Jump to content


Photo

North Carolina Law (Out Of State)


  • Please log in to reply
1 reply to this topic

#1 drago

drago

    Member

  • Members
  • 225 posts

Posted 26 August 2009 - 01:50 AM

I'm becoming incredibly frustrated not by the law, but the complete and utter lack of any resources by which to find it. I am a registered & licensed driver in Connecticut. I lived in Maine (where I was diagnosed with narcolepsy) and am now living in Alaska. I'll be living in North Carolina for nine months starting November. I have heard NC has very restrictive laws regarding narcolepsy, including the lack of reporting the diagnosis to the DMV considered "DWI" if it is discovered. (?!)

However, I'm a temporary resident... And I have not found one lick of information on the DMV website for NC, nor anywhere else. I found some Google Book results that said NC requires "the patient be symptom free for a year." However, it does not qualify which "symptoms" you are free of. EDS? Sleep Attacks? What about if I only experience symptom when I can't take my medication? (EG: When I had food poisoning.)

I am very frustrated with the lack of resources I am finding, and I am certain that me not knowing this information will not be a mitigating factor if I experience issues in North Carolina.

If it's on a case-by-case basis, do drivers who are licensed out of state have to report to NC's DMV? Would they accept a report from an out-of-state sleep doctor?

...and I heard CT's Laws are strict, too, but I can't find any information, either! Why isn't there a website with a chart with this information on it????

drago

#2 eversleepy

eversleepy

    Member

  • Members
  • 4 posts

Posted 26 October 2009 - 06:23 PM

I was diagnosed in CT back in 1990. At that time there was not a restriction in the state on driving. It is quite possible that has changed over the years but i really am not sure. I guess legally you are responsable for knowing the laws of the state you are driving in thus your frustration. If they don't make it public or have a sign when entering the state how can they hold one resposnable if they are just passing through. While you will be there for an extented period you probably will not be switching your license over to North Carolina anyway so if it was me I would just worry about the state where I reside and not worry about states that I am visiting. I will look into a little more and see if I can learn anything and post it here. I have family that work for federal government, a friend that works for VA DMV, and a brother who is a Metro DC Police Officer. I'll put the quesetion out to them and see what I learn. If you don't have issues driving that is great and under treatment you should be fine. When I was in CT for a short time I worked as a Volunteer Fire Fighter and I know the ruling then was it is your doctors choice if you should be driving or not. I had to get a letter from my doctor clearing me for active duty. Perhaps that would be a fix for your problem. If you asked your doctor to write a letter stating that under treatment you are fine to drive that might clear up any issues that arise.
I know its not an answer but perhaps that will help.



I'm becoming incredibly frustrated not by the law, but the complete and utter lack of any resources by which to find it. I am a registered & licensed driver in Connecticut. I lived in Maine (where I was diagnosed with narcolepsy) and am now living in Alaska. I'll be living in North Carolina for nine months starting November. I have heard NC has very restrictive laws regarding narcolepsy, including the lack of reporting the diagnosis to the DMV considered "DWI" if it is discovered. (?!)

However, I'm a temporary resident... And I have not found one lick of information on the DMV website for NC, nor anywhere else. I found some Google Book results that said NC requires "the patient be symptom free for a year." However, it does not qualify which "symptoms" you are free of. EDS? Sleep Attacks? What about if I only experience symptom when I can't take my medication? (EG: When I had food poisoning.)

I am very frustrated with the lack of resources I am finding, and I am certain that me not knowing this information will not be a mitigating factor if I experience issues in North Carolina.

If it's on a case-by-case basis, do drivers who are licensed out of state have to report to NC's DMV? Would they accept a report from an out-of-state sleep doctor?

...and I heard CT's Laws are strict, too, but I can't find any information, either! Why isn't there a website with a chart with this information on it????

drago