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Curiosity In Development


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Poll: Birth month and illness poll (23 member(s) have cast votes)

In which month were you born?

  1. January (2 votes [8.70%])

    Percentage of vote: 8.70%

  2. February (0 votes [0.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 0.00%

  3. March (2 votes [8.70%])

    Percentage of vote: 8.70%

  4. April (2 votes [8.70%])

    Percentage of vote: 8.70%

  5. May (3 votes [13.04%])

    Percentage of vote: 13.04%

  6. June (0 votes [0.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 0.00%

  7. July (1 votes [4.35%])

    Percentage of vote: 4.35%

  8. August (3 votes [13.04%])

    Percentage of vote: 13.04%

  9. September (2 votes [8.70%])

    Percentage of vote: 8.70%

  10. October (1 votes [4.35%])

    Percentage of vote: 4.35%

  11. November (3 votes [13.04%])

    Percentage of vote: 13.04%

  12. December (4 votes [17.39%])

    Percentage of vote: 17.39%

Was your mother ill when she was pregnant with you? Feel free to post more information in the actual thread.

  1. Yes (3 votes [13.04%])

    Percentage of vote: 13.04%

  2. No (7 votes [30.43%])

    Percentage of vote: 30.43%

  3. Not sure (13 votes [56.52%])

    Percentage of vote: 56.52%

Did you have an illness that preceded your onset of narcolepsy? Feel free to post more information in the actual thread.

  1. Yes, mono (glandular fever) (6 votes [26.09%])

    Percentage of vote: 26.09%

  2. Yes, chicken pox (shingles) (0 votes [0.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 0.00%

  3. Yes, severe viral infection (0 votes [0.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 0.00%

  4. Yes, repeated ear infections (0 votes [0.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 0.00%

  5. Yes, other illness (2 votes [8.70%])

    Percentage of vote: 8.70%

  6. No (8 votes [34.78%])

    Percentage of vote: 34.78%

  7. Not sure (7 votes [30.43%])

    Percentage of vote: 30.43%

Vote Guests cannot vote

#1 Irishhh

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Posted 12 March 2009 - 01:14 PM

Iím curious about those who experience hallucinations or even paralysis. When you were kids did you ever have night terrors? I had them for years. My parents have told me that Iíd stare off and either couldnít or wouldnít respond. All I would do is scream and cry. I didnít appear to recognize anyone in my family at all. I'd like to know if many other narcoleptics had hallucinations as a kid if aware of it happening.

Iím the only child of my parents (they both had children in previous marriages) so I canít compare myself to my siblings as all six of them do not have narcolepsy (as far as we know).

I was reading something while researching one day that said there was a study done about possible infections during pregnancy. They said that of the people they tested 45% were born in March. The least likely occurrence of narcolepsy came to people born in September. It had something to do with when cold/flu season starts being around September, and how a mother may be infected during pregnancy, believing that certain antibodies may be destroyed in fetal development. It had something to do with what trimester the mother was in during cold/flu season, and the date of conception. A theory they wanted to test I supposeÖ Apparently no other months showed anything significant one way or the other.

I may not have all of the details, and Iím trying to find the article again. I havenít been able to so far, but I will post it if I do.

Anyway, just wondering, what are all of your birth months? What time of day were you born (if you know)?
I was born March 7, 1986 at 11:11 p.m. Ė which makes me curious since Iím one of those March weirdos.

#2 Marcianna

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Posted 12 March 2009 - 01:56 PM

THAT is incredibly interesting! I myself was born in January, and since I am so keen on leaving birthday comments on peoples pages, I will say that there seems to be more and more of us winter babies. Do you know who is doing this research? can you give us a link to where you found this information?

#3 Irishhh

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Posted 12 March 2009 - 02:22 PM

QUOTE (Marcianna @ Mar 12 2009, 10:56 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
THAT is incredibly interesting! I myself was born in January, and since I am so keen on leaving birthday comments on peoples pages, I will say that there seems to be more and more of us winter babies. Do you know who is doing this research? can you give us a link to where you found this information?


Since learning I have narcolepsy (march 6, 2009, I'm brand new), I have researched like crazy reading every article I can find. As soon as I figure out where I read it I will totally post it for you!

#4 Henry G

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Posted 12 March 2009 - 03:36 PM

I was born in January

but on the southern hemisphere

so technically i am a Summer Baby yeah !! cool.gif

#5 eww

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Posted 12 March 2009 - 04:26 PM

January here. And what trimester are we talking for the infection? Because I can actually look it up. My mother kept a diary while she was pregnant.

#6 Marcianna

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Posted 12 March 2009 - 09:35 PM

I was just telling my mother about this and she told me that she was health as a horse all the way through her pregnancy with me, but Got sick during the labor part and developed a High fever and was not allowed to see me for three days. So....weird. The search for answers continues...

#7 sleepless sleeper

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Posted 12 March 2009 - 09:45 PM

My mother had horrible pneumonia for a while before I was born. They also took me away from her right after she delivered me because she was so sick.

#8 sleepless sleeper

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Posted 13 March 2009 - 09:33 AM

Perhaps they COULD have dropped me on my head...
dat wood essplain y I r b'n diz way

#9 petra

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Posted 13 March 2009 - 10:11 AM

Or a vitamin D, sunlight thing? Like in MS.

#10 sleepless sleeper

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Posted 13 March 2009 - 10:16 AM

in answer to me being dropped on my head?

vit. D deficiency? sunight deficiency?

or was this to someone else

#11 Irishhh

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Posted 13 March 2009 - 09:10 PM

Okay ladies and gents. I found a ton of articles actually! If you just go to the wonderful google, and type in: narcolepsy and birth date, or narcolepsy and birth month. Anything along the lines of narcolepsy and being born, you should find all kinds of articles. I of course looked through them, and although a lot of them seemed to have basically the same information... I really can't remember which one was the one I read before. Sorry! My forgetful brain....

Today sucked b/c I was too tired to visit my friends sad.gif

My friend just moved back from Tennessee and wanted me to meet her boyfriend. As much as I really do miss her, I just couldn't get myself to go. Ugh... This is the times that I really hate it.

#12 petra

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Posted 14 March 2009 - 05:46 AM


"in answer to me being dropped on my head?

vit. D deficiency? sunight deficiency?

or was this to someone else"


I was answering a few posts back without quoting - for the nth time this week, thought I was making sense beyond the inside of my head. I was wondering if sunlight was another way birth month influences susceptibility.


#13 dogdreams

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Posted 14 March 2009 - 01:23 PM

June baby here. But I recently found out that my mom had terrible food & pollen allergies and was injecting herself with the things she was allergic to so she could get pregnant (and also while she was pregnant.) So perhaps her immune reactions to these allergens, and my prenatal exposure to them (materno-fetal allergen transfer) was like your moms' illnesses? Who knows! All I know is, not only do I have the typical C triggers, but my allergies to these same pollens & foods trigger my N/C, too. I can't help but think there's a connection. It makes me sad and angry when doctors tell me I don't have N because my C is also triggered by these other things. I mean, they don't even bother to find out why. They just blow me off. dry.gif What makes me a less legitimate PWN than all of you? Nothing. Someday...someday, mark my words, I will have something on paper certifying me as a genuine bona fide PWN and no dr will ever question my N/C again, and will, instead, gladly help me and treat me with respect. (and then I woke up. haha) rolleyes.gif

#14 sleepless sleeper

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Posted 14 March 2009 - 05:21 PM

dogdreams, I'm so sorry that you have to go through this. It does seem that there are a lot of people that have N that, for whatever reason(s), doctors refuse to give this dx to. I do NOT understand why. When you look at the outcome, it can't be financial. I once asked the psychiatrist that my GP told me that I "needed" to see why he never questioned my EDS. He said that sleep tests were expensive. I rebuttled with, try adding the dollars spent on YEARS of being told to go see therapists and psychiatrists because I was depressed - even thought I didn't know. This guy was voted by his peers as the best in the state. After reading your post from a couple of months ago re: Stanford's definition of N, I was really upset for a lot of PWN's. The toll that misdx takes on people is rough. From various posts on here, it seems that most misdx are psychological, which at least for me, makes life super tough. I think one of the harshest realities that I've had to face is my family not wanting to accept a N dx because of all the years of misdx. I think that there are a few others on this forum that understand this. It's only been a bit more than a decade since N has begun to unvail its secrets, but at least some doctors were acknowledging that there was more to n than just going to sleep without warning. If I recall correctly, a PWN could have one of 4 or 5 symptoms to be classified as a PWN. Maybe that included "in addition to EDS". Now it seems that if you have C that it must be a certain kind. I've probably got it all wrong. I haven't researched N in a few months, and my memory isn't the best.

But back to the reason for this post: I'm really sorry that you and everyone else must jump through so many hoops. Jumping takes so much energy sad.gif

#15 sleepless sleeper

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Posted 14 March 2009 - 05:23 PM

QUOTE (petra @ Mar 14 2009, 04:46 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I was answering a few posts back without quoting - for the nth time this week, thought I was making sense beyond the inside of my head. I was wondering if sunlight was another way birth month influences susceptibility.


Sorry, Thursday and Friday were my coping days. You've made complete sense. It's been me.

#16 dogdreams

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Posted 14 March 2009 - 06:49 PM

QUOTE (sleepless sleeper @ Mar 14 2009, 03:21 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
After reading your post from a couple of months ago re: Stanford's definition of N, I was really upset for a lot of PWN's.


You know, I have to retract what I said about Stanford. I think the real problem is that sleep docs are misinterpreting what Stanford is saying in their studies. I have heard a lot lately that Stanford recognizes variation in symptoms among PWN and are trying to understand why. But it seems that when they publish any paper, the docs take it as absolute, beginning and end, alpha and omega, and turn around and screw the patient with an "all or nothing" attitude. Then all the patient hears is "Well, Stanford said...therefore you're outta luck" and people like me get mad at Stanford. But now that I've seen and heard more from the source, I think I may have been wrong.

#17 sleepless sleeper

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Posted 14 March 2009 - 07:41 PM

Of course, I didn't follow up with it. tongue.gif But still, why are the doctors reluctant to give N dx? The world may never know. cool.gif

#18 shallow_water

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Posted 15 March 2009 - 07:59 AM

I'm a march baby.

My mother had problems during my pregnancy - they never really knew what was wrong but she required alot of bedrest. I was sickly for a while after being born but they could never find anything wrong.

#19 dogdreams

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Posted 15 March 2009 - 10:03 AM

QUOTE (sleepless sleeper @ Mar 14 2009, 05:41 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
But still, why are the doctors reluctant to give N dx? The world may never know. cool.gif

HAHA! Yes I think I would have better luck if I went in and asked how many licks it takes to get to the center of a Tootsie Pop instead. laugh.gif

#20 eww

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Posted 15 March 2009 - 06:46 PM

To be honest I think many Drs are unfamiliar with research methods. So when they read about a study done at Stanford and they see that only patients with X,Y and Z are used, they assume that those three and only those three specific traits are necessary for a diagnosis. They don't really take into account that in Stanford's research they would try to use very concise criteria and "perfect" or "classical" cases. It makes for the clearest results. It does not mean that if you have X,Y,Z and W, or just X and Z that the diagnosis should be ruled out. In other words having "nonclassical" cataplexy or no cataplexy at all doesn't mean you don't have Narcolepsy, it just means you don't have a stereotypical case of it. Even on the Stanford website it refers to narcolepsy without cataplexy.

A lot of drs are just stuck in their ways. They've stopped treating patients and now treat conditions. dry.gif