microrespite2day

doinmdarndest here.

5 posts in this topic

Amphetamines were well tolerated in me at some very high doses.  Those who have been here awhile remember me.

Got my Rx stopped.  Went to street meth and moderators banned me for discussing it.

Now I got in trouble with the law, they have me on drug tested probation for 3 years so I gotta endure my symptoms unmedicated. 

My boss is also my friend he's cutting me a lot of slack.  Otherwise I'd be homeless. 

Lost my relationship with Susan,  the beautiful woman in the Santa suit in my profile pic as doinmdirndest. 

 

Life is a bit tough.

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:( Sounds like it, man. Just now saw this thread. Have you tried strattera before? It's unscheduled, so the cops should be ok with you taking it, I would think. I'd also understand if you're kinda wary of all Rx meds now, but the addiction profile for it is quite good, that is to say, it's not very likely to be habit forming.

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Good advice, I'll look into it with my new md. Heartbreak has led me into the most severe hard drinking imaginable. Beginning when I wake up, all day, too. Began months ago. Cancelled eating entirely, calories from beer only to feed me. Smoking, too, to while away the lonely void.

 

The consequences came in 5 weeks ago.

Vomiting quite often, next vomiting blood.  Went to the local ER 5 days ago, when at first a doctor was told my situation he told me drinking was the problem. It was the beginning of an all day process, as i rested in a gown which was best as I was quite sickly. The whole gamut of blood draws and tests chest x ray were conducted, day concluded with the information better than I expected. All tests normal.

It was reiterated that I must not drink. Managed to comply. Cold turkey with pack a day Marlboros too. I find I wanna live.

Done some damage to myself. Digestive function ruined. Can only eat.Couple bites at a time.  Dry spot in the middle of my chest sides stick together when I lay down to sleep, brings on hacking.  I'm healing, and it's gonna take time. Must keep those bad habits out of life.

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I'm very sorry to hear that, it's always difficult when something else confounds the N, which is hard enough on it's own. If I can recommend anything, St. John's Wort (standardized for hyperforin, not hypericin) and Kudzu Root have solid evidence for their roles in alcohol use disorder. I'll quote from the review "Natural medicines for alcoholism treatment":

Quote

 

Hypericum perforatum Several pre-clinical studies showed that extracts of H. perforatum (St John’s wort) might reduce voluntary intake of alcohol significantly in several strains of alcohol-preferring rats: the fawn-hooded (FH) rats, the high-alcohol-drinking (HAD) rats, the Marchigian Sardinian (msP) rats and the cAA rats [28 – 34]. Hyperforin has been suggested to be an active compound, which reduces alcohol intake [31]. Although the mechanism of action of the extracts of H. perforatum on alcohol intake was not understood fully, the ability of the H. perforatum to affect serotonergic, dopaminergic and opioidergic systems in mesolinbic regions in the central nervous system (CNS), directly or indirectly, might help to explain its efficacy in the treatment of mild to moderate depression and alcoholism.

Pueraria lobata P. lobata, also known as kudzu, has been used as a medicine in China since 200 BC (Shen Nong Ben Cao Jing, Anonymous, about 200 BC). It has a special reputation as an anti-intoxication agent noted in the Chinese Pharmacopeia of AD 600 (Thousand Golden Prescriptions, Sun Simiao, about AD 600) and later as an anti-dipsotropic agent (Li Dongyuan, about AD 1200). Flos Puerariae and Radix Puerariae were typical hangover remedies in the traditional Chinese medicine. The scientists also noted that kudzu suppressed alcohol’s intoxicating effects after it entered the bloodstream, tending to confirm the ancient claim that taking kudzu before drinking alcohol helped to stave off intoxication and hangovers. Research with laboratory animals revealed that a drug extracted from kudzu root might help the treatment of alcoholism [35 – 37]. Keung and coworkers reported that in Syrian golden hamsters, daidzin and daidzein were active isoflavonoids isolated from the kudzu that suppressed alcohol preference [38 – 40]. Later, the anti-dipsotropic activity of daidzin was confirmed in all alcohol-drinking animal tests [41 – 44]. Results of studies indicated that daidzin was effective in suppressing the craving for alcohol [35,36,38,39,45,46]. In addition, NPI-028 (kudzu) and one of its pure components, puerarin (NPI-031G), were found to selectively reduce alcohol intake in alcohol-preferring rats [43]. Puerarin is the most concentrated isoflavonoid in kudzu. Although it is not as potent as daidzin [47], the sugar moiety is attached to the carbon molecule instead of the oxygen, leading to a more stable compound than daidzin. After acute intraperitoneal administration, puerarin reduced alcohol intake selectively [43,47,48]. Interestingly, reduction of alcohol intake was observed in all the three strains tested: FH [47,49], HAD [49] and P rats [50]. Further studies found that puerarin could counteract the reduced social interaction exhibited by alcohol withdrawn rats by blocking either benzodiazepine or 5-HT2C receptors or both [51]. This finding indicated that NPI-031G had anxiolytic effects in alcohol withdrawn rats. However, two recent investigations on the effects of Radix Puerariae [52] and its major isoflavone puerarin [53] on voluntary alcohol intake and alcohol withdrawal symptoms in P rats indicated that they suppressed alcohol drinking and withdrawal symptoms without entering the brain. The absence of puerarin in plasma and the brain indicated the possibility that some non-specific mechanism might be involved in the anti-alcoholism effects of Radix Puerariae in P rats.

 

For liver damage, Milk Thistle is exceptionally powerful even compared to pharmaceuticals:

Quote

Drugs. 2001;61(14):2035-63.
The use of silymarin in the treatment of liver diseases.


The high prevalence of liver diseases such as chronic hepatitis and cirrhosis underscores the need for efficient and cost-effective treatments. The potential benefit of silymarin (extracted from the seeds of Silybum marianum or milk thistle) in the treatment of liver diseases remains a controversial issue. Therefore, the objective of this review is to assess the clinical efficacy and safety of silymarin by application of systematic approach. 525 references were found in the databases, of which 84 papers were retained for closer examination and 36 were deemed suitable for detailed analysis. Silymarin has metabolic and cell-regulating effects at concentrations found in clinical conditions, namely carrier-mediated regulation of cell membrane permeability, inhibition of the 5-lipoxygenase pathway, scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS) of the R-OH type and action on DNA-expression, for example, via suppression of nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB. Pooled data from case record studies involving 452 patients with Amanita phalloides poisoning show a highly significant difference in mortality in favour of silibinin [the main isomer contained in silymarin] (mortality 9.8% vs 18.3% with standard treatment; p < 0.01). The available trials in patients with toxic (e.g. solvents) or iatrogenic (e.g. antispychotic or tacrine) liver diseases, which are mostly outdated and underpowered, do not enable any valid conclusions to be drawn on the value of silymarin. The exception is an improved clinical tolerance of tacrine. In spite of some positive results in patients with acute viral hepatitis, no formally valid conclusion can be drawn regarding the value of silymarin in the treatment of these infections. Although there were no clinical end-points in the four trials considered in patients with alcoholic liver disease, histological findings were reported as improved in two out of two trials, improvement of prothrombin time was significant (two trials pooled) and liver transaminase levels were consistently lower in the silymarin-treated groups. Therefore, silymarin may be of use as an adjuvant in the therapy of alcoholic liver disease. Analysis was performed on five trials with a total of 602 patients with liver cirrhosis. The evidence shows that, compared with placebo, silymarin produces a nonsignificant reduction of total mortality by -4.2% [odds ratio (OR) 0.75 (0.5 - 1.1)]; but that, on the other hand, the use of silymarin leads to a significant reduction in liver-related mortality of-7% [OR: 0.54 (0.3 - 0.9); p < 0.01]. An individual trial reported a reduction in the number of patients with encephalopathy of -8.7% (p = 0.06). In one study of patients with cirrhosis-related diabetes mellitus, the insulin requirement was reduced by -25% (p < 0.01). We conclude that available evidence suggests that silymarin may play a role in the therapy of (alcoholic) liver cirrhosis. Silymarin is has a good safety record and only rare case reports of gastrointestinal disturbances and allergic skin rashes have been published. This review does not aim to replace future prospective trials aiming to provide the 'final' evidence of the efficacy of silymarin.


For mental health, I've read a lot of anecdotal reports online of Tianeptine both lowering the desire for alcohol and improving mental health. It strongly raises BDNF and is a very effective antidepressant that can be used as an adjunct therapy. 

Piracetam also has a good neuroprotective effect on alcohol consumption (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/4062922), would help with cognitive dysfunction from all the emotionally taxing things you've gone through, and has a lightly stimulating effect for most people. Of course, I would check for interactions between the aforementioned supplements and whatever they have you taking right now. I tend to use Nootropicsdepot for many of my herbal extracts and for Tianeptine/Piracetam. Iherb and Vitacost are also pretty economic and as we both live in California, I find they usually have it at my front door only 1-2 days after ordering. Hope I could help in some way, I have a large family history of alcoholism and I've seen the damage that poorly understood genetic problems can wreck on the lives of sincere people. We're all here if you need us!

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Hey guy, I've followed your story right from the beginning and my heart goes out to you! I have also gone down many wrong roads in life myself and have had to pay a high price for my poor choices, but like you, I'm still around to fight another day. :)

You're starting down the right road now, and I know you're just ornery enough to make it work! It's gonna be a fight for your life, but despite any short-term setbacks you may see, I'm living proof that both your issues can be overcome for good. Never give up! Good healthy food, and as much outdoor physical exercise as you can muster on a daily basis, will help speed your recovery.

You will have me rooting for you, and well,  why not let's enlist the powers of the cosmos as well. :)

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