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Our Profound Interconnectedness


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#1 ayesart

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Posted 30 October 2009 - 08:19 AM

This morning I received an E mail from Family Tree DNA informing me that I had another exact yDNA match within 12 markers. My test results yielded 37 markers because I wanted more information on my yDNA.
I wrote a little about my father's yDNA origin. His family came from Northern Ireland but...The men in the family should have been testing with Irish sequences in their results; instead their test results came back E3b2, Berber or Phoenician.

Once I received my yDNA results in the year of 2005 I was surprised and astounded at how many other people in the world matched my yDNA sequences. As a result of these many, many matches I began to realize that what the ancient peoples talked about regarding humanities interconnectedness was being confirmed on a day to day basis with every person who has tested their yDNA or mtDNA.

As you know already I have the symptoms of narcolepsy that are undiagnosed. If the DNA test I took in Jacksonville comes back positive for Narcolepsy then perhaps those people who match my yDNA and mtDNA might also have symptoms diagnosed and undiagnosed of Narcolepsy too, providing the Narcolepsy was passed to me via my paternal or maternal genetics.

Astounding! No?

It also makes one wonder why we have continued to fight in so many wars against each other. That's another thing one should be thinking about since the DNA evidence is revealing to us that we are indeed related to one another.

I don't know the people who match my father's yDNA. I have their names and E mail addresses but I really don't know them at all. They are complete strangers. But they are in essence family to me because we share a common bond with one another on a genetic and molecular level.

In any case I went to my page at Family Tree DNA and decided to share one of my pages with everyone here so they can witness how many persons from different countries my ancestral paternal DNA matches.
Its something to think about.

Enjoy.

Ayesart

Note: I have placed in bold type those countries where I have more than 3 yDNA matches. The percentage numbers are relative to the number of individuals who live in that country. The higher the matches in number the higher the percentage gets.

Another interesting note: Within my father's yDNA there are J2 sequences that are indicative of Ashkenazi ancestry getting into his family tree. These individuals are of the Jewish faith.

I also have a large amount of yDNA matches in England. Which I find very interesting.

12 marker matches reveal a lesser amount of relationship to the individual within the present day. They might be said to be 15th cousins 25 times removed from my founding ancestor. The greater the number of markers ie, 37 to 67 the more related the individual is to me and my founding ancestor.

The section of the chart that states how many mutations have occured within my matches yDNA signal that their sequences have moved away from mine by 1 or 2.
The greater that number is reveals that the matches relationship to my ancestors go back 16 generations with the number 1 and the number 2 means that the relationship goes back more than 21 geneartions within my ancestry.

You match 5 person out of 19,508 people from England, this is < 0.1% of the population tested from England.

12 Marker Y-DNA Matches
Exact Matches
Country Your Matches Comment Match Total Country Total Percentage
Algeria 5 - 5 57 N/A
Colombia 1 - 1 68 N/A
Cote D'Ivoire (Republic of the Ivory Coast) 1 - 1 33 N/A
Egypt 1 - 1 50 N/A
England 5 - 5 19,508 < 0.1%
France 6 - 6 2,742 0.2%
Germany 14 - 14 9,847 0.1%
Hungary 1 - 1 926 0.1%
Ireland 4 - 4 11,242 < 0.1%
Italy 11 - 15 2,856 0.5%
4 Sicily
Lebanon 2 - 2 192 1.0%
Libyan Arab Jamahiriya 2 - 2 10 N/A
Mexico 1 - 1 627 0.2%
Morocco 5 - 6 54 N/A
1 Rif
Netherlands 7 - 7 1,368 0.5%
Norway 1 - 1 1,088 0.1%
Philippines 1 - 1 188 0.5%
Poland 4 Prussia 4 2,956 0.1%
Portugal 6 - 7 642 1.1%
1 Azores
Puerto Rico 1 - 1 157 0.6%
Russian Federation 5 - 5 2,543 0.2%
Scotland 3 - 3 9,005 < 0.1%
Somalia 1 - 1 5 N/A
Spain 30 - 33 2,752 1.2%
1 MDKO: Mexico
1 MDKO: Puerto Rico
1 Navarra
Tunisia 1 - 1 20 N/A
Ukraine 10 - 10 1,243 0.8%
United Kingdom 4 - 4 8,678 < 0.1%
United States 1 - 1 1,254 0.1%
Venezuela 1 - 1 28 N/A
Wales 1 - 1 1,632 0.1%

One Step Mutations
Country Your Matches Comment Match Total Country Total Percentage
Algeria 8 - 8 57 N/A
Belarus 1 - 2 539 0.4%
1 Ashkenazi
Brazil 1 - 1 43 N/A
Cape Verde 1 - 1 19 N/A
Costa Rica 1 - 1 9 N/A
Cuba 1 - 1 67 N/A
Dominican Republic 1 - 1 13 N/A
Egypt 2 - 2 50 N/A
England 14 - 14 19,508 0.1%
France 11 - 11 2,742 0.4%
Germany 5 - 5 9,847 0.1%
Greece 1 - 1 603 0.2%
Ireland 3 - 3 11,242 < 0.1%
Italy 11 - 14 2,856 0.5%
3 Sicily
Libyan Arab Jamahiriya 1 - 1 10 N/A
Lithuania 2 Ashkenazi 3 805 0.4%
1 Vilna
Mexico 2 - 2 627 0.3%
Morocco 6 - 6 54 N/A
Netherlands 2 - 2 1,368 0.1%
Peru 1 - 1 28 N/A
Poland 5 - 7 2,956 0.2%
2 Prussia
Portugal 12 - 13 642 2.0%
1 Azores
Puerto Rico 3 - 4 157 2.5%
1 MDKO: Puerto Rico
Russian Federation 4 - 5 2,543 0.2%
1 Ashkenazi
Scotland 5 - 5 9,005 0.1%
Spain 27 - 27 2,752 1.0%
Sweden 2 - 2 1,339 0.1%
Switzerland 1 Schwyz 2 1,448 0.1%
1 St. Gallen
Tunisia 2 - 2 20 N/A
Turkey 1 - 1 337 0.3%
Ukraine 2 - 4 1,243 0.3%
1 Ashkenazi
1 Ashkenazi (Galicia)
United Kingdom 5 - 5 8,678 0.1%
United States 1 - 1 1,254 0.1%
Wales 2 - 2 1,632 0.1%

25 Marker Y-DNA Matches
One Step Mutations
Country Your Matches Comment Match Total Country Total Percentage
Lebanon 1 - 1 46 N/A
Two Step Mutations
Country Your Matches Comment Match Total Country Total Percentage
Germany 2 - 2 4,932 < 0.1%
Portugal 1 Azores 1 228 0.4%
Spain 1 MDKO: Mexico 1 1,054 0.1%

The next chart reveals individuals who match my mother's mtDNA.
HVR1 matches reveal more distant relationship. HVR2 matches reveal relationships within the 1400's through the 20th century. I have matched two individuals who had a paper trail in place, this means they had a family tree in place where we could compare and actually connect ancestors who came from a specific branch within a family. That was exciting for me and my wife.

I say exciting for my wife too because during the 700 AD and the years that covered the 1300's through the 16 hundreds our family lines came together many time. In essence my wife is a distant but close cousin many times over. We never knew that before until I had begun working on her family tree after we had gotten married.

My mother's mtDNA reveals that we have a lot of matches in the south American countries as well as in Spain and Canada. The Ayes originated in France and during the 1000 AD came to Spain to fight the Moors on behalf of the Spanish kings of the time.

One match that shows here as Russian sent me an E mail. She was trying to figure out how she ended up with Haplo Group C mtDNA. Haplo Group C mtDNA belongs to Indigenous people. She is Chinese with ancestry in Mongolia and Russia!

By the way, I don't beleive in the Bering Strait theory. Haplo Group C is very weak in China and Mongolia. It is stronger within South America as far south as you can go above the artic region. This tells me that my ancestors came up from the extreme south of the American continent which includes South America. One you say I am more southerner than the southerners in the USA! (Joke.)

Well, I hope everyone who has read what I have written finds the data interesting. I have done a lot of work educating myself to learn all I can about the DNA stuff. I hope it wasn't too confusing, I really tried to keep the technical jargon down as much as possible.

Let me know what you think by way of feedback. Exchange of ideas leads to more learning for all of us. I am no expert.....I am still learning as the science progresses and evolves.

ou match 8 person out of 144 people from Canada, this is 5.6% of the population tested from Canada.




LOW RESOLUTION (HVR1) MATCHES

Country Your Matches Comment Match Total Country Total Percentage
Argentina 1 - 1 15 N/A
Belize 1 - 1 6 N/A
Bolivia 1 - 1 9 N/A
Brazil 1 - 1 53 N/A
Canada 8 - 8 144 5.6%
Chile 5 - 5 42 N/A
Colombia 1 - 1 110 0.9%
Cuba 3 - 3 70 N/A
Ecuador 4 - 4 24 N/A
England 1 - 1 6,061 < 0.1%
France 1 - 1 2,192 < 0.1%
Germany 2 - 2 6,893 < 0.1%
Guatemala 1 - 1 35 N/A
Mexico 58 - 58 855 6.8%
Peru 3 - 3 28 N/A
Puerto Rico 60 - 69 281 24.6%
2 Native American
7 Taino
Russian Federation 1 - 1 1,283 0.1%
Spain 11 - 12 1,203 1.0%
1 Native American
United States 31 - 32 793 4.0%
1 Native American
Venezuela 3 - 3 34 N/A

#2 sleepless sleeper

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Posted 02 November 2009 - 06:03 PM

I want to get this done. My dad is mostly Choctaw, but i've heard various stories about who was what and ... well. I don't know. Stories get muddled up.

there is a haplotype that crosses over with a few NA that is asian. i have some research on this. actually, it is bookmarks in my browser. haha

again, i want to say more, but having to think something through and organize it is hard right now.

#3 ayesart

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Posted 02 November 2009 - 08:22 PM

I want to get this done. My dad is mostly Choctaw, but i've heard various stories about who was what and ... well. I don't know. Stories get muddled up.

there is a haplotype that crosses over with a few NA that is asian. i have some research on this. actually, it is bookmarks in my browser. haha

again, i want to say more, but having to think something through and organize it is hard right now.


If you have Choctaw ancestry then your brothers and uncles yDNA results would show Haplo Group A,C,D, or X.
These Haplo Groups are very strong and will tend overwrite - ansorb European Haplo Groups that might be in their ancestry.That's what happened to me regarding mtDNA, maternal DNA. I should be showing either French, or Spanish but these Haplogroups have taken a back seat to Haplo Group C. Today's DNA science cannot really tell you which tribe is in your ancestry for sure. They can only tell you that, yes, you do have a haplo group within A,C,D or X. According to DNA papers that have been written Japanese have a specific thing going on regarding their Narcolepsy that doesn't concur with their European counterparts. I think DNA science has been looking at the wrong cause within the genetics of persons with N. N is N and one just has to succumb to those sleep attacks when they come. MJD has some very specific markers, CAG....The more CAG one has the symptoms become worse and more intense. The same thing might go with N. Both conditions present different levels of challenges. From minor to major symptoms.

Thanks for taking the time to read and comment on my post.

Keep pushing....

Ayesart

#4 sleepless sleeper

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Posted 10 November 2009 - 12:51 AM

Can women not be tested for haplo groups? There is a project for the white side of my daddy's family that shows ancestory to the vikings. They say only the males can be tested for this project, and I assumed that it was just for the project.

If so, I wonder why haplo grouping cannot be seen on the x chromosome. More research to do.

#5 ayesart

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Posted 12 November 2009 - 08:47 AM

Can women not be tested for haplo groups? There is a project for the white side of my daddy's family that shows ancestory to the vikings. They say only the males can be tested for this project, and I assumed that it was just for the project.

If so, I wonder why haplo grouping cannot be seen on the x chromosome. More research to do.


The answer you seek may lay in the fact that yDNA that is passed from father to son never mutates. Its like placing an original of a document in a Xerox copy machine. The same old, same old sequences are repeated throughout the generations without any changes.

The mtDNA is a different story. It mutates and changes, they say once every 3,000 years. But I think they are finding out that the maternal DNA mutates more frequently.

I hope this helps you.

Ayes

#6 sleepless sleeper

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Posted 12 November 2009 - 03:57 PM

The answer you seek may lay in the fact that yDNA that is passed from father to son never mutates. Its like placing an original of a document in a Xerox copy machine. The same old, same old sequences are repeated throughout the generations without any changes.

The mtDNA is a different story. It mutates and changes, they say once every 3,000 years. But I think they are finding out that the maternal DNA mutates more frequently.

I hope this helps you.

Ayes



thanks for the input