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Usa: Medicaid?


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#1 drago

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Posted 31 January 2009 - 03:26 AM

Hi There:

I'm a recent college graduate (2008). I found out I had narcolepsy a few months after I graduated. I'm presently on my parent's insurance until my next birthday (in May). After that, though, I'm not covered.

I make $100/wk and housing (I'm an intern at a theatre company). The next step in my career will probably be roughly similar income (maybe $150/wk). I'm already sweating the bills for just the diagnosis and check ups, and that's just the copay for those visits and prescriptions! I know the number of visits will drop off, but I know I'll need to do regular visits and check-ins now.

When I'm medicated, my narcolepsy doesn't bother me (except the sleep paralysis, but even that doesn't effect my ability to work). I'm worried that if I don't have health care I won't be able to keep my perscriptions w/o doctor's visits (which I can't afford) and therefore will no longer be medicated and need to apply for disability--since I can't really do much without medication. However, I would prefer if that didn't have to happen, especially because I can't really afford private insurance anymore to cover me.

I've been looking into Medicaid and related government funds, but it requires a "disability" to be in play. Does my narcolepsy count as a disability if I haven't applied for it to be one? Like I said, when I am medicated the narcolepsy doesn't affect my work, but it definitely does when I don't have treatment. (I discovered this when they switched my medications -- like woah!)

Would they be able to provide me with medical assistance until I get a job that has health benefits (probably not for another year)? What kind of hoops are there to jump through on this?

The other problem is almost all of these agencies are state-based. I'm a permanent resident of CT right now, but I am working in Maine. I'll probably be moving to NJ or Washington, D.C. next, although who can tell these days... Anyway, would I apply for Medicaid/whatever in CT, or where I am now?

I'm 22, turning 23 soon. My parents can't really help me (and even if they could, it would be a tremendous burden). The only "asset" I have, really, is a car that I don't own that my mom is letting me use. But it's her car, I just use it in ME... I don't know if that will have any effect on all this.

...any resources on this would be super helpful.

Thanks,
drago

#2 Marcianna

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Posted 31 January 2009 - 03:45 PM

QUOTE (drago @ Jan 31 2009, 08:26 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Hi There:

I'm a recent college graduate (2008). I found out I had narcolepsy a few months after I graduated. I'm presently on my parent's insurance until my next birthday (in May). After that, though, I'm not covered.

I make $100/wk and housing (I'm an intern at a theatre company). The next step in my career will probably be roughly similar income (maybe $150/wk). I'm already sweating the bills for just the diagnosis and check ups, and that's just the copay for those visits and prescriptions! I know the number of visits will drop off, but I know I'll need to do regular visits and check-ins now.

When I'm medicated, my narcolepsy doesn't bother me (except the sleep paralysis, but even that doesn't effect my ability to work). I'm worried that if I don't have health care I won't be able to keep my perscriptions w/o doctor's visits (which I can't afford) and therefore will no longer be medicated and need to apply for disability--since I can't really do much without medication. However, I would prefer if that didn't have to happen, especially because I can't really afford private insurance anymore to cover me.

I've been looking into Medicaid and related government funds, but it requires a "disability" to be in play. Does my narcolepsy count as a disability if I haven't applied for it to be one? Like I said, when I am medicated the narcolepsy doesn't affect my work, but it definitely does when I don't have treatment. (I discovered this when they switched my medications -- like woah!)

Would they be able to provide me with medical assistance until I get a job that has health benefits (probably not for another year)? What kind of hoops are there to jump through on this?

The other problem is almost all of these agencies are state-based. I'm a permanent resident of CT right now, but I am working in Maine. I'll probably be moving to NJ or Washington, D.C. next, although who can tell these days... Anyway, would I apply for Medicaid/whatever in CT, or where I am now?

I'm 22, turning 23 soon. My parents can't really help me (and even if they could, it would be a tremendous burden). The only "asset" I have, really, is a car that I don't own that my mom is letting me use. But it's her car, I just use it in ME... I don't know if that will have any effect on all this.

...any resources on this would be super helpful.

Thanks,
drago


The answer to your question here is no. your N is not considered a disability unless you are on Social Security Disability or are in the process of trying to get it. Going that route is very ANNOYING and tricky not to mention it is extremely difficult to prove. your onna want a really good lawyer. I am not sure about your state, but I know that in Ohio, There are few other options. I wish I had better news for you. Maybe someone else has another idea? You really should go with disability as a last resort as it a very long drawn out process and if you do get it, it will change your life forever. People treat you diffrently cuz how can you possible be disabled if you have all your arms and legs right? sigh......

Good luck.

#3 loki

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Posted 01 February 2009 - 06:42 PM

It really depends on the rules of the state you live in. I would suggest you go to social services office in your state and apply for medicaid. The worst that can happen is they say no. Otherwise, your income is so low that you could probably qualify for prescription assistance programs offered by many pharmaceutical companies. Just type prescription assistance into Google to find more info on that. Also many communities have a free or sliding scale medical office where you can see a doctor to refill the prescriptions.

You could only apply in the state in which you are a legal resident. You usually cannot use your medicaid benefits outside of your state of residence either, so before you apply you'd want to be settled somewhere.