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I Hate Nicotine


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#1 Henry G

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Posted 15 August 2008 - 11:06 AM

But it works (for the short while).

I am going to pay for this badly when I try and stop.

I restarted today. I didn't know what other thing I could do.

I try to refrain as much as possible from Nicotine Chewing gums; but when I just can't take it no more: severe depression, severe weakness, life is falling apart then I retrieve this double-edge sword from my Emergency-Arsenal Cabinet.

Nicotine is truly the Devil's work. The most addictive substance known to man. Whatever temporary gain I get now - I will have to pay back 10x later.

So why take it? One may ask.

Anyone here gets into trouble with Nicotine?

#2 Lais02

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Posted 17 August 2008 - 03:17 PM

Oh no!!! I smoke... it sucks. I've been trying to quit forever lol. So currently I'm reading a book. Ok I know reading a book doesn't sound like it would help you quit smoking, but I think it will. It's called "The Easy Way to Stop Smoking" by Allen Carr. Its been out since the 80's and I admit it sat on my bookshelf for at least 3 years before I even opened it. Apparently if you finish the book you will quit. It doesn't nag you either... it's not telling you all of the things you already know, but instead the book explains why. Why we started, why we think we can't stop, and that sort of thing. I see it as the psychology behind smoking. Anyways I hope you try reading the book. I'm only about halfway through it, but I will finish this book and I will quit! smile.gif Good luck to you!

#3 Henry G

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Posted 19 August 2008 - 01:08 PM

I actually dont smoke

I am "lucky" (if that is the correct word) that I suffer from allergic asthma. My asthma is pretty much contained but if I smoke regularly it comes back pretty strong.

And quite frankly I rather have N than asthma, not being able to breathe is a truly horrible thing (not being able to remain awake is better!)

So that creates a more than strong "survival" instinct of me not rolling a ciggie.

But the problems have been Nicotine Gums

See Nicotine is really a perfect narcotic; perfectly evil that is. Even parts of your biosystem have names beginning with the prefix nicotin-
Nicotine release a lot of energy (in the beggining), it may even avert (or feels like it is averting) excessive sleepiness. I've managed to build and complete entire websites on Nicotine Gum. But the addiction after that is terrible. Absolutely terrible almost impossible to quit.

I not chewing at the moment and try to remain vigilant I don't go down that road. It may happen, because it happened so many times. But these days I reserve chewing Nicotine only for extreme case scenarios such as acute depression. Ironically Nicotine is a perfect anti-depressant (but again only to begin with!).

Some Poisons do that : they stimulate the body to go into emergency mode. Sleepiness I believe comes from the Parasympathetic Nervous System; what some Poisons do is to shut down that system and in your body goes into alert/survival mode (well at least this one does) - and then you feel tremendous alertness and energy.

The best anti-EDS drug could be something like that; not just stimulate the sympathetics but shut down the Parasympathetic. But a doctor friend of mine told me that doing that can cause complications: can't remember what they were exactly need to ask him again.

I wish I did medicine, I would have done if it hadn't been for the fact that I really hate dead bodies and the sight of Blood! smile.gif

#4 Henry G

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Posted 19 August 2008 - 01:13 PM

Here, I've found this:

http://www.painrelie...herapy_main.htm

Talks about Parasympathetic Shut down etc for a bit. But forget whatever is that they are trying to sell!

#5 DayDreaming

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Posted 27 August 2008 - 09:43 PM

this is actually really bizarre...I was just thinking about smoking and this post popped up! quick disclaimer i'm not completely ignoring all the other posts about how terrible smoking is dont get me wrong but is it the nicotine or something because i've noticed that cigs really do a great job perking me up. weirdly enough though i just saw on aol they said that it causes you to have more disturbed sleep?



#6 Henry G

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Posted 28 August 2008 - 09:03 AM

QUOTE (DayDreaming @ Aug 28 2008, 03:43 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
this is actually really bizarre...I was just thinking about smoking and this post popped up! quick disclaimer i'm not completely ignoring all the other posts about how terrible smoking is dont get me wrong but is it the nicotine or something because i've noticed that cigs really do a great job perking me up. weirdly enough though i just saw on aol they said that it causes you to have more disturbed sleep?



I have a strong suspicion my father was a Narcoleptic.
He was always sleeping or fighting off sleep. He even slept while in duty during the Second World War, he told me. He would have naps during the day but got by - by being a very heavy smoker. But then he died at the age of 75 of bad heart and lungs.

I was told by a smoker than smoking in very high amounts makes the cig a powerful stimulant. For some more powerful than Ritalin and benzindrine. But it is ultimately a deadly poison, carcinogenic and nightmareshly addictive.

I don't smoke but I am not proud in saying - I do go back to chewing Nicotine gums as a last resort. Not as a stimulant but as an anti-depressant when everything else seems to fail. Problem with that is once the depression gets (temporarily) cured, weaning away from the chewing habit becomes another Hell.

#7 Marcianna

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Posted 28 August 2008 - 01:09 PM

Has anyone besides me tried Chantix?

It actually worked very well, I had crazy nightmares and migraines and nausea all the time but in the end I quit smoking. six months.

I would have stayed "quit" too but I had a serious emotional trauma that drug me back to nicotine.

now I have to start all over again. I hated that drug, the side affect sucked horribly, but it works so I guess I will try again...eventually.

#8 greatbig47

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Posted 28 August 2008 - 01:48 PM

I fight the same battle...I'll do fine, and then too much drama enters my life, and (for some reason) my next thought is..."need....smoke...now..."

What astupid addiction....powerful, but stupid.

#9 Lais02

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Posted 28 August 2008 - 04:30 PM

QUOTE (Marcianna @ Aug 28 2008, 11:09 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Has anyone besides me tried Chantix?


Yea... I tried it this summer. It was great the first week... I could tell something was different and I really do want to quit. Then as soon as the dosage started going up, yes I really really wanted to stop. BUT I got so sick from it and I had terrible nightmares.

Oh yea this was at the same time as going off of Effexor lol. All of a sudden I was dreaming again, but they were nightmares!

I'm so mad it didn't work for me. sad.gif The nighmares weren't the only thing though. I just felt terrible on it. I tried it twice this summer... once was after the Effexor wasn't an issue anymore. Both times made me very sick.

It does work though! I have 1 friend that did it this summer, and her father did it about a year ago. I just wish it worked for me!!!

#10 Marcianna

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Posted 29 August 2008 - 03:55 PM

We need a rehab. it's so unfair that the "real" junkies can get help but we can't.

I don't see the diffrence.

#11 Kimberly

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Posted 15 October 2008 - 10:59 AM

For anyone that attended the conference, can you summarize what Dr. Lois Krahn from the Mayo Clinic presented about Nicotine and Narcolepsy?

Perhaps some of the information from that session could be helpful or interesting to those in this thread.

Thanks!

#12 Lais02

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Posted 17 October 2008 - 06:54 PM

Ok... I'll try to remember what was said, but I can't promise it's exactly correct... I was way too sleepy! smile.gif

She did a study at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN. She looked at all of the PWN and checked to see if they were ever smokers.

The sad part is that a huge percentage had at some point been smokers. I'm sorry I don't know what that percentage is right now.

Another sad part is that in the end she said nicotene seems to have some benefits to N symptoms, so us smokers are just self medicating. The bad part according to her is the smoking part, so we discussed alternative forms of nicotene.

Sorry that's all I really got. If I wake up someday and find the notes I'll try to update this.

#13 Henry G

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Posted 18 October 2008 - 06:05 PM

Nicotine can be of tremendous help at some situations.
The only trouble it is super-addictive.

Nowadays I start and stop.

With the cessations periods getting longer and longer

Nevertheless I constantly remind myself : the more I chew the most horrid the withdrawal symptom will be.
So once started I then fully concentrate on ending as fast poss.

The new small Nicorette packets (12 gums) are the best for that.
Easier to control, by the time it's gone the craving experienced is not infernal
This is where Narcolepsy then becomes of help: EDS overthrows any compulsion for me to leave the house to grab hold of some more.

#14 Kimberly

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Posted 27 October 2008 - 03:54 PM

QUOTE (Lais02 @ Oct 17 2008, 06:54 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Ok... I'll try to remember what was said, but I can't promise it's exactly correct... I was way too sleepy! smile.gif

She did a study at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN. She looked at all of the PWN and checked to see if they were ever smokers.

The sad part is that a huge percentage had at some point been smokers. I'm sorry I don't know what that percentage is right now.

Another sad part is that in the end she said nicotene seems to have some benefits to N symptoms, so us smokers are just self medicating. The bad part according to her is the smoking part, so we discussed alternative forms of nicotene.

Sorry that's all I really got. If I wake up someday and find the notes I'll try to update this.


Thanks Lais02 -- I actually found an article that provides more of an abstract of her study -- Potential Dangers Faced By Narcoleptics Who Smoke Cigarettes Considered . Text copied below:


Potential Dangers Faced By Narcoleptics Who Smoke Cigarettes Considered
ScienceDaily (June 11, 2008) — A research abstract that will be presented on June 9 at SLEEP 2008, the 22nd Annual Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies (APSS), provides the first description of nicotine use by narcolepsy patients. Because people with narcolepsy can fall asleep suddenly and without warning, even while eating, walking or driving, those who smoke nicotine in bed are at a high risk of burning either themselves or the objects around them, or starting a fire, if they fall asleep. Further, the excessive sleepiness brought on by their narcolepsy may also complicate any attempt by them to quit the habit of nicotine use.

The study, authored by Lois Krahn, MD, of the Mayo Clinic in Scottsdale, Ariz., focused on unpublished data from a community-based study of narcolepsy, followed by a questionnaire distributed at last year's Narcolepsy Network national meeting to obtain more information.

According to the results, in the community-based study, 62.5 percent of narcolepsy patients were past or present smokers. Seventeen questionnaires were completed, in which 47 percent of respondents were past or present nicotine users. All respondents identified nicotine as an effective in decreasing sleepiness. Thirty-seven percent fell asleep while smoking. Twenty-five percent smoked in bed. Burns were reported by 75 percent involving clothing, furniture or carpet. One respondent started a fire. One substituted nicotine patches for cigarettes years ago to continue a "powerful" means to decrease cataplexy. All tried to quit smoking, but described having difficulty because sleepiness worsened without nicotine.

"Burns are a potentially serious complication for patients smoking nicotine. Although burns appear to be common in our preliminary survey, the lack of a denominator precludes conclusions about their frequency. Narcolepsy patients who smoke may have more trouble quitting because of increased sleepiness. The role of nicotine to self-medicate sleepiness and cataplexy merits more study," said Dr. Krahn.

Narcolepsy is a sleep disorder that causes people to fall asleep uncontrollably during the day. It also includes features of dreaming that occur while awake. Other common symptoms include sleep paralysis, hallucinations and cataplexy. About one out of every 2,000 people is known to have narcolepsy. The chance that you have narcolepsy is higher when a relative also has it. Narcolepsy affects the same number of men and women.

- American Academy of Sleep Medicine (2008, June 11). Potential Dangers Faced By Narcoleptics Who Smoke Cigarettes Considered. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 27, 2008, from http://www.sciencedaily.com­ /releases/2008/06/080609071317.htm