supercat

What do you do for a living?

158 posts in this topic

I'm a genetic counselor for a high risk perinatal center. I was diagnosed with idiopathic hypersomnia in February of 2011 but they couldn't rule out N. Last Friday I was officially put into the N category by my new doc here in Florida. We are pretty sure I have had the condition since a small child since I have always had EDS, sleep walking and hypnagogic hallucinations. I never really paid attention to how abnormal it was until I was in grad school, mostly due to how many hypnagogic hallucinations I was having.

Like someone else said though - I'm not going to let N stop me from what I love to do! I love genetics, I love my job, I love to craft, I am going to start up taekwondo and kick-boxing again... And again, like someone else said, I'm so glad to have found a place that is full of people who know exactly what this is like.

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I am an RN in an Adult ICU, day shift, full-time. Sometimes it's a struggle to concentrate when it's busy.

What type of work do you do?

I have a high achieving daughter (in her late 20's) who was diagnosed with Narc in her last year of university.She is now pursuing a stressful career as an attorney.With the assistance of meds she strives to maintain a normal professional career and social life for a bright & outgoing young person.She is single & has not advised anyone at work of her Narc.My impression is she works harder & longer to compensate.I would like her to lead a less pressured lifestyle and ,to the extent feasible,reduce her reliance on meds.What advice can others provide on how I can encourage this outcome? - or even if I should do so ?

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I am a sonographer/ultrasound tech. I have degrees in both x-ray and ultrasound. Working in radiology can be challenging because it requires me to work in a dark or dim room. I do the ultrasound in the dark and my desk is in the ultrasound work room where the images are interpreted. That room requires dim lighting as well. I work the typical 9-5, 40 hour week job. I was diagnosis with narcolepsy 4 months ago. Working is about all I can do. I have a 45 minute one way commute to work. I get up at 5am and get home at 6pm. Working a 9 hr day and driving nearly 2 hours takes all of my energy. My employer did not agree to accommodate the 1 reasonable request I submitted. I dont get any 15 minute naping breaks. I work for one of the biggest and best university/medical centers in the nation yet they still do not understand what narcolepsy really is...even after I educated them on the condition. I've been feeling really down and depressed about my situation lately.

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I'm finishing up graduate school right now. My masters is in library and information science with a focus on youth services and I'm k-12 certified in that area with half a dozen endorsements. But there are no jobs in that field where I live. Too many librarians and teachers. So I am finishing up my CAS in that area and getting a graduate certificate in applied behavior analysis. I work with children and adults with special needs, mostly autism. I'm just starting my own business doing this. I am not willing or able to handle a commute of more than 30 minutes, 40 minutes max. I wanted part time since I have a baby and other disabilties. It is really tough. We will see how it goes. I could probably be a stay at home mom, but I tried that and would rather work at least some. We are place bound for my husband's job, so I can't relocate for the job I want either. And if I want to have another kid, that is another issue as pregnancy was very difficult even on xyrem.

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I'm an operations systems analyst. Basically, I sit and stare at a computer screen all night, waiting for something to break, and then I fix it--or call someone who can, if I can't. Didn't used to be so bad, because I was able to distract myself in the slow times, sometimes by crocheting, sometimes by reading, sometimes playing a game on my phone ... But, Management has decided we can't do any of that anymore, which means about the only thing I can do is surf the 'net, which is really rather boring--and one of the shift supervisors is even trying to crack down on that, which would leave me with absolutely nothing to do but twiddle my thumbs and stare at a screen. Not an ideal situation.

However, I'm back in school, working on my BS in Computer Science, specializing in programming. I've been coding for fun since I was a kid, but not in any language that's actually useful in the business world, so I need to learn new languages (yay!) and get the paper that says I know them. Then, hopefully, I can find a job as a programmer--either with my current company or elsewhere. Then I'll have a job where I actually have things to work on! Programming can be stressful, yes, but nothing beats the feeling you get when you finally work out a problem that's been driving you up a wall. Love, love, love that feeling! Plus, a lot of the programmers for the company I currently work for get to work from home. I'm all for that.

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This thread gives me hope that maybe I can work in a demanding job. I'm a pharmacy technician and a student right now. I know I need to work in a profession where it is challenging and to be on my feet. I can't sit still. One reason is falling asleep risk, the other reason is because of ADHD. :)

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I work in volunteer administration for a non-profit building wheelchair ramps for low-income seniors and families. It's been difficult because all of our teams are scheduled in the morning, and I can't always guarantee that I will wake up soon enough to get everything ready and make it to the site on-time. My boss has been thinking about firing me for a long time now because of this, despite the enormous expansion and funding I've brought into the program. I was diagnosed after I was hired, and it's proving to be real obstacle to any sort of professional development because of the strain it puts on my employee and my supervisor. I love this job, I love the work that I do every day, and I wish N didn't stand in the way so much, I just don't want to admit defeat, has anyone figured out how to make stringent morning schedules work? With my medication I don't have terrible sleep attacks anymore, but the c is getting worse. Anyone have any advice on controlling the c? 

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