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Awkward Moment In Psych Class...


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#21 Stacy D

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Posted 28 August 2009 - 01:22 AM

EWW - That sounds like something that could really help PWN everywhere. I have such a hard time being descriptive enough to my supervisors at work. I get a lot of the "yeah, I'm tired too". I tried to describe the SP and HH and they thought I was on drugs. I was recently asked if I was suicidal.

I also think your boyfriend's perspective will help a lot for those who have to live with PWN. My husband had a really hard time before I was diagnosed, but now he is the only person who comes close to understanding because he lives with it and he's the only one I can count on to make the point to others that I can't help it.

I really liked the spoon theory and I'm going to share it with others as I tell them I have N. It's similar to how I've described things to my husband, especially learning to have a reserve spoon. Sometimes my day starts out so good I end up over-doing it and spend all my spoons for the next day. The last time I did that I slept 36 hours straight not even peeing. THAT did not go over well. I have to remind him sometimes when he pushes me to do things that it may mean losing the next day.


#22 psocoptera

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Posted 29 August 2009 - 10:43 AM

EWW- I agree, that would be very helpful.

I think it is also important to get a good set of descriptions of cataplexy from the patient's point of view and in the patient's own words. I hardly have cataplexy at all (and usually so mild that I am not always sure that it happened), but I get so angry when I read that people with clear-cut C don't get a diagnosis for years. Researchers consider C pathagnomonic for narcolepsy, which means that if it is present, you have narcolepsy (few rare exceptions). I am disturbed by how few primary care doctors even know what it is. I even have a textbook from a class three years ago that describes C only as complete voluntary muscle paralysis.

#23 drago

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Posted 30 August 2009 - 05:08 AM

This week in my online Psych class we're learning about sleep! Woohoo! There are a few basic (and I mean BASIC) paragraphs about sleep disorders in the text but the week's discussion topic is a case of a man who killed his mother-in-law and claimed to be asleep during the act. He was acquitted or the charges were dropped or whatever. Apparently the man suffers from RBD and turned himself in to the police. Anyways, the discussion basically circles around should he be held legally responsible for his actions. It was highly uncomfortable for me to see all the posts (it's an online class with a discussion forum) that say it's impossible to drive somewhere asleep, he wouldn't have such awful dreams if he wasn't psychologically unbalanced and so on. I posted far more indepth things about PSGs, sleep stages and at one point I used several articles i have on differences in the dream content of people with sleep disorders to counter all that bull*BEEP*. It's awkward but I think it'd be even more so to "come out of the Narc closet" and I really don't have to deal with that for the rest of the semester. I would be happy to get further into it if they would engage in dialogue with me but no one has responded to any of my posts. They post around my responses. Grrr.


I had particularly terrible dreams as a child, and there was nothing imbalanced about me. My first memory is when I had an episode of sleep paralysis in one of the large chairs my parents kept in the living room at the age of 2. It was terrifying, and I remember trying to explain what happened to my mother. I was "stuck" in the chair. Unfortunately, as a child, I literally got 'stuck' in chairs (I would sink in between cushions and get 'stuck.') But I had no other word for describing the situation... and, to be fair, I was 2. How many words could I know? Right?

I always find it interesting when people say, "It's impossible to...while sleeping." Why? If you do basic research, you can find information on the internet, among many books, on "doing things while asleep." During high school, I often found myself answering the phone when people called me during my 'naptime' and not remembering it the next day, as I went to sleep straight afterward. :-\

But, I've found that people often have the same misconceptions about any kind of disorder related to brain chemicals and stuff. A friend of mine told me that he didn't "understand" depression, since "depression is a state of mind." I told him that the separation of "mind" and "brain" doesn't really exist in the way that he thinks. Maybe there is nothing physically harming you - but if the stuff in your brain that signals pain somewhere is signaling, you will feel it. It's the same thing with depression... well, clinical depression, I mean. The only reason it "doesn't make sense" is that a lot of people have been taught the artificial idea of "mind" vs. "body" ... as if the two are at odds with each other... or something.

If no one is responding to your posts, that probably means that they are either unwilling to read your references, or they agree with you... or, and most likely, they probably really want to believe it is impossible to do certain things or to have 'such bad dreams' unless you're psychologically unbalanced. But, since it's a post... maybe people will read it and learn something.

I tended to be "that person" (with the awkward moments) in college, too. When people would make a comment about women not working, I would be the first to point out that "women belong in the home/women don't have a job" was actually a development from a middle-class value system in America in the1800s... and many people believe this was how it was for almost all cultures before 1900, or they speak as if that was true. But in reality, male or female, if you were poor, you worked. Period. And oftentimes women would be expected to work even when cultural norms or events - such as foot-binding, pregnancy, and other physically limiting factors - would make people today think they should ... take a break. I found that people who disagreed with me or questioned my points either benefited me by making me think about the subject in a new light, or, if the question wasn't all that good, revealed stuff about their thoughts/assumptions that contributed to the discussion. So... even if it is awkward and people avoid replying... good job!!! :)

drago

#24 GaryReimer

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Posted 07 January 2010 - 06:18 PM

This week in my online Psych class we're learning about sleep! Woohoo! There are a few basic (and I mean BASIC) paragraphs about sleep disorders in the text but the week's discussion topic is a case of a man who killed his mother-in-law and claimed to be asleep during the act. He was acquitted or the charges were dropped or whatever. Apparently the man suffers from RBD and turned himself in to the police. Anyways, the discussion basically circles around should he be held legally responsible for his actions. It was highly uncomfortable for me to see all the posts (it's an online class with a discussion forum) that say it's impossible to drive somewhere asleep, he wouldn't have such awful dreams if he wasn't psychologically unbalanced and so on. I posted far more indepth things about PSGs, sleep stages and at one point I used several articles i have on differences in the dream content of people with sleep disorders to counter all that bull*BEEP*. It's awkward but I think it'd be even more so to "come out of the Narc closet" and I really don't have to deal with that for the rest of the semester. I would be happy to get further into it if they would engage in dialogue with me but no one has responded to any of my posts. They post around my responses. Grrr.


"They post around my responses. Grrr."

Ha, sounds about right, its the same way my doctors act. The way I look at it, if you choose to study anything to the point where it has practical application... expect that EVERY time. (I have faced that with teachers, and bosses, in architecture, mechancial engineering, and business). No matter the area of supposed knowledge, I have run into that on Narcolepsy forums as well when specifically asking for feedback.