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Ptsd Can Lead To Autoimmune Disorders?


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Poll: Trauma Drama (13 member(s) have cast votes)

Did you suffer from any traumatic events around the time of your onset?

  1. Yes (7 votes [53.85%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 53.85%

  2. No (3 votes [23.08%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 23.08%

  3. Unsure (3 votes [23.08%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 23.08%

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#1 Marcianna

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Posted 29 July 2009 - 06:51 AM

I was reading this article about Post Traumatic Stress Disorder today and ran across this little spec of info. (Mayo Clinic)

Has anyone else ever heard of this?

#2 Andrea Egan

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Posted 29 July 2009 - 09:45 AM

I had heard it may be due to chronically high levels of the stress hormone, cortisol, which raises blood pressure, alters brain chemistry (causes depression, etc.) and affects metabolic processes. Studies have shown a negative relationship between cortisol levels and the body's ability to heal.

#3 sunrisemoon

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Posted 30 July 2009 - 07:38 AM

I had heard it may be due to chronically high levels of the stress hormone, cortisol, which raises blood pressure, alters brain chemistry (causes depression, etc.) and affects metabolic processes. Studies have shown a negative relationship between cortisol levels and the body's ability to heal.

Yep. The body reacts to mental stress in exactly the same way it does physical stress, in preparation for a 'fight or flight' response. Sugars and fats are released into the bloodstream to provide more energy, serum insulin levels increase, cortisol increases, as well as other 'stress hormones'. In our ancestors, this worked well because it provided energy when they needed it, but once the stress (generally physical) was over, the body stopped releasing all those sugars and fats and blood glucose levels evened out. These days, our mental stress can be quite prolonged and/or intense, so the body keeps on working on that stress response. The result is that all that energy that is not used, gets stored - and we get fat. It also means those stress hormones hang around in our bodies for longer periods of time, leading to things like insulin resistance, diabetes (Type 1 is an auto-immune disease by the way), high blood pressure, left ventricular hypertrophy and other cardiovascular diseases.

It makes total sense that a highly stressful incident or accident could cause a long term, negative auto-immune response.

#4 Marcianna

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Posted 03 August 2009 - 02:46 PM

ugh.
Freaking wonderful.

Well... that explains alot! thank you!

#5 Mike M

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Posted 07 August 2009 - 06:41 PM

I too have heard of this. In fact, I have corresponded with a woman who was being treated for PTSD whose therapist then recommended that she get tested for narcolepsy. Turned out, she had narcolepsy, possibly caused by PTSD. Wild, huh?