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Teenager-Coping


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#1 umissedme

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Posted 30 December 2009 - 09:04 AM

My son is 16 and was diagnosed in August. He has been struggling for years. I know that I cannot understand what he is going through. He needs someone who is experiencing or has experienced the same things to help him. Any suggestions? I have told him to come here. He is resistant. I know he is not in the denial stage. Maybe anger or depression. Please help me help him. Yes, I know he needs to learn to help himself too. It is so hard to see him suffer.

#2 wardbennett

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Posted 30 December 2009 - 09:28 AM

My son is 16 and was diagnosed in August. He has been struggling for years. I know that I cannot understand what he is going through. He needs someone who is experiencing or has experienced the same things to help him. Any suggestions? I have told him to come here. He is resistant. I know he is not in the denial stage. Maybe anger or depression. Please help me help him. Yes, I know he needs to learn to help himself too. It is so hard to see him suffer.


My son was diagnosed during the year he took off between High School and College. He too had been struggling since middle school. At times he has said he wished he had never been diagnosed which surprised me. His sleep doctor has not been helpful with anything other than the diagnosis and medication. Various therapists treated his emotional difficulties as straight depression rather than helping him address the chronic health issue. He is now a junior in college and is seeing a therapist who is helping him specifically with the issues related to narcolepsy and this is helping. I strongly recommend your getting a therapist adept in chronic health issues in adolescents. I wish we had done it earlier.

My son hasn't been keen on coming to forums, either. But there is a new blog written by a young woman. She is an excellent writer, and has obviously researched treatments and ways of coping diligently. She was diagnosed when around 9 and is now in her late twenties. Just in the brief time I have been reading her blog I have learned a lot about young people adjusting to life with narcolepsy. She's upbeat, funny, but realistic. She gives you hope. <http://www.nisfornarcolepsy.com/>

-Tina

#3 merrymom1013

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Posted 02 January 2010 - 09:03 PM

My daughter, 17, was diagnosed at 11. I found these forums helpful to me- it gave me a much better understanding of what life is like with narcolepsy. It took my daughter a long time to "own" her narcolepsy. For a long time she wanted to use her awake/alert time to focus on her friends and feeling normal. The maturity & acceptance take a long time, & sometimes it is one more thing to battle your parents about. As parents, we are worrying about the narcolepsy- they are much more worried about being teenagers. I agree with the counseling recommendation- but of course your son has to be ready & willing for that as well. My suggestions are to make information & support easily accessible & step back. In the meantime, educate yourself & do all you can to make sure he has the right medical care & medications that work for him, and any accommodations & supports he needs at school.