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I Am A Racing Driver.. Yeah I Know Right?


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#1 Wedge

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Posted 11 May 2010 - 10:03 AM

Hey everyone,

I noticed that driving is quite a challenge for most of the narcoleptic community. I am not sure if it is the constant noise or just boring "Sameness" that pulls us in to this mode of repetition and sleep. I rarely have problems with sleeping while driving and i think i may know why. I race a mazda mx-5 in the Sport Car Club of America and have never felt tired at high speeds and taking my car through hairpin turns! I guess constant adrenaline is the answer!

All jokes aside i actually think that i am focusing more than the average person when i drive, which is largely due to my amateur racing career. I pay attention to detailed things like tire noise and small changes in weight transfer. Since i am so focused i never really think about getting tired or never experience it. If anyone is interested i could post a write up on here on the various things you could stretch your awareness of that may help combat the constant and sleep inducing repetition of driving. The added plus is that it can make you a more aware and safe driver in the long run as well! Let me know and thanks for hearing me out. I am not sure if it will help but it works for me.


And if any of you are interested in racing and have always been worried about Narcolepsy (and get an ok from your doctor!)... feel free to PM me.

#2 schlepp

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Posted 22 October 2010 - 07:39 AM

Hey everyone,

I noticed that driving is quite a challenge for most of the narcoleptic community. I am not sure if it is the constant noise or just boring "Sameness" that pulls us in to this mode of repetition and sleep. I rarely have problems with sleeping while driving and i think i may know why. I race a mazda mx-5 in the Sport Car Club of America and have never felt tired at high speeds and taking my car through hairpin turns! I guess constant adrenaline is the answer!

All jokes aside i actually think that i am focusing more than the average person when i drive, which is largely due to my amateur racing career. I pay attention to detailed things like tire noise and small changes in weight transfer. Since i am so focused i never really think about getting tired or never experience it. If anyone is interested i could post a write up on here on the various things you could stretch your awareness of that may help combat the constant and sleep inducing repetition of driving. The added plus is that it can make you a more aware and safe driver in the long run as well! Let me know and thanks for hearing me out. I am not sure if it will help but it works for me.


And if any of you are interested in racing and have always been worried about Narcolepsy (and get an ok from your doctor!)... feel free to PM me.



I think that an intense short duration activity is a good example of an activity that a narcolepsy person might find challenging. When I race, I never really have a chance to fall asleep at the wheels. When the drive is monotonous or in darkness, that's when I find it the most difficult to drive. The best is at that point to pull over or have someone else drive the car if possible.

#3 Geohff

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Posted 23 October 2010 - 09:59 PM

One of the issues is with N, short term "excitement" may delay, lessen or offset your symptoms for a short time. That’s why when some go to have a test or see a disability evaluation they seem so "well." This works against them because it makes them seem insincere or faking when in fact they are simply hyped for that short period. It has frustrated me that when I go to see my Doctor I am almost always better than normal. So I think a vedio documentation at home of normal symptoms is a very useful tool.



#4 noddinoff

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Posted 30 December 2010 - 06:57 PM

Hey everyone,

I noticed that driving is quite a challenge for most of the narcoleptic community. I am not sure if it is the constant noise or just boring "Sameness" that pulls us in to this mode of repetition and sleep. I rarely have problems with sleeping while driving and i think i may know why. I race a mazda mx-5 in the Sport Car Club of America and have never felt tired at high speeds and taking my car through hairpin turns! I guess constant adrenaline is the answer!

All jokes aside i actually think that i am focusing more than the average person when i drive, which is largely due to my amateur racing career. I pay attention to detailed things like tire noise and small changes in weight transfer. Since i am so focused i never really think about getting tired or never experience it. If anyone is interested i could post a write up on here on the various things you could stretch your awareness of that may help combat the constant and sleep inducing repetition of driving. The added plus is that it can make you a more aware and safe driver in the long run as well! Let me know and thanks for hearing me out. I am not sure if it will help but it works for me.


And if any of you are interested in racing and have always been worried about Narcolepsy (and get an ok from your doctor!)... feel free to PM me.


Ha! I never would have thought I could find a post that would relate to my commuting/motosport situation. paying a great amount of attention to minute details on the road and possible sticky situations has become automatic. my daily driver is a Ducati Hypermotard or a 98' 916. i have never owned a vehocle with 4 wheels and now that i have been recently diagnosed with N, i intend to keep it that way. It may be the exhilaration and the constant release of adrenaline or the heightening of the senses that temporarily puts off the effects of N and cataplexy but I have never felt anything related to either while riding. Or it may be the fact that if i fall asleep on the Duc, i will probably end up in a box. I intend to keep the street as my track and now i have a nice excuse to take off my passenger pegs :)

#5 narcolexie

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Posted 02 December 2013 - 11:29 AM

This makes me wonder if my daughter's driving habits are a response to her narcolepsy. A lot if the time she "drives on the edge" only not in her mind, in the minds of her passengers. She felt really badly when it was pointed out to her recently. She has always had to drive long distances and I wonder if the "on the edge" is a way to stimulate adrenaline to keep her awake?



#6 Kimpossible

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Posted 03 December 2013 - 08:32 PM

I agree.  Speeding and talking on the phone (not necessarily together!) keep me alert when driving.  I need something to focus on (like talking on the phone) to allow me to really pay attention to my driving.  Otherwise, little things take my attention away from the road.

It's like studying and watching tv.  I can't study without it because I get distracted really easily.



#7 doinmdirndest

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Posted 04 December 2013 - 05:02 AM

wow, I can sure dig where you are coming from!   my 80+ mile drive to the active jobsite I'm on now (past sites had 90 and 100 miles each way) is conducted on the Nimitz fwy - 880 -  in east/south sf bay area.  fersure as tricky and packed a 4 or 5 lane exper. as any in the u.s.

 

I routinely use my truck on site, often debris is loaded, no paving on site yet many workdays, unless we're 60-80% complete on a given project.  guys will ALWAYS remove screws/nails seen where tires may roll; yet turned under in the soils is enough such debris is there to FLATTEN EVERY TIRE ON THE NIMITZ..........as far as the eye can see.   soooo, I get to thinking, 'it's not a ? of if, but of when I will get a flat on my way home. 

 

The "Iron Man Commute" the name my wife and I have given it, is conducted @ 70 mph.  go any slower, and you'll have frustrated commuters 'bottlenecking' behind, w/multiple passing of your rig by a closely spaced, bumper to bumper procession of other vehicles going around you. too often safety is deprioritized by those whose ire you've inspired as they scramble to get out from behind you.

 

and 880 is the world's -that's right- #1 18 wheeler route.  so, my imagination shows me slo-mo sequences of what transpires if......you know.

 

so 'weight transfer', and a host of other factors, such as reciprocating imbalances 'shimmies' and noises suggesting front end parts going out are things I take serious.   like I do collision preparedness, both in how I hold the wheel and how I load my truck, are acute components of my awarenesses as I take on each day's employment journey.

 

absolute precision I execute best as possible. each and every second.  don't tailgate though. it's dumb as h., near as I can figure.  it's  awful d. popular w/the commuters, though.

 

I have techniques, such as 'tacking' as far right as legally possible maintaining 1 lane- about 1-5" from the white dots; glances to fisheye allow my gauging this, which affords visibility of brakelights of vehicles in front of the on I'm behind.

 

checking tire pressure is a thing I do often, to say the least.  recently I obtained valve stem caps w/ green plug visible in clear end of caps if psi = 36 or >.  prior to this, 2-4 daily uses of pro trucker type pressure gauge, always 'riding shotgun' on pssngr. seat.  still sees use now and again to verify if caps are worth a s.

 

the commute is no fun.  boy, do I miss when the firm got a project about 1/2 mile from our condo!



#8 NightinPhilly

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Posted 05 December 2013 - 06:13 AM

Ha ha!!! I also drive fairly quickly and tend to approach driving as a strategic game... I'm always anticipating when to change lanes to avoid cars and maintain my desired rate of speed which on the highway is ~20-35 mph above the speed limit. I tend to be somewhat aggressive as a driver... a friend has called me 'Maria Andretti.' I often also find a pace car and try to stay alert for speed traps. I've only been pulled over once and got a warning... (knock wood). I also lived in Germany for several months and LOVED driving there! Drove my fastest ever at 125 mph (I know that's really tame to our racing friends).

 

On long drives also I tend to make phone calls (hands free :) ) and always thought I do my best talking in the car. When not on the phone, I play very fast-paced music... It does not surprised me that adrenaline might play a factor. When the doctor asked how do I stay awake at work I jokingly replied 'stress and adrenaline' but maybe that was true all along. 

 

The only times I've noticed that I get really tired on the road is when it's dark, the road is very straight and there are fewer cars. Over time I subconsciously adjusted when I travel to see family (~2.5 hrs away). In the summer I will stay much later during these visits, leaving by 7PM with no concerns; in the winter I prefer to leave closer by 3PM and have said I don't like to drive when it's dark out.  Now that I know I have N I think that's how I prevented extreme fatigue on the road...