped me out. Since I have been addressing this deficit I feel sooo much better.

So, right now I am learning how to relax. Xyrem has reduced my EDS so much that I no longer need a stimulant. I can relax without falling asleep- what a novelty.

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Heard a country song on the radio while flipping channels the other day, and the chorus really caught my attention:

"The Only Way I Know", Jason Aldean

Chorus:

That’s the only way I know

Don’t stop till everything’s gone

Straight ahead never turn round

Don’t back up, don’t back down

Full throttle wide open

You get tired, you don’t show it

Dig a little deeper when you think you can’t dig no more

That’s the only way I know

I never got tested for the "gifted" programs in school, because school bored me to tears and I coasted by doing as little as possible. When you don't do homework or reports or projects or whatever, you don't get better than a C, even if you ace all the tests, except possibly in elementary school. And I gave up on school in 1st grade--but that's a story for another time.

I did have a lot of IQ tests when I was fairly young. My mother worked at a university, and the education department needed guinea pigs for the students to practice on. Those were so much fun! I remember once, I didn't like the lady doing the test, so I deliberately answered every possible thing wrong. She was just so flabbergasted, because I'd also been used as a demo in several classes. The professor seemed to think it was amazing that, while I was reading something aloud, if I came to a word I didn't know, I'd sound it out in my head instead of aloud. Never understood why that was surprising. Though I suppose it probably was surprising that, when he had me reading sections of their textbooks aloud, I understood what I was reading. Whatever.

All I really know is, I'm neither a dummy, nor am I what would be considered "average" today. I'm pretty smart. And everything I've done, including finally going back to school, I've done exactly the way that song says it. It may have to be my new theme song.

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Very intersting. I too have a 137 IQ and was diagnosed ADD when I was in 5th grade... only later to find out I have N... they now state that they feel the ADD diagnosis was wrong, and what I really had was struggling with symptoms of undiagnosed N....

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I was dignosed with Dyslexia in 1st grade. I can remember that is when I started getting tired. I was told that i had an IQ of 149. My mom would not let me be in the gifted program. She said that it would be to hard for me. Insted I got Specal ed. That was way to easy.my last IQ test for school was my senior year I got 147. I have never been any good at school. At 23 I did a bunch of testing to try to find out what was wrong with me. They did a IQ test is was 118. That seemed like a large drop. They said I had ADD.  Thet put me on ritalin. It worked for a few months, then the anxiety got to be too much. I think they were wrong about the ADD. The Dyslexia I think they were right or I just got a piss pore education. From a school rated number 303 top school in the nation. So when i was 31 I got the N dignoses I think they are right. What has always botherd me is the drop in my IQ. Till last year when I had my daughter tested. The Dr. said that there is a 20 Point margen of error. Well that explanes it one of them was wrong  eather the school or the ADD guys. I guess I will never know.

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I was placed in gifted classes which I then failed out of- combination of terrible home life and narcolepsy. Never got diagnosed. College didn't happen. Now I'm in night school. I have a lot of greative skills and intellectual resources which I wish I'd had treatment earlier so I could have developed more; since I didn't, i'm doing the best I can at this late juncture.

 

I think that it would be interesting to see research in this. Certainly there have been a great many gifted people over the course of history with well-documented erratic or unusual sleeping habits, so there may be a correlation.

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An Update: I was pegged as "gifted and talented" growing up. I didn't really have a problem until the middle of High school and ALL of college. Got diagnosed at the age of 25. So, I had 7-9 years where Narcolepsy started to sink in and got progressivly worse. Lifestyle changes helped me through those years.

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This will perhaps all sound sort of, or quite, wacky.!

 

It is said people learn more, or perhaps better tune what the person regularly does (activity skill and/or thought habit) through the days, during sleep dreaming

So, the fact that persons with Narcolepsy have vivid dreams and more so frequent dreaming, as well as intermixed dreaming during the wake and the sleep states; maybe such directly relates to the topic at hand. 

I don't like to think of myself as neither gifted nor talented, but it is clear to me that there are things that I naturally (such has at least felt naturally) have excelled at and/or within, as there are also things I have no ability to function with and/or participate within.  As to what I've excelled at and/or within, they would be things related directly to activities and/or thoughts which I am passionate about and/or stimulated by (therefore often or at frequent times have, dreamt about). 

Also, I very much don't like to think there is anyone (who begins, or that from when I meet is) unequal or not within the same, as all others; that is to simply try to say, that we really are only one, all of the same yet individually different in vast ways. 

As well, I like to think that there is so much more that is unknown about what we live within and what is within each of every system (taking knowledge of all combined), than there is possibly known about such (again taking all knowledge combined).  Knowing and remembering, in other words, that: 'No one, can know it all; nor can all as only one, know all.'  Such helps to take frequent steps backward in preventing becoming closed off (close-minded) like; yet that's far off the wall!.

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I think I said this in another thread, but I'm not sure so much that N and intelligence correlate, but rather, many of the symptoms of N are markedly worse in gifted individuals. I seem to recall reading lots of stuff about how smart people need more sleep on average. So I thinker higher IQs are potentially more impaired by EDS, therefore, more likely to seek treatment. Additionally, data is going to be skewed, due to the fact that many in the working class cannot afford proper healthcare, so even if they do have issues, they are less likely to seek treatment due to the expense. And since the working class is (generally, but not all for sure!) less educated, this could also help a bit in explaining the trend.

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Interesting. 

Not to leave out the fact, that the working class tends to be running (an endless race) and/or simply are without much (if any) free time to themselves, time to think outside of their career and/or job.

Another element may be, people prefer to interact often rather than to analyze often.  Reflection and contemplation, relate.

 

Definitely the 'proper healthcare' varies unfortunately, it seems for near no one that I know, possible nor affordable to actually find 'such'; unless we're speaking in regards to an perhaps injury or a minor matter.  Such is sad.

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my mom and dad tell stories of when i was young (elementary ) i would get straight A's and my teachers constantly asked my parents to place me in "gifted classes" but i refused bc i hated "work" ... 

never tried as hard as i could of in school until this school yr.. for personal "enlightenment" reasons prior to my recent dx of narcolepsy. and now with the meds i feel somewhat normal (much better than w/out meds) but i struggle with the side effects with ritalin ... try my best to not let ritalin change my personality but its pretty weird in effects on personality..

 

 

now im giving it my all in HS (very difficult still though) but man i appreciate school and my great teachers.. but ive asked myself since dx too what would i be like in school if i didn't have narcolepsy... i thought mayb it makes me smart because of the badd memory that pwn have i had to improvise in order to remember interesting subjects in school..Like math and science and what i do is figure out why? are certain things true rather than just memorizing it ..

 

but yeah just wanted to share my experience 

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I've always been considered smart, though in college, when my narc kicked in, I got good grades because I studied ALL the time since I was actually mostly sleeping during all that studying. Now that I'm medicated, I realize that the meds only help me stay awake --but I still can't concentrate. It makes me wonder if I have ADD/ADHD. I can read TMZ or organize all my files, but for the life of me, I can't sit down and read the documents I have to read for work and actually pay attention. I've told my doc, but of course, there's nothing he can do except try a new med. Do y'all have this problem? Do the meds actually allow you to concentrate?

 

Thanks.

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Not sure about, in regards to meds one way or the other (as I don't take any due to sensitivities, or the negatives outweighing the benefit).

But, I can say that there's definitely something major going on for me, in regards to whether or not I'm stimulated through interest and/or enjoyment from, or in, what I'm doing.

If a topic is dull and/or not of real interest, or engaging to me, it is likely that I won't be able to focus deeply upon it for long. 

Definitely when it comes to reading and/or doing any repetitive process, it puts me into a secondary day dreaming state and/or nodding off state -microsleeps-; even when it comes to chit chatting with people socially (am not big on socializing 'in groups' because it can be so monotonous), I find it difficult to concentrate enough to even participate.

The same sort of 'staying stimulated through interest/enjoyment' goes for activities, physically, if I'm not enjoying it then it seems to drag out over a short period of time and I'll become weak as well as tired; versus if I'm enjoying the activity, it will fly by and I'll manage it much more comfortably for longer than I expect (to be able to have managed it), often.

 

Seems to be a double edged blade, at times.

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I was taking special classes since 1st grade, they clocked me with a high IQ, but around 5th grade things got a little odd.  They put me in special classes afterschool to deal with my disorganised penmanship.  Several teachers were disputing my identification because I wasn't getting perfect on every test and couldn't write an essay to save my life and never did my homework, consistently calling me "lazy".  They were trying to label me with a learning disability as well.  My 6th grade teacher had me removed from the special classes, told everyone I was lazy and would likely drop out in highschool if I didn't get my act together and put in any effort.  She had me put in special needs classes, putting me with the "mentally challenged" kids.  Completely ruined any chance I had at achieving any academic success.  If one person had simply thought - "hmm, he looks tired all the time" instead of "he's lazy and will amount to nothing more than his stoner father", things would have gone a lot differently.  Granted, this was a few years before they would have pumped me full of ritalin.  Might have done the trick.

 

Was useless in phys-ed.  Weak, and uncoordinated.  Small town where you were nobody if you didn't play organised sports.  Really ruins any self-esteem you might have, especially when you're also from a low-income family. 

 

That's why until 3 weeks ago, I've only thought it was depression for the past 20 years.

 

As far as the correlation, it's likely one exists, but it's difficult to say which spawned the other.  Are the brains simply working at a higher activity due to the longer REM periods, or, are the longer REM periods because the brain has trouble slowing down/stopping, causing the thirst for use.

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No, I believe there is no correlation between n and intelligence. If anything, the reverse is more likely to be true in regards to neurological disorders. It is true that at either end of the bell curve, there are more behavioral abnormalities.

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I think there is likely a correlation between giftedness and those diagnosed with N. Afterall, only 25% of us are diagnosed- and it takes 10 + years to get diagnosed. It al most sounds like survival of the fittest to even arrive at a diagnosis. I wonder what that says about those of us who have managed to function this far.

It also seems terribly sad for all of those still struggling without knowing and may never know that they live with this illness. Certainly not to say they are anything less- we were all there to varying degrees.

Perhaps the giftedness lies in the resilience and perseverance of each of us who has survived the gauntlet just to arrive where we have.

The ways in which we have managed astounds me. How many poor souls who fell asleep at the wheel and lost their lives were undiagnosed. How many people who gave up on themselves and stopped trying were undiagnosed. How many people who live out their lives naively believing the wrong diagnosis are actually living with N.

I think just arriving at a diagnosis presupposes a certain level of giftedness in a number of forms- intellect, perseverance, resilience. And just living with this - known or unknown- deserves credit.

We amaze me.

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I think there might be a slight correlation with N and giftedness, seeing how well PWNs adapt to compensate for N. 

However, what I've realized is that my 'giftedness' is balanced out by N. Making me a person of normal intelligence.

 

Here's why, I was recently diagnosed with N and while I am getting treated for N, I am noticing some other issues that were prominent again before I started having these sleepy episodes so as advised by school therapists etc, I went for a series of neuropsych testing. My composite IQ score on all three of the IQ tests administered (full-length) were above 96 percentile (96th being the lowest of the three). But my grades, my life do not reflect this at all. I am lacking a lot the other skills that people were able to develop normally while I was snoozing away. Like verbal intelligence, etc. Now, I am not sure if that is a reflection of my N or my other possible issues but in my case, narcolepsy made me less "gifted" and more of normal intelligence even though I was "born" with high IQ.

 

I don't come across as "gifted" either, given that I often manage to "sleep" talk while talking to people and whatever I say makes no sense most of the time (I am sometimes told of this).

 

I guess it's how you define "giftedness". On paper, I'm gifted; in reality, I think I'm far from it.

 

If that makes any sense. I'm getting sleepy again. X

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I think there is likely a correlation between giftedness and those diagnosed with N. Afterall, only 25% of us are diagnosed- and it takes 10 + years to get diagnosed. It al most sounds like survival of the fittest to even arrive at a diagnosis. I wonder what that says about those of us who have managed to function this far.

It also seems terribly sad for all of those still struggling without knowing and may never know that they live with this illness. Certainly not to say they are anything less- we were all there to varying degrees.

..

I think just arriving at a diagnosis presupposes a certain level of giftedness in a number of forms- intellect, perseverance, resilience. And just living with this - known or unknown- deserves credit.

We amaze me.

This is incredibly true. So many PWNs (diagnosed as well as undiagnosed) will probably mention their symptoms to many people throughout their lifetime - doctors, friends, family, acquaintances, etc. Very few (that 25%) will take it a step further and search, and FIGHT, to get the truth of the whole thing. And that's on average - 10 years of searching, and fighting, to get there. We are all obviously intelligent enough to recognize at some point - that what we are experiencing is NOT normal - and resilient enough to keep fighting for the truth behind it. It's a lot of work weeding through information and symptoms, and self reflection, and talking to various medical professionals, to get there.

 

I think there might be a slight correlation with N and giftedness, seeing how well PWNs adapt to compensate for N. 

However, what I've realized is that my 'giftedness' is balanced out by N. Making me a person of normal intelligence.

This is quite true! Our sleepiness is a real downer in this sense - because while it would be great to reach our full potential - that is quite hard when we are fighting off sleep all of the time. I like to say that we are just too awesome - and the world couldn't handle us without N. I mean I know that I don't always get things done - but I can be a bit of an energizer bunny at times. I can't imagine if I did that 24/7. Obviously society just wouldn't be able to handle my awesome productive self! And so I have N - where I can be half -productive, most of the time. lol. 

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I have no idea... my son was considered to be gifted back when he was quite young and didn't have any signs of N. However, it is amusing that during his 9th and 10th grade years teachers thought he was quite blah, out-of-it, not very smart, not a great attitude, etc. (his concussion was at the end of his 8th grade year, the beginning of his narcolepsy issues). Only one teacher in that time saw that he wasn't falling asleep constantly because of attitude, and didn't seem at all surprised by the narcolepsy diagnosis. This year, getting Adderall every morning and staying awake during school - usually  ;) - his GPA has jumped way up, the teachers are amazed at his supposed change in attitude, but the only difference is being better able to control the sleeping. GPA was about 2.3, now he gets 3.9's each quarter.

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I don't know that I'd consider myself gifted, just adaptable and/or focused. I went through the Navy's Nuclear Power School back in 2007(equated to a 2 year Nuclear Engineering degree, but crammed into 6 months and having been developed by MIT) and was the bottom of both my section(30 enlisted students) and class as a whole(300 of us total) and had a hell of a time keeping up with the material. I managed to make it through the school though because even though I couldn't keep up with all the subjects at once, I could handle one or two of them at a time so I looked at our test schedule for the entire 6 months and planned out every single one of my test failures, tests that I wouldn't bother to study for period. I was able to spread out my test failures enough that I was still able to maintain passing grades overall and on a individual subject basis and ultimately made it through the school. My instructors said I had the record for highest amount of total test failures while still maintaining passing grades in all subjects.

 

But yeah, 40 hour school weeks with an additional 30-35 hours of extra study which could only be done in the school house due to the material being classified sucked. No desire to go through that ever again. That wasn't even the worst of it either, the training phase after that was all hands on technical training at an operating plant and I was putting in 100 hour work weeks on average for 4 months(6 month long training, first two months was familiarization training, so we were only putting in 12 hour days 5 days a week. Cakewalk compared to everything else I'd done in the program at that point).

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Lousyskater, that story is incredible. The way you got through Nuclear Power School is absolutely brilliant, and really creative; I would have never even thought of that! It's a great example of how important it is to first recognize and respect our limitations (and every person has those, N or no N) instead of trying to do things as if we didn't have them and hoping that will get us where we want to go. But then it's equally important to recognize we're not limited in where we want to go -- we just need to figure out a different way to get there.

Thanks for the inspiration!

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And to address the overall topic, I agree with Hank that PWN are probably not any more intelligent per se than non-PWNs, but that the ones who get diagnosed probably are, on average. I did neuropsych testing as well as in my late 20s. I'd been diagnosed with ADHD and was taking Ritalin, which changed my life with regard to being able to stay awake. I knew I was smart, but I knew I was still very absent-minded even on the Ritalin and wanted to find out where the problem was.

Sure enough, the testing showed that my IQ was very high in all domains, but my working memory was only 50th percentile. Working memory is where you hold information just long enough to either use it -- like keeping in your brain that you just put water on to boil, or remembering a phone number after you look it up, just long enough to go get your phone and dial it -- or store it in long-term memory. So yeah, I'm smart, I have no trouble figuring out things or remembering them once I have them in my head, but I'm also your typical absent-minded professor, who has to put water up to boil at least 3 times in an electric kettle before remembering to actually make the tea with it.

The interesting thing is that all this time, I thought that proved the ADHD diagnosis, because problems with attention and working memory are pathognomonic of that condition. So I figured I really did have ADHD, regardless of whether or not I also had N. But when I finally saw the sleep doc, he pointed out it's also the very cognitive domain affected by sleep deprivation. D'oh!

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